Articles about "Layoffs/buyouts/staff cuts"


Nelson Mandela

The New Yorker still fact-checks more than you do

Good morning. Here are 10 (or so) media stories.

  1. What happened between NBC News and Ayman Mohyeldin? NBC News said Friday it would return the reporter to Gaza. (HuffPost) | The clumsy move was less a conspiracy than a “news division making mistakes through ratings nervousness.” (CNN) | Here’s a Mohyeldin report from this morning. (NBC News)
  2. The new NewYorker.com launches: “The Web site already publishes fifteen original stories a day. We are promising more, as well as an even greater responsiveness to what is going on in the world.” (The New Yorker) | The publication assigns one fact-checker to its website: “And not to be defensive, but that’s one more fact-checker than probably anyone else has,” Editor David Remnick says. (Capital) | OH NO, A LISTICLE: The New Yorker tweets “eight things we think you’ll love” about the new site. (@NewYorker)
  3. Russian media broadcasts conspiracy theories about downed plane: “The Russian media space has become so uniform and independent voices so cowed and marginalized that there is no counterweight.” (The New Republic) | Russian-government funded English-language network RT reacts to reporter Sara Firth‘s resignation: “apparently we have different definitions of truth” (The Washington Post) | Firth: “I don’t think there are different definitions and versions of the truth.” (CNN) | Propaganda broadcasts in Russia “has become a problem for Putin, because this system cannot be wholly managed.” (The New Yorker)
  4. The New York Daily News is an “insane asylum”: That’s according to photographer David Handschuh, one of the 17 newsroom employees laid off Friday.
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Editor fired for Reddit shenanigans, BuzzFeed editors don’t shout

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories for the day before your long weekend. And from Sam Kirkland, your daily digital stories.

  1. Editor fired for gaming Reddit: Rod “Slasher” Breslau was fired from CBS Interactive’s esports site OnGamers after he was “caught asking other users to post his stories to Reddit with specific headlines,” Patrick Howell O’Neill reports. Reddit has banned OnGamers as a result, resulting in a loss of half its traffic. (The Daily Dot) || Related: How to get your news site banned from Reddit (Poynter)
  2. These media companies drug-test their employees: The Washington Post, The New York Times and McClatchy all want you to fill a cup. (Gawker)
  3. Voice of America journalists don’t want to be mouthpieces: Their union endorsed a change to the organization’s charter that would require VOA to “actively support American policy,” Ron Nixon reports. (NYT)
  4. NYPD’s public records policy gets law wrong: It says it has 10 days to reply. The law says 5. (Capital) || FREEKY FLASHBAKK: NYPD stops giving journalists crime reports at precincts (Poynter)
  5. USPS cuts could affect weekly newspapers: National Newspaper Association President Robert M.
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Chat

Live Chat replay: Journalist Rodney Curtis tells how he got laid (off), lived to laugh about it

Rodney Curtis is not right. Like thousands of other journalists, he got laid off. Unlike all the others, though, he decided this would make a funny book, “Getting Laid (Off).” Who does that? Seriously, folks, American Society of News Editors surveys show that newsroom employment is down from a peak of 56,900 in 1989 to 38,000 in 2012. The 2013 number is expected to be smaller.

Poynter career chats feature job opportunities and strategies for journalists, but the new journalism jobs have not filled that gap and many have had to leave the industry. Curtis’ approach seems to be that if you can’t beat ‘em, tickle ‘em. Has it worked for Curtis? Can it work for anyone else?

See below a replay of our Wednesday, April 23, talk with Curtis.

Visit www.poynter.org/chats to find an archive of all past chats.

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A reserved sign and flowers are seen on a table at Holsten's ice cream parlor Thursday, June 20, 2013, in Bloomfield, N.J., with a newspaper announcing the death of actor James Gandolfini. Gandolfini was mourned in the northern New Jersey towns where his TV character Tony Soprano lived, loved and whacked people. The star died Wednesday night in Italy of an apparent heart attack. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)

Advance laid off more than 300 people in N.J.

The Star-Ledger | The New York Times | The Daily Beast | Philly.com

Some 306 people lost jobs at Advance’s New Jersey properties Thursday, Mark Mueller and Ted Sherman report in The (Newark, N.J.) Star-Ledger. At the Star-Ledger, 167 staffers, 40 of them from the newsroom, were laid off as Advance tries to reposition its newsgathering operations for digital readership.

“Another 124 full- and part-time jobs were eliminated at the company’s weekly newspapers and at the dailies in Trenton, Easton, and South Jersey,” Mueller and Sherman write. “At NJ.com, 15 of 77 employees were let go.”

Matt Kraner, the president of NJ Advance Media, the new company that will provide content and other services to the papers, told The New York Times the group “will be adding 27 editorial positions to increase the numbers of reporters and photographers on the street.” The cuts will nevertheless present “a net reduction in editorial staff,” Ravi Somaiya reports.

When asked whether the moves diminished The Star-Ledger, its publisher, Richard Vezza, said in a phone interview: “I don’t look at it that way. I look at it as a transition to an organization for the future.”

