Articles about "Magazines"


Digital editions up slightly at U.S. magazines

AAM

Digital edition circulation rose at U.S. magazines in the first half of 2014, according to the Alliance for Audited Media’s most recent report. But digital editions represented only 3.8 percent of total circulation, compared with 3.3 percent in June 2013. Paid subscriptions fell nearly 2 percent, AAM’s Neal Lulofs writes. Single copy sales fell about 12 percent.

AARP The Magazine and the AARP Bulletin were the top magazines in the U.S. Both saw circulation gains. Circulation at Game Informer Magazine, the fourth-biggest title, fell 9 percent, but was still relatively massive: 7,099,452. GameStop owns Game Informer and bundles subscriptions to it with the chain’s paid loyalty card, Michael Sebastian reported last year.

The Top 10 magazines (and their total paid, verified, analyzed and non-paid circulation):

  1. AARP The Magazine (22,837,736, up 4.1 percent)
  2. AARP Bulletin (22,183,316, up 2.2 percent)
  3. Better Homes and Gardens (7,639,661, up .2 percent)
  4. Game Informer Magazine (7,099,452, down 9.3 percent)
  5. Good Housekeeping (4,315,330, down 1.9 percent)
  6. Family Circle (4,015,728, flat)
  7. National Geographic (3,572,348, down 10.7 percent)
  8. People (3,510,533, down .9 percent)
  9. Reader’s Digest (3,393,573, down 35.3 percent)
  10. Woman’s Day (3,288,335, down 3.1 percent)

Some news magazine stats:

  • Time‘s circulation was down about half a percentage point, to 3,286,467.
Read more
Tools:
0 Comments
Screen Shot 2014-03-24 at 9.02.44 AM

‘Remake, remodel:’ 3 ways the digital revolution has changed women’s magazines

Brooke Erin Duffy remembers her first meeting with Seventeen magazine. She was 12, at her grandparent’s house and totally entranced.

Duffy, an assistant professor in the School of Media and Communication at Temple University, writes about that introduction in her book “Remake Remodel: Women’s Magazines in the Digital Age.”

Indeed, I recall a flurry of emotions as I read through that early ’90s issue of “Seventeen” again and again; with the benefit of hindsight, I can identify this as a powerful cocktail of envy and inadequacy, hope and aspiration. And so began my close, albeit conflicted, relationship with women’s magazines.

Read more
Tools:
3 Comments
Magazines, including a Rolling Stone issue featuring president-elect Barack Obama, are displayed at a newsstand Wednesday, Jan. 14, 2009 in New York. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

Magazine industry ad decline slowing, but 4th quarter not good

The final tally came in this week for print magazine advertising in 2013. It is the typical good news/bad news scenario.

Ad pages — the industry’s traditional measure — were down 4.1 percent for the year. That could be read as a step forward from 2012 when the decline was 8.2 percent.

Quarterly year-to-year comparisons had improved through the year, with the third quarter off just 1.8 percent compared to a year earlier, the best performance in two years. But the fourth quarter headed back the wrong way, off 4.8 percent, indicating marketing budget cuts at year’s end and perhaps a below par holiday season.

The weak fourth quarter at magazines suggests that newspaper ad results for the period, which will be reported by public companies in February and for the industry in March will probably soften too.

We will return to the overall measures in a minute, but here is a tasty tidbit.  Read more

Tools:
0 Comments
modern-farmer-featureimage

For Modern Farmer, farm stands hold more promise than newsstands

When Modern Farmer launched its GoatCam in September, Editor-in-Chief Ann Marie Gardner was surprised to hear from people working at the Pentagon.

“They had a suggestion for changing the angle of the camera so they could see the goats better,” Gardner said in a phone interview.

Gardner (Photo by David Harriman)

Modern Farmer is proving adept at finding audiences in places one wouldn’t expect. Since launching this past April, its article on why cow-tipping is nearly impossible has become a viral hit, BuzzFeed’s Katie Notopoulos has written about how to behave at a farmers market and President Clinton has jawed about farming in its pages. (He remembers he once “badly lost a head-butting contest to a ram.”)

The Hudson, N.Y.-based publication offers a daily report online as well as a quarterly print magazine. Its target audience isn’t just urban weenies obsessing about kale, but people who are interested in the stories behind their food. Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

Playboy among most accurate magazines, Grammarly finds

The editing service Grammarly looked at articles in top men’s and women’s magazines, checking for “spelling, grammar and punctuation errors.” The most accurate men’s magazine it found was GQ. Ladies’ Home Journal was the most accurate women’s title. Playboy was No. 4 on Grammarly’s list of accurate men’s magazines, the same position held by Family Circle on its list of women’s mags.

