Articles about "Katharine Weymouth"


Timeline of Katharine Weymouth and The Washington Post

The Graham family connection to The Washington Post began on June 1, 1933 when Eugene Meyer, the great-grandfather of Katharine Weymouth, bought the paper at a bankruptcy sale for $825,000.

We have compiled this short timeline about Weymouth and The Post as a reminder of the most interesting chapters in the history of the Graham dynasty’s relationship with its former paper.

May 1966
Katharine Weymouth is born to Lally and Yann Weymouth. She grows up in New York City. Her mother is the eldest of four children of Katharine and Philip Graham.

1968
Benjamin Bradlee is named executive editor of The Post.

June 15, 1971
The Washington Post Company goes public with the sale of common stock.

June 18, 1971
The newspaper starts publishing the Pentagon Papers.… Read more

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Katharine Weymouth

Katharine Weymouth’s resignation completes the close of the Graham era at the Washington Post

Katharine Weymouth (Photo by Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post)

In a word, unsurprising. Katharine Weymouth’s announced resignation today as Washington Post publisher simply completes the ownership change initiated a year and a month ago when Amazon’s Jeff Bezos bought the paper.

Neither Bezos nor Weymouth were commenting (even to the Post) about the circumstances and timing of the change, though the New York Times reported it was initiated by Bezos. My guess would have been that she had agreed to stay on for a transitional year as part of the sale, but perhaps she was trying out for a longer tenure with the new owner.

It is hard to call Weymouth’s six-plus years as publisher a success, but I wouldn’t say she failed in the job either. … Read more

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Katharine Weymouth at Poynter in 2010: ‘You just keep plugging away’

In 2010, Washington Post Publisher Katharine Weymouth (who announced Tuesday that she’s leaving the paper) appeared at the Poynter Institute for a discussion about the book “The Edge of Change: Women in the 21st Century Press.” Weymouth spoke with audience members and Karen Dunlap, then Poynter’s president, about her role and digital changes at the Post.

Here’s a link to C-Span’s coverage of the talk.

And here are five things Weymouth said during her visit to Poynter.

1. There’s no magic bullet for the news industry:

“It’s scary from the business perspective, how do you sustain quality journalism? But the demand for news and the ability to get news is greater than ever… People write about and talk a lot about the decline of circulation of newspapers and oh my God, what’s happening?… Read more

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Sheryl Gay Stolberg profiles Washington Post publisher Katharine Weymouth:

In the meantime, things have been looking up. In January, Ms. Weymouth replaced Mr. Brauchli with Martin Baron, a no-nonsense newsman from The Boston Globe (and, previously, The New York Times), who has won praise for sharpening coverage and boosting morale. Reporters at The Post who routinely question whether their publisher “gets what we do,” now wonder if maybe, just maybe, she has found her Ben Bradlee after all.

“She made a brilliant choice,” [Post columnist Sally] Quinn said, “and it’s working.”

Not everyone is so effusive. The Post recently began charging for online access, but the climate for newspapers in general, and The Post in particular, remains tough. Mr. Baron called Ms. Weymouth “a realist,” who “still wants us to do really great journalism,” albeit “within the reality of our economic circumstances.” But he could not rule out further cuts.

Sheryl Gay Stolberg, The New York Times

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Carr: Weymouth is the problem at Washington Post

The New York Times | The Washington Post | Nieman | New York | Adweek
Last week’s change in editorial leadership at The Washington Post was “mishandled from the start,” David Carr writes. Publisher Katharine Weymouth, who engineered the change, “still seems to be struggling to get a grasp on a huge job at a company whose journalism has at times altered the course of a nation,” Carr says.… Read more

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Washington Post creates Chief Experience Officer position

Romenesko+ memo
Post publisher Katharine Weymouth says the paper is creating this CXO post, as it’s called, “to strengthen the voice of the consumer in our product development and execution.” Laura Evans, who has spent most of her nine years at the Post as chief researcher, has been named to the position. Weymouth writes in a memo announcing the appointment:

One of the three foundational elements of our strategy is a relentless focus on the customer. While we all care about the customer and try to advocate for the customer, we do not currently have an executive owner of the customer experience. That was acceptable when we published one newspaper a day—when we had a well-honed product with over a century of research behind it. In a day when we have evolved to a 24/7 news operation
publishing on multiple platforms, and when we operate in a hyper-competitive market, the customer must be the primary driver of our product-related decisions and changes.

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