Articles about "Layoffs/buyouts/staff cuts"


It matters how Rolling Stone reported its UVA rape story

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Rolling Stone story causes the wrong kind of unease

    Sabrina Rubin Erdely's story finally got UVA's administration to deal with campus sexual assault. But if it "turns out to be a hoax, it is going to turn the clock back on their thinking 30 years,” Caitlin Flanagan tells Allison Benedikt and Hanna Rosin. They found Jackie, the main character of Erdely's story, who "had already been interviewed by the Washington Post for a story that has not yet run." (Slate) | If the men Jackie accuses of rape "were being cited in the story for mere drunkenness, boorish frat-boy behavior or similar collegiate misdemeanors, then there’d be no harm in failing to secure their input," Erik Wemple writes. "The charge in this piece, however, is gang rape, and so requires every possible step to reach out and interview them, including e-mails, phone calls, certified letters, FedEx letters, UPS letters and, if all of that fails, a knock on the door.

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Rolling Stone didn’t contact the men it accused of rape

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Why didn’t Rolling Stone contact frat boys it accused of rape?

    Sabrina Rubin Erdely told Slate she "reached out" in "multiple ways" to the guys in her blockbuster UVA story and instead spoke with a local fraternity president and a national representative. “I’m satisfied that these guys exist and are real," Rolling Stone editor Sean Woods tells Paul Farhi. We knew who they were.” Erdely tells Farhi, "by dwelling on this, you’re getting sidetracked." (WP) | If an article "plays to rather than challenges your biases, you should subject it to tougher scrutiny," Judith Shulevitz writes about Erdely's account of the rape of a main character named Jackie. "What we don't know is whether every detail of Jackie's story, as told to Rolling Stone, is true; by not contacting the alleged rapists, Erdely opened the article up to questions." (TNR)

  2. More NYT buyout names trickle out

    Interactive news desk editor Lexi Mainland and photographer Fred R.

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Who is taking NYT buyouts?

Dec. 1 was New York Times’ employees’ deadline to apply for one of the 100 buyouts the company offered.

Sports reporter Barry Bearak confirms to Poynter he’s applied for the buyout. Edward Wyatt in the Times’ Washington, D.C., bureau tells Poynter he’s applied. Ron Wertheimer, on the Culture desk, says he is retiring as part of the buyout. Fellow Culture deskers David DeWitt, Christopher Phillips and Ray Cormier say they have applied.

David Geary, the late news desk editor for the past decade, applied and will leave on Dec. 19. Don Hecker, an editor in the Times newsroom’s administration unit (and a cofounder of the New York Times Student Journalism Institute) is taking the buyout.

Assistant business editor Jack Lynch says we can add him to our list.

Interactive news desk editor Lexi Mainland tells Poynter she is taking the buyout, as is photographer Fred R. Read more

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NYT edges closer to layoffs

Good morning. Almost there. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. NYT may have layoffs, after all

    A memo from Janet Elder says the news org may not have enough buyout applications to forgo layoffs. "Early efforts to handicap the outcome regrettably point to having to do some layoffs." Also, if you take the buyout, MOMA will not let you in for free anymore. (Mother Jones) | Last month Keith J. Kelly reported that more than 300 people had filed buyout applications, but many were "just securing their rights and checking it out," Guild unit rep Grant Glickson said. (NY Post) | Floyd Norris is taking the buyout. (Talking Biz News) | More N.Y. Guild news: Eight Guild members who worked at Reuters' Insider video project are losing their jobs. (The Newspaper Guild of New York) | Time Inc. has declared it's at an "impasse" with the union and "can begin unilaterally imposing many of the terms, including the right to farm out up to 60 full-time jobs while slashing vacation and medical benefits and eliminating voluntary buyout provisions from future layoffs." The Guild has asked the NLRB to investigate.

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Let the talk of NYT buyouts begin

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Let the talk of NYT buyouts begin

    No newsroom names yet, but "but news of potential or likely takers are spreading among their colleagues." On the business side, Yasmin Namini and Tom Carley are confirmed takers. Application deadline is Dec. 1. (Capital)

  2. Get ready to cover Ferguson again

    One thing you might want to do: Learn the difference between "downtown" St. Louis and the Loop. (Reuters) | "Learn basics. Or we're sending our people to report on Manhattan entirely from Staten Island." (@sarahkendzior) | Kristen Hare gave you some basics about the region back in August. (Poynter) | She's still updating her Twitter list of journalists in the region. | Reread this if you get a sec: "How municipalities in St. Louis County, Mo., profit from poverty" (WP)

  3. "#pointergate" continues

    KSTP's report is "truly an example of shoddy journalism," Brian Stelter says.

