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management

NEWS

How to manage a 'newsroom star' and keep everyone happy

This is the core message of my teaching: The most important things leaders do is help other people succeed. So what happens when they indeed succeed, and in a really big way? What's your responsibility when a member of your team builds a massive fan base, wins coveted awards, or rakes in high revenues for your organization? Congratulations, You get … Read More
NEWS

Be a Better Listener in 3 Minutes

I work with managers and non-managers alike who want to become better at listening. I've read books on it, written columns, and teach sessions on the essentials of the skill. And then I met journalist E. S. Isaac of India and got a better education on what it means to truly listen. During a dinner conversation before … Read More
NEWS

5 reasons managers are addicted to "fixing" - and how to recover

I admit it. I'm a recovering fixer. Show me a piece of copy and my fingers get itchy. I crave contact with a keyboard, with a gnawing urge to tweak someone's writing a little -- or maybe a lot. Then I remind myself of the pledge I took years ago: "Remember, Jill. Sit on your hands. Coach, … Read More
NEWS

Why do journalists remember nasty editors fondly?

Dean Baquet said it was "nuts" to elegize "'the city editor who changed my life because he was really nasty to me for six months and it made me a better person.'" I noted earlier today that John Robinson had recently tweeted some wisdom about the peculiar devotion some journalists have for tough editors, but I was curious what Jill Geisler, who directs Poynter's management and leadership training programs, thought about J. Jonah Jameson types. Geisler recently wrote about what a good management style looks like, and talked about the "bad old days" when "bosses could be behave like tyrants" as long as their team "cranked out some good work." She didn't dwell on those days in the piece, though, so I put it to her: Why do so many journalists think fondly of jerks? Here's what she wrote back: The fond remembrances are very likely the result of several things: 1. It’s all seen through the rear view mirror. Those who are fondly recalling their super-tough, idiosyncratic bosses are proud of their survival, just like those who make it through fraternity or sorority hazing. They put greater emphasis on the positive outcome and tell war stories about the hardship. There’s a “coolness” factor to telling those “I was one of Mr. or Ms. X’s crew — what a wild ride that was. If you made it there, you know you had what it takes." Read More
NEWS

Great journalist or great manager: Who would you prefer for a boss?

I am going to begin this essay on leadership with an extended baseball analogy. I realize that this will make my argument sound “gendered,” and not in a good way, but I’ll take my chances. There are a lot of good baseball managers out there, and one of them is Joe Maddon, skipper of our local team the Tampa Bay … Read More
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