Marcus Brauchli

Washington Post looks toward national audience with Kindle Fire app

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Washington Post looks toward national audience with new Kindle Fire app

    This is important: It will not provide local news. Updates every day at 5 a.m. and 5 p.m. Free for six months, a buck for the next six months. (WP) | Post people said owner Jeff Bezos "had made it clear, through meetings with executives and through feedback on ideas and proposals, that The Post’s broad strategy should shift toward growing its national and international audience — in direct contrast to its previous mission of narrowing its focus to local news." (NYT) | The Post also launched "BrandConnect Perspective" Thursday, a native advertising initiative for opinion pieces. First up is Bayer, with "Modern Agriculture is Based on Sound Science." (WP) | Related: Former Post Executive Editor Marcus Brauchli's North Base Media is an investor in Inkl, a "Spotify for media content." (StartupSmart)

  2. Bill Cosby and the media

    "I think if you want to consider yourself to be serious, it will not appear anywhere," he warns Brett Zongker after declining to comment on rape allegations. (AP) | Ta-Nehisi Coates: "I would not dismiss all journalists who've declined to mention these allegations as cowards." (The Atlantic) | Cosby, Terrence Howard, R. Kelly: "a lot of arts writing is PR driven, and talk of arrests and assaults is off-message," Bill Wyman wrote earlier this month. "But that doesn’t excuse the straight news sections’ inability to relate the basic facts of these cases." (CJR)

  3. Reuters lets Jack Shafer go

    “I’m fine,” the media columnist told Poynter. “My philosophy is that the job belongs to the employer. When they want to do something else with the money, that’s their prerogative.” (Poynter) | "Ours is a great business," Shafer tells Peter Sterne. "I’d take your job." (Capital) | Thomson Reuters plans to eliminate as many as 55 editorial jobs. (BuzzFeed)

  4. The Uber stories continue

    Michael Wolff invited BuzzFeed EIC Ben Smith to the dinner for "influentials" where a company executive mused publicly about spending a million bucks to dig up dirt on a critical journalist. The night "was a convivial evening" and "Smith's portrait is at odds with the event," he writes. (USA Today) | Dylan Byers: "it's troubling to watch the digital lynch mob on Twitter promote the idea that a man should be fired from his job because he floated an idea, however unsavory, over dinner." (Politico) | Silicon Valley publications are in a tight spot with this and similar stories because "many of these publications make a significant portion of their revenue from live events and conferences that feature appearances by the big-name tech executives they cover. Some publications also rely on investments from venture capital firms that have stakes in the start-ups they cover." (NYT) | What Uber drivers make. (BuzzFeed) | U.S. Sen. Al Franken writes the company, asks whether it disciplined the blabby executive, Emil Michael. (Al Franken) | Uber's more guarded about customer data when New York's taxi commission wants it than, say, when it wants to blog about "Rides of Glory." (Capital)

  5. MailOnline will rip off Daily Mail's name

    Kidding, kidding, they're part of the same publication. MailOnline has massive traffic but profitability eludes. So it will become DailyMail.com in the U.S. to help bridge the brand gap. CEO Jon Steinberg plans to goose sales of native ads, which MailOnline reporters create. (WSJ)

  6. It's Old Newsboys Day in St. Louis

    Volunteers sell a special newspaper this morning around town to help raise money for local children's charities. Here's where you can find a newsboy: (St. Louis Post-Dispatch)

  7. Media orgs are obsessed with intersections

    Erik Wemple takes apart the cliché. (WP)

  8. Watch your pens around Josh Mankeiwicz

    The NBC News reporter bombs a lie detector test when asked about stealing office supplies. (NBC News)

  9. Front page of the day, curated by Kristen Hare

    A Depew, New York, resident tries to tunnel out. More snow is falling. Also, the band Interpol is stuck. (Courtesy the Newseum)

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  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin

    Anthony DeMaio is now publisher of Slate. Previously, he was president of national sales there. (Politico) | Chelsea Janes will cover the Washington Nationals for The Washington Post. She covers high school sports there. (Washington Post) | Sophia Papaioannou is now editorial director at HuffPost Greece. She hosts "360 Degrees". Nikos Agouros is now editor-in-chief of HuffPost Greece. Previously, he was editor-in-chief of VimaMen. (Huffington Post) | Steve Unger will be interim CEO at Ofcom. He is director of strategy, international technology and economy there. (The Guardian) | The Associated Press is looking for a supervisory correspondent in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org.

Corrections? Tips? Please email me: abeaujon@poynter.org. Would you like to get this roundup emailed to you every morning? Sign up here.

Correction: This post originally said the Post's Kindle app would cost $1 per month after a trial period. Six months' access will cost $1 after the trial period. Read more

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Carr: Weymouth is the problem at Washington Post

The New York Times | The Washington Post | Nieman | New York | Adweek
Last week’s change in editorial leadership at The Washington Post was “mishandled from the start,” David Carr writes. Publisher Katharine Weymouth, who engineered the change, “still seems to be struggling to get a grasp on a huge job at a company whose journalism has at times altered the course of a nation,” Carr says. Read more

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Marty Baron stories dwell on cuts at The Washington Post

Boston Globe Editor Marty Baron is The Washington Post’s incoming executive editor. Profiles and accounts of his ascendance all praise his journalism career, then rue the cuts that presumably face him.

• “I’m not bringing in Marty to make cuts,” Post publisher Katharine Weymouth told the Post’s Paul Farhi. “He’s managed to trim his staff without trimming the ambitions of the journalism he produces,” New York Times Executive Editor Jill Abramson says. Under Brauchli’s tenure, Farhi reports, the Post’s “budget shrank by about 30 percent” while the “newsroom staff was cut by 40 percent.” Read more

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Marcus Brauchli steps down as Washington Post executive editor, Marty Baron to take over

Washington Post | Boston Globe | Poynter
After months of speculation, Marcus Brauchli is stepping down as executive editor of The Washington Post. Boston Globe Editor Marty Baron, 58, will be the new editor as of January 2.

Managing Editor Liz Spayd was scheduled to leave by the end of the year, but will stay through January 31 to assist in the transition between editors.

Brauchli will take a position as a “vice president of The Washington Post Company with responsibility for evaluating new media opportunities,” the Post’s Paul Farhi reports. Read more

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