Articles about "Live chats"


Ferrara_Lou_AP

Live chat replay: What sports journalists need to know to compete

In remarks for the College Media Association conference in New York on March 13, Associated Press Vice President Lou Ferrara issued a wake-up call for sports reporters.

He said traditional sports journalism is changing, that game coverage is waning and that general news coverage is what the AP and others need now. Ferrara joined us in a Poynter careers chat at 2 p.m. ET Wednesday to map out the needs.

Ferrara helps the AP orchestrate coverage of big-time sports events like the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi and he has some very specific tips about how sports journalists can get ready for the craft’s future needs.

A replay of the chat is below.

Visit www.poynter.org/chats to find an archive of all past chats.

Read more

Tools:
0 Comments
chat green glossy icon on white background

Chat replay: covering pot when recreational use is legalized

As states move to lift local bans on marijuana use, reporters and editors are increasingly faced with the question of how to cover the drug as more than a crime story.

Communities where pot is legal are faced with a complex set of issues like preventing underage access to the drug, appropriately regulating the supply chain, determining where growers and distributors should be located, and enforcing bans that prevent citizens from taking marijuana out of state in cars and on airplanes.

Journalists from two states that have legalized recreational marijuana — Colorado and Washington — talked about their approaches to covering the regulation, business, consumption and consequences of legalized medical and recreational marijuana.

Ricardo Baca, editor of The Denver Post’s marijuana website and of its pot coverage, and Bob Young, who writes about marijuana for The Seattle Times, joined Poynter’s Kelly McBride to discuss the challenges they encounter following pot’s legalization.… Read more

Tools:
0 Comments
chat green glossy icon on white background

Understanding opportunities and challenges in sponsored content (Replay chat)

Shane Snow, cofounder with two friends of Contently, manages a network of 25,000 freelancers. According to Contently’s website, the sweet spot where these freelancers thrive is creating content for “brands, nonprofits, and lean new media companies.”

Snow and his team, described as a mashup of journalists and nerds, are on the front edge of branded content or native advertising.

Forbes, a Contently client, recognized Snow this month in “30 under 30: These People are Building the Media Companies of Tomorrow.”

Snow joined us for a live chat on the opportunities, challenges and values of sponsored content.

Participants asked Snow about the ins and outs of branded content.

Twitter users can participate in any Poynter live chat using the hashtag #poynterchats. You can revisit this page at any time to replay the chat after it has ended.… Read more

Tools:
1 Comment
Journalists can learn how to use Medicare surveys of their local hospitals to develop stories about the quality of the care they provide. (Depositphotos)

How to tap into patient reviews of local hospitals

If you haven’t examined how your local hospitals performed in the latest Medicare surveys, you’re missing out on some important stories with high likely readership.

Jordan Rau of Kaiser Health News joined us for a chat on how journalists can use the surveys.

The surveys, one of the first parts of the Affordable Care Act, probe patient attitudes on such questions as how carefully doctors and nurses listened to them, how often they were treated with courtesy and respect, how well their pain was controlled and, among other things, where they’d rate the hospital on a scale from “worst hospital possible” to “best hospital possible.”

The results of the surveys are used to provide more than 2,500 hospitals nationwide with federal government bonuses or penalties, depending on the survey results.… Read more

Tools:
1 Comment
Chat

Restoring trust after big mistakes like CBS’ Benghazi whopper

When a newsroom makes a big mistake, it’s a sign that something in its newsgathering process went awry. With trust between journalists and the audience they serve so fragile, it’s crucial that newsrooms take significant and swift action after major mistakes.

In this chat, we’ll talk about what CBS could do after significant doubts emerged about the veracity of a source used in its 60 Minutes’ story on the U.S. compound attack in Benghazi.

Keep reading to explore how corrections and clarifications can be among the best tools (in addition to accuracy) for establishing and maintaining audience trust.

Read more

Tools:
0 Comments
rpc

Have you lost that writing feeling? Is it gone, gone, gone…?

The dialogue with a stranger on a plane often goes something like this:

Stranger:  “What do you do for a living?”
Me:  “I’m a teacher.”
Stranger:  “What do you teach?”
Me: “I teach writing.”

The response from the stranger is almost predictable. Odd looks. Nervous laughter. Usually followed by an admission that he doesn’t like to write, or that she tried to write in school once but it didn’t work out, or that he has to write as part of his job — but hates it.

Even professional writers will confess their loss of passion for their craft.

So do we hate writing? Or does writing hate us?

This feeling has many different names: writing anxiety, writing apprehension, writers’ block, paralyzing procrastination, aversive conditioning. … Read more

Tools:
1 Comment
Chat

Why stories need a focus … or do they?

If there is one writing lesson that Poynter has taught for more than three decades now, it’s that good stories need a sharp focus.

I once heard my friend Chip Scanlan say that all parts of the writing process amount to these three words: focus, focus, focus.

We focus the:

  • Story idea
  • Reporting
  • Structure
  • Ending
  • Language
  • Revision

And, yes, we probably even focus the focus.

I have compared focus to the way that the eyedoctor tests you for new lenses. The image is supposed to get sharper and sharper with each slight correction.

But there’s always a big but, isn’t there?

How do we account for great works of art that defy all attempts to declare a focus? Does Hamlet have a focus? Or Moby Dick?… Read more

Tools:
2 Comments
Chat

Exploring the new role of developer advocate

In today’s career chat, we’ll talk with Chrys Wu, who has just been named The New York Times’ developer advocate.

Wu has worked in a variety of media and roles, pushing the envelope for digital journalism. Her work includes development, audience development and digital storyteller. From 3 to 4 p.m. ET, we will talk about how developers contribute to news reports, why they need an advocate and how advocates can benefit newsrooms.

Twitter users can ask questions ahead of time using the hashtag #poynterchats. You can revisit this page at any time to replay the chat after it has ended.

 

// … Read more

Tools:
0 Comments
Chat

What it takes to make hyperlocal journalism work

AOL’s decision to close or sell unprofitable Patch sites and lay off staffers has renewed attention to hyperlocal journalism in recent weeks.

Dr. Michelle Ferrier, associate dean for innovation, research/creative activity and graduate studies at Ohio University’s Scripps College of Communication, is tracking how the Patch changes have affected the hyperlocal news landscape. She has done research and writing on hyperlocal news throughout the years and has a lot of ideas about what it takes to make this type of journalism work.

She shared some of her ideas in a live chat, which you can replay here:

 

// … Read more

Tools:
0 Comments
Chat

How to write longform stories

You knew it was only a matter of time until the author of “How to Write Short” would turn his attention to “How to Write Long.”

It turns out that long and short writing are not necessarily in conflict. Think for a moment about your favorite magazines. Compared to newspapers, the long stories in magazines are longer, and the shorter pieces are shorter. It’s the combination of short and long that make a publication versatile for readers.

Although I’ve met some writers who tell me “I want to write shorter,” that is the exception.  Most writers I know — including me — want to go longer. The daily beat reporter wants to do a Sunday feature. The Sunday feature writer wants to do a series.… Read more

Tools:
1 Comment