Articles about "journalism"


22 journalism contests for awards season

Journalists who aren’t forced to work on Christmas and Thanksgiving are doubly blessed. In addition to a rare day off and a meal that’s not eaten in front of a keyboard, they have journalism awards season to look forward to.

From now until April, applications for some of America’s most prestigious journalism contests will remain open. So if have some time off and a fantastic story in your portfolio, you might consider putting your name forward for one of the following awards:

Berger Award
Deadline: March 9
Prize: $1,500
Description: “The prize, named after the late New York Times reporter Meyer “Mike” Berger, is awarded to a reporter for outstanding human-interest reporting.”

Cabot Prizes
Deadline: March 16
Prize: $5,000
Description: “The prizes recognize a distinguished body of work that has contributed to Inter-American understanding.”

The Dart Awards for Excellence in Coverage of Trauma
Deadline: Jan. Read more

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‘You learn it by doing it’: Readers weigh in on Berkeley’s proposed 10k fee

On Monday, I wrote about a proposed $10,250 supplemental fee at the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism. While I was compiling the (mostly unfavorable) responses, I asked Poynter’s readers whether they thought pricey graduate degrees were worthwhile. Here’s what they had to say:

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50ShadesofGreyCover-cropped

What writers can un-learn from ‘Fifty Shades of Grey’

The release of a hot trailer for the movie version of Fifty Shades of Grey has stirred up renewed attention to the book trilogy that spawned it, the work of a very lucky British woman named E.L. James.  I very much like the arc of her personal story: from self-publishing the first book to sales of more than 90 million copies worldwide, with translations into more than 50 languages.  So perhaps I should make this a very short essay with this advice to writers everywhere: Sex sells.

But just as there is good food writing and bad food writing; good sports writing and bad sports writing; there is also good sex writing and bad sex writing. To illustrate this, I have chosen a scene – almost at random – from one of James’s book to analyze.  As you will see, it turns out to be much less graphic than the bondage scenes for which the work has become famous and notorious, but the style of writing remains consistent:

Christian nods as he turns and leads me through the double doors into the grandiose foyer.

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Employment down, anchor salaries stagnant in local TV newsrooms

Pew Research Center

Despite increased budgets and an optimistic advertising market, anchor salaries and employment were down throughout local television newsrooms in 2013, Katerina Matsa reported for Pew Research Center Wednesday.

The Pew report was based on a survey of 1,300 local news directors published by RTDNA and Hofstra University.

A little more than half of local TV news directors nationwide reported that their budgets increased in 2013, but the number of full-time jobs fell to about 27,300, down 400 from 2012, according to the report. When news directors added new employees to the staff, they were most likely to hire producers and reporters, according to the study.

These budget increases weren’t reflected in anchor salaries, however. Median anchor salaries fell by $1,500 in 2013, going from $64,000 to $62,500. But reporters saw a slight pay increase, from 30,000 in 2012 to 31,000 in 2013. And employees in charge of producing graphics saw their pay increase during 2013. Read more

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stethoscope in doctors office showing medical health concept

After journalism’s disruption, a reporter chooses medicine as a career

I was sitting in the lecture hall of my medical school as a first-year student when the attending physician, a gray-haired internal medicine doctor, asked a question which set off, for me, a maelstrom of emotions. He had just referenced a story in that day’s Chicago Tribune which was relevant to his lecture on physiology.

“Just curious,” he said. “How many of you even get the newspaper delivered?” Out of dozens of University of Illinois College of Medicine students in class that day — bright, eager, well-educated young people — my hand was the only one that went up.

I doubt anyone else gave it a second thought. It was a passing inquiry meant merely to highlight the changing times: pretty much every young person gets their news online these days, if they get the news at all.

But for me — a former reporter for the Tribune and The Associated Press – the moment encapsulated one of the big reasons I was even sitting there. Read more

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The 5 goals of teaching journalism tools (outside the classroom)

The future of journalism education has stirred some additional and passionate stories this week. Jeff Jarvis, paying honor to Eric Newton’s speech about journalism education’s “symphony of slowness” and my own article on Poynter Online which opined that “journalism education can’t teach its way to the future,” has weighed in on BuzzMachine.

Jarvis puts curriculum into three boxes: study, practice and tools. He argues that schools should change how they teach and what they teach.

Jarvis argues that classroom time is not the best time to teach tools. Those who do teach tools — outside the classroom — should have a more practical focus:

“Schools try to express their goals in terms of outcomes for students. I chart tools against a set of outcomes rising from:
* Familiarity — Knowing what a tool can do so you can be inspired to use it when appropriate to meet a journalistic or community goal.

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greatbosses

To build the team, build the trust, with these 8 tips

Take a look at a photo I really admire. It’s a little soft-focus and the framing is a bit off. That’s what makes it perfect. After all, the photographer had only seconds to shoot and only one free camera hand. His other was in that stack.

It was a surprise moment at the end of recent seminar for new managers, one that meant a lot to them. For me, the image is a vivid reminder of how trust and teams grow — under the right conditions. I’ll share the photo’s back story, but first let’s focus on trust.

Great bosses know it’s important to build trust in organizations. But managers can’t simply mandate it, any more than Poynter faculty can command people in our programs to reach out to each other. It must be their own choice.

But leaders can create an atmosphere where the choosing comes easily.

That’s important work with a great payoff. Read more

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10 tips for preventing staff burnout in spite of more work, fewer resources

Motivation. It’s a popular topic in leadership teaching. Keeping staff members engaged, positive and productive has always been a management responsibility.

But today, the questions about motivation are often more blunt, even raw. How do we handle the human impact of an shrinking workforce tasked with increasing workload? How much is too much to ask of people before they break faith with management, or just plain break down?

Look at the word cloud of Digital First editors’ recent responses to the question “What obstacles do you face in getting things done?”

Nearly half of the people who responded to our Twitter poll said “staff” is the biggest obstacle to getting things done.

The big fat images are a shout out for support: staff, equipment, time — positioned near that most telling word, “lack.” It’s a billboard display of what most newsroom managers think, talk about, and struggle with today.

Look at the headline for a recent Poynter.org chat: “How to Tell When It’s Time to Get Out of Journalism.” In the conversation, chat host Joe Grimm, who’s coached countless careers, brought up the B-word:

The out-and-out “let’s get out” decision often follows a series of disappointments or a period of burnout.

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greatbosses

What Great Bosses Know about 7 coaching questions and answers

Most managers I know share similar goals. They want to:

  • Grow and maintain quality staff and products
  • Do less “fixing” of unsatisfactory work
  • Delegate decision-making to others, with confidence
  • Be attentive, accessible and involved, without micromanaging

You’ll improve your chances of reaching these goals by building a key skill: Coaching.

It’s such an important skill that I regularly include it in my leadership teaching — and it’s often among the most highly rated topics in our seminar evaluations.

Here are 7 questions and answers about coaching.

1. What exactly is coaching?

I think of coaching as guided discovery.

2. How does it work?

Acting in partnership, a coach helps an individual make a decision, solve a problem, or improve a skill.

3. Why is coaching effective?

Coaches don’t simply tell people what to do – or do it for them. They help them realize how to bridge the gap between where they are and where they want — or need — to be. Read more

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