Articles about "McClatchy"


Tim Cook; iPhone 6; iPhone 6 Plus

Apple’s iPhone Plus doesn’t spell doom for tablet design

Critics have long groused about the death of the tablet’s use in news design. Jon Lund pronounced tablet magazines “a failure” in a 2013 GigaOM article, declaring that the “app-based tablet approach to magazines leads straight to oblivion.”

When News Corp’s iPad newspaper, The Daily, was discontinued in 2012, Tech Crunch ran an article titled “Why magazine apps suck” that rattled off a list of problems plaguing tablet publications: large file sizes, lack of imagination from developers and a failure to reach the sizable audience of iPad readers.

In recent weeks, rumors of a new iPhone with a larger screen began circulating in advance of today’s Apple event, prompting industry watchers to forecast dark days ahead for the tablet. Marketwatch’s Quentin Fottrell called the new phone “a big risk for Apple,” quoting an analyst who said the larger screen might cannibalize the iPad market. The Motley Fool’s Tim Brugger agreed, writing that large-screen phones might eat into the sales of tablets and mini-tablets. Read more

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Ad revenue down at McClatchy

The McClatchy Co.

Advertising revenue was down 7 percent in the second quarter of 2014 at the McClatchy Co., which released earnings Thursday. “Audience” revenue, which is what McClatchy now calls circulation revenue, was up about 5 percent. Excluding revenue from McClatchy’s change to fee-for-service circulation delivery contracts at some newspapers, circulation revenue was down about 3 percent.

“Still, we continued to see growth in direct marketing and digital advertising revenues and together these two sources accounted for 43% of our total advertising revenue in the quarter,” McClatchy CEO Pat Talamantes said in a statement.

McClatchy’s results include $146 million it made by selling its share of Apartments.com and, “to a lesser extent,” its share in in McClatchy‑Tribune Information Services. Tribune bought out McClatchy’s share in MCT in May. McClatchy also completed the sale of the Anchorage Daily News, which recently changed its name.

For the first six months of the year, advertising revenue was down about 7 percent over last year. Audience revenue was down about 1 percent. Read more

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White House criticizes Washington Post’s use of anonymous sources

In a briefing Monday, White House press secretary Josh Earnest criticized a Washington Post story for relying on anonymous sources. According to a transcript of the briefing, McClatchy reporter Anita Kumar pushed back at Earnest, noting that the Post didn’t have anyone at the briefing to defend the story.

“I noticed that, too,” Earnest said.

Earnest later allowed that there were people on the record in the story, which says White House aides knew a year ago that a crisis was developing on the U.S.-Mexico border, but they instead “focused much of their attention on political battles, such as Obama’s 2012 reelection campaign and the push to win congressional support for a broad immigration overhaul, that would have been made more difficult with the addition of a high-profile border crisis.”

“[Y]ou criticize anonymous sources, but we have anonymous sources from you all every day,” Kumar said.

“I’m not suggesting that they shouldn’t run their story,” Earnest said of the Post. “It’s not my place to suggest that the people who represent that empty seat right there can make their own decisions about what stories to run. They’re entirely entitled to doing that.” He continued:

What I think is important is that greater weight should be granted to those who are willing to put a face and a name with specific claims. Cecilia Munoz, who’s the president’s top immigration adviser, is in that story, conveying exactly the White House position. And I’ve spent the last hour in here talking to all of you because of putting my face and my name with this administration’s positions.

And in the course of reporting, I think it’s important, based on my own personal view, for those kinds of quotes and those kinds of stories to be given greater weight than just anonymous sources.

AP reporter Julie Pace asked: “So, Josh, would you guys commit then, when you have situations like today’s call, which is people specifically picked by the White House to roll out a policy of the White House, would you commit to have those people speak on the record?”

“Well,” Earnest replied, “I — what I will commit to is a case by case evaluation of — of the background or the ground rules of each of these kinds of calls and a commitment to an open dialogue with you about the ground rules that will serve your interests and the White House interests the best.”

Cameron Barr, national editor at the Post, responded to Earnest’s criticism in an email to Poynter:

Josh Earnest says that that we gave greater weight in our story to “anonymous outside voices,” as opposed to “on the record sources from the White House,” but the criticism doesn’t make sense. The lead anecdote is on the record; the first quote comes from a named former Border Patrol official. His quote is closely followed by lengthy quotes from domestic policy adviser Cecilia Munoz. One of the most prominent outside voices in the piece is that of Michelle Brané, director of migrant rights at the Women’s Refugee Commission, and she is of course quoted by name.

We are sometimes compelled to rely on background sources with knowledge of internal deliberations – that is one of the best means available to hold the administration and other powerful institutions to account. We press sources to speak for the record whenever possible, but they are often unwilling to risk their livelihoods in order to make their views known.

As to our chair being empty today – we staff the briefing very consistently. On the rare occasion when we are not there, as was the case today, we cover the briefing remotely.

New York Times reporter Peter Baker noted on Twitter that the exchange came at an awkward time:

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Tribune buys out McClatchy’s stake in MCT newswire

Tribune Publishing “will take full ownership” of McClatchy Tribune Information Services” and its operations will move to Chicago, McClatchy vice president for news and Washington editor Anders Gyllenhaal tells staffers in a memo. “MCT will consolidate editorial and business staffs in Chicago and merge with the Tribune Content Agency, creating a single business out of the two related operations,” he writes.