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Fox News crushed competitors on election night

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Fox News beat broadcast networks on election night

    It also crushed in 2010, the last Republican wave. (NYT) | "Fox News is normally the dominant player in cable news, but its high ratings on Tuesday may have been partly influenced by the nature of the 2014 electorate." (Politico) | Related: "Think of the GOP’s Senate takeover as a full-employment act for Washington reporters," Jack Shafer writes. (Reuters)

  2. Earnings season update

    News Corp saw overall revenues rise, but ad revenue at its print newspapers fell 7 percent over the same period the year before. Strong results at its book division (including recently acquired Harlequin) and other businesses drove an overall growth in revenue at the spun-off company. (Capital) | Torstar, which sold Harlequin to News Corp, saw a 7 percent drop in revenue over all.

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Reporter declines to reapply for her job, gets laid off

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Reporter declines to reapply for her job, gets laid off Burlington Free Press reporter Lynn Monty decided not to consummate the process of reapplying for her job last week. The Free Press, like many other Gannett papers, has asked staffers to reapply for jobs in reimagined “newsrooms of the future.” “I loved my job, but I don’t love Gannett,” Monty tells Paul Heintz. “I will make a new way for myself that doesn’t compromise my integrity.” (Seven Days)
  2. The last circulation report The Alliance for Audited Media will release its final print Snapshot report today. Because of more rule changes, “we advise against comparing year-over-year data,” AAM cautions. (AAM) | I wrote last October about how some other recent rules made comparisons difficult. (Poynter)
  3. Two attempts to explain why your friend Gordon is blue over the Jian Ghomeshi mess Canadians have an ” intrinsic and profound” relationship with the CBC, and the scandal further diminishes the institution, Adam Sternbergh writes.
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Rainbow Room Reopening

N.Y. publishers mull more layoffs

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. More layoffs may come at New York publishers: “Industry executives are spending the month of October in closed-door meetings as they look for ways to tighten their belts even more.” (WWD) | Related: Time Inc. management “wants the ability to send 160 editorial jobs overseas,” Newspaper Guild of New York President Bill O’Meara says. (Capital) | Meta related: New owner Jay Penske‘s plan for WWD. (Capital) | Related sad trombone: “The joy we get from throwing magazines away seems like a bad sign for their future,” Laura Hazard Owen writes. (Gigaom)
  2. NBC News crew quarantined: They worked with freelance cameraman Ashoka Mukpo in Liberia and “Officials said the order was issued late Friday after the crew members violated an agreement to voluntarily confine themselves.” No one’s shown any signs of the disease.
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Earns Gannett

Gannett shifts some costs of USA Today layoffs to states

USA Today laid off about 70 people last month. Those who lost their jobs received a week of pay for every year of service, health care through the end of September and the vacation pay they’d already accrued for the year.

But as they turned in their laptops and cellphones, some USA Today journalists were surprised to find out who would pay a chunk of their farewell package: their state unemployment office.

USA Today is owned by Gannett, which doesn’t always pay laid-off workers a traditional severance. Instead, as in the case of the recent layoffs, it may provide a “transitional pay plan.” In one of these plans, Gannett, through a contractor called Total Management Solutions, makes up the difference between a worker’s old paycheck and their unemployment check for a certain amount of time.

Gannett didn’t make anyone available for an interview on this subject, but spokesperson Jeremy Gaines told Poynter in an email that “The Transitional Pay Plan (TPP) is one type of severance plan that Gannett offers. Read more

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CNN will cut 300 jobs

CNN | USA Today

CNN Worldwide will cut about 300 positions, Brian Stelter reports. Its parent company, Turner Broadcasting, wants to reduce its number of employees by about 10 percent.

About 130 of the CNN cuts are coming from buyouts, Stelter writes. The remainder “will be cut through layoffs.”

Turner is in turn owned by Time Warner. USA Today media columnist Michael Wolff wrote Sunday that Time Warner CEO Jeffrey Bewkes wants to raise the company’s stock price, and “the fast way to $100 a share is the kind of deep cost-cutting that this relatively complaisant company has never been known for.” Read more

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