NJ Advance Media will be based in Woodbridge, N.J., Mueller and Sherman report.… Read more

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Technology background, News text in perspective

What went wrong at Digital First Media — and what’s next?

The announced shutdown of Digital First Media’s national newsroom Wednesday and the probable sale of its 75 daily newspapers later this year is a significant jolt to those who believe a viable business model for rapid transformation of legacy operations is close at hand.

CEO John Paton’s explanation in his blog that the company has decided to dismantle Project Thunderdome “to go in a new direction” barely hints at the converging economic troubles.

Most basically, the very able editor Jim Brady (a Poynter National Advisory Board member) and his lieutenants were like a crack auto racing team trying to succeed in a highly competitive field driving Chevy Cobalts.

The two companies that were merged into Digital First, Journal Register and MediaNews, have both been through bankruptcies, Journal Register twice. Both had been under-invested for years in content management systems and other essential technology.

Steve Buttry, who was just months into “Project Unbolt” to hasten the break from print habits to digital, told me the four pilot papers for that project all had different CMSes, none of them especially good.

It is myth, embraced by digital future-of-news enthusiasts, that Web publishing is close to free. Paton seemed of that view early in his tenure when he asked newsrooms to use mainly free tools to put out their reports for a week.Read more

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CNN Atlanta lays off 16 from image, sound unit

TV Newser | The Wrap

Sixteen CNN employees based in Atlanta have been laid off, a CNN source confirmed to Poynter Thursday by email.

TV Newser reported those released include photojournalists and video editors from the company’s image and sound unit:… Read more

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PoynterVision: Transitioning from newspapers to corporate communications

After working for 27 years in newspapers, Butch Ward, senior faculty and former managing director at Poynter, left his final newspaper post at The Philadelphia Inquirer in 2001. Eight months later, Ward joined the Independence Blue Cross in Philadelphia as the vice president for corporate and public affairs, putting him “on the other side of the wall” with journalists. Watch the video to hear how Ward navigated the transition.


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How laid-off journalists can stay afloat while the industry moves ‘to new moorings’

When Patch laid me off along with many other editors last May, I remember thinking I should have left sooner.

I received a severance but then faced tough competition from dozens of downsized journalists, all chasing after what seemed at the time like precious few journalism jobs.

Economic conditions have improved since last year. I see more listings on Poynter, JournalismJobs, Mediabistro, Gorkana and other job boards. Still, the number of opportunities won’t match the hundreds of Patch and Time Inc. workers laid off lately.

Journalists who have not sought employment recently may be shocked at how drastically the jobs landscape has changed. The market they are walking into won’t be the one that greeted them when they first got their J-school degrees.

Digital skills these long-timers told themselves they’d get around to learning are often what employers are seeking today. Beyond writing for the Web, video editing, and social media knowledge, employers want those with high level technical skills like programming, data visualization, mapping and other abilities that require concentrated study to acquire.

Patch employees accustomed to the daily demands of multimedia reporting might have an advantage in today’s job market. But I suspect they, too, may want to pick up skills that are more in demand now than even three short years ago.… Read more

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Live chat replay: What happens when a journalism career breaks?

Thousands of journalists have had to pick up the pieces and start over because of layoffs, firings and downsizing.

Warren Watson, executive director of the Society of American Business Editors and Writers, has interviewed several of them and is working on a project about broken journalism careers.

He has had some career interruptions himself. We talked about how journalists restart their career, what they have experienced, how you can be prepared and what kinds of entirely different careers former journalists enter.

Replay the live chat for an honest conversation about strategies for dealing with career interruptions. Watson even shared some very unique career transitions such as a photojournalist who started a gourmet pizza business and another former journalist who is now a dog and horse trainer.

We also offered advice about how to avoid the downward spiral that may come with switching careers or losing a job and the importance of rekindling your self-confidence.

You can revisit this page at any time to replay the chat after it has ended. Visit www.poynter.org/chats to find an archive of all past chats.

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Joe Ripp (Time Inc. photo)

Time Inc. CEO: Layoffs, big organizational changes coming today

New York Post

Time Inc. will begin layoffs today — about 500, Keith Kelly reports. In a memo to staffers, Time Inc. CEO Joe Ripp says the company’s plans require “substantive and sometimes painful changes to the way we operate and approach our business.”

All Time Inc.’s U.S. brands “will be consolidated into a single portfolio under two executives, Evelyn Webster and Todd Larsen,” Ripp writes. Executive Vice President David Geithner will leave, as will American Express Publishing CEO Ed Kelly. Mark Ford will become executive VP of advertising sales, Ripp says.

Kelly reports that AmEx Publishing’s Executive Travel magazine will be shut down.

As Time Inc. approaches its planned IPO, Ripp writes, “Wall Street’s focus will be on the performance of Time Inc. and on our ability to grow beyond print, embracing new technologies, new products, new markets, and new customers. Every employee in the organization needs to be fully invested in the performance of the company.”

Ripp’s full memo:

To: Time Inc. Colleagues

From: Joe Ripp

Re: Moving Forward

Since I returned to Time Inc. in September, we have made a lot of progress. We have built a seasoned executive team that has been working with many of you on ways we can stabilize revenues and redirect our spending for the future.

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