“A portion of the jobs based in Washington will be part of the ongoing wire service or remain with the bureau. But a majority of the Washington positions will be phased out over the course of the summer as the move to Chicago is complete,” Gyllenhaal writes.

In a press release, Tribune said “MCT products and services will become part of the offerings of Tribune Content Agency.”

McClatchy’s D.C. staff was due to meet at 11:45 today. “The MCT changes don’t have any impact on the bureau,” Gyllenhaal writes in an email to Poynter. “Also, McClatchy’s connections the wire service remain much the same: we’re contributors, we work closely with the service and we’re the largest client. We’re no longer an owner, and instead become a preferred customer.”

McClatchy has shed several assets in recent months. It sold its stake in Classified Ventures’ Apartments.com for $147 million on April 1 and agreed to sell the Anchorage Daily News on April 8. Meanwhile, Tribune’s publishing arm has been on an acquisition spree of late — its Baltimore Sun Media Group recently agreed to purchase papers in Maryland, and the Hartford Courant agreed in March to purchase a publisher of weekly papers in Connecticut.

Tribune Co. plans to split its newspaper and broadcasting properties. It “expects acquisitions to be ‘an important component of our business strategy,’” Dean Starkman reported Wednesday.

Memo follows: Read more

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McClatchy explains change in circulation revenue

The McClatchy Company

Circulation revenue was up nearly 6 percent in McClatchy’s first quarter, the company said in a report Wednesday. But, the report said, that revenue was up less than 1 percent “excluding the $4.3 million in revenue related to the transition to fee-for-service circulation delivery contracts at certain newspapers.”

Reached by email, McClatchy Director of Investors Relations Ryan Kimball said some of the company’s newspapers “transitioned to a different circulation contract” during the first quarter. The contracts are fee for service, which for accountants means their “delivery expenses are no longer netted against circulation revenues and thus makes the reported circulation revenue higher.” So some of the papers had higher revenues and higher delivery expenses, he said. The change “has no impact on operating income or cash flow but we do point it out so investors can get a sense of what circulation revenues did in a given period ignoring the impact of the transition.”

Advertising reveue was down nearly 7 percent compared with the same period in 2013, McClatchy said in its report. The company said nearly half of its advertising revenue now comes from “nontraditional sources.”

The company got $147 million from its stake in Classified Ventures, which recently sold. It expects to receive $34 million from the pending sale of its Anchorage Daily News. Taxes should shrink that nut to $24 million.

Disclosure: Poynter has a training partnership with McClatchy. Read more

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Online publication buys McClatchy’s Anchorage paper

Alaska Dispatch | Anchorage Daily News

The online news publication Alaska Dispatch has reached an agreement to purchase the Anchorage Daily News from McClatchy, the companies announced Tuesday.

The purchase price was $34 million, Alex DeMarban reports for Alaska Dispatch, calling the deal a “stunning media shakeup in the 49th state.”

Alaska Dispatch “plans no changes to the Anchorage Daily News’ staff, content or distribution,” DeMarban reports.

The purchase “includes the newspaper, ADN.com and the Daily News’ building on Northway Drive in East Anchorage,” the Daily News reports. “After the purchase is finalized, the building will be sold to a private local buyer, according to a statement from Alaska Dispatch, and the Daily News will continue operations as a tenant.”

According to figures filed with the Audit Bureau of Circulations, the Anchorage Daily News’ average Sunday circulation was 45,783 in September 2013, and its average Monday through Saturday circulation was 51,539.

Here’s the press release: Read more

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Classified Ventures’ assets could be worth more than all Tribune’s papers

Crain’s Chicago Business

The sale of Apartments.com and the planned sale of Cars.com “shows how upside-down the media business has become,” Lynne Marek writes about a conversation with the investment banker Chuck DelGrande.

“The joint venture’s assets could be worth more than the value of all eight newspapers owned by Tribune,” Marek writes. “The highest price floated for Tribune’s newspaper group, which Tribune plans to spin off as Tribune Publishing Co. later this year, topped out at about $1 billion when it was on the sales block last year.”

Tribune’s 28 percent stake in Classified Ventures is worth about $700 million, William Launder reported in The Wall Street Journal last year. Apartments.com sold for $585 million earlier this month, and some of that cash went to newspaper companies like McClatchy, Gannett and A.H. Belo, as well as Graham Holdings, which used to own The Washington Post. All have stakes in Classified Ventures.

The consortium is looking for “as much as $3 billion” for Cars.com, The Wall Street Journal reported earlier this month. Read more

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Washington Post video honcho leaves for McClatchy

Senior Editor for Video Andy Pergam will leave The Washington Post to “help The McClatchy Company develop its digital video strategy,” a memo from Post Executive Editor Marty Baron and Managing Editor Emilio Garcia-Ruiz tell staffers in an email. Pergam helped launch PostTV, the company’s video initiative, which began a rethink in late 2013, moving from shows to “easily digestible segments.”

Pergam will also work on his Spark Camp project, Baron and Garcia-Ruiz say in their memo.

Full thing: Read more

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Poynter and McClatchy expand customized training program

The Poynter Institute and The McClatchy Company will expand the training