Click the infographic below to view it bigger: Read more

Tools:
2 Comments

The New Yorker features two moms on its Mother’s Day cover

The New Yorker

The artist Chris Ware writes about his cover for the magazine’s May 13 issue, which shows two moms reading a card:

Few people today don’t know—or have in their families—at least one loving couple who are raising children, same-sex or not. And it’s really just the loving part that matters. That same-sex marriage could go from its preliminary draft of “diagnosable” to the final edit of “so what?” must indicate some positive evolution on the part of the larger human consciousness.

Perhaps coincidentally, May 6 marked the one-year anniversary of Vice President Biden saying he was “absolutely comfortable” with gay marriage, an event said to have pushed President Obama to express his own public support. Read more

Tools:
0 Comments
Magazines2

2013 National Magazine Awards widen scope, and women win

The Huffington Post | Jezebel | ASME

At the American Society of Magazine Editors awards Thursday night, Dahlia Lithwick won for commentary and Pamela Colloff won for feature writing. No women won either category last year because no women were nominated in them.

ASME Chief Executive Sid Holt told Poynter last year that criticism of the awards’ nominations, which failed to nominate women in the feature writing, reporting, profile writing, essays and criticism or columns and commentary categories, was “kind of silly.” And yet this year’s nominations were far more representative of the industry they survey.

It’s depressing that ‘women write good stuff’ is news, and it feels silly to congratulate ASME for doing its job,” Katie J.M. Baker wrote in Jezebel earlier this month, “but it’s a dramatic improvement, and we’re psyched.”

The awards’ categories still consider magazines aimed at men in “News, Sports and Entertainment Magazines,” while it considers magazines aimed at women in the “Service and Fashion Magazines” category. Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

Esquire editor says photos of women are like ‘pictures of cool cars’

The Guardian | New York

Alex Bilmes, who edits Esquire’s U.K. edition, claimed in a panel on feminism in London that his magazine was “more honest” in its portrayal of women than the rest of the industry. And by that he seemingly meant Esquire is upfront about its objectification of women.

From The Guardian:

“The women we feature in the magazine are ornamental,” he said, speaking on a panel at the Advertising Week Europe conference in London on Tuesday. “I could lie to you if you want and say we are interested in their brains as well. We are not. They are objectified.”  …

“[Esquire] provide pictures of girls in the same way we provide pictures of cool cars,” he said. “It is ornamental. Women’s magazines do the same thing.”

Bilmes later tweeted to ASOS women’s fashion and beauty editor Danielle Radojcin and singer Lily Allen that “actually I said ‘mental’ not ‘ornamental’ but was misquoted,” an apparent attempt at a joke, because Guardian video clearly shows otherwise. Read more

Tools:
1 Comment

Reports: Meredith in talks to buy most Time Warner magazines

Fortune | The New York Times

“A serious buyer is in talks with” Time Warner about buying most of its magazine properties, James Bandler, Doris Burke and Jennifer Reingold report in Fortune. The deal is in “a formative stage and may never come to fruition,” they write.

Meredith Corporation is the potential buyer, Amy Chozick reports in The New York Times.

The deal being discussed would allow Time Warner to hang onto three flagship magazines, Time, Fortune and Sports Illustrated, while selling the majority of its portfolio, including magazines like Real Simple, Entertainment Weekly, Cooking Light and InStyle. The titles, which amount to essentially a women’s magazine company, make a good fit for Meredith Corporation, based in Des Moines, Iowa, and the publisher of such titles as Better Homes and Gardens and Ladies’ Home Journal.

Read more
Tools:
0 Comments

Huffington iPad mag stops charging, renewing concern about readers’ willingness to pay

Capital New York | GigaOM
The Huffington Post’s new weekly iPad magazine — originally priced at 99 cents / $1.99 a month / $19.99 a year — is dropping its price to zero after five issues, Joe Pompeo reports. AOL claims about 115,000 downloads of the app, Pompeo writes, but it wasn’t clear how many of those ever paid for an issue (the first month came free).

The moves comes shortly after The Daily, News Corp.’s iPad-only newsmagazine, laid off 50 staffers and scaled back content.

Mathew Ingram’s analysis is that single-source apps “don’t fit the way content works anymore”:

Whether media companies like it or not (and they mostly don’t), much of the news and other content we consume now comes via links shared through Twitter and Facebook and other networks, or through old-fashioned aggregators — such as Yahoo News or Google News — and newer ones like Flipboard and Zite and Prismatic that are tailored to mobile devices and a socially-driven news experience.

Read more
Tools:
0 Comments
Page 1 of 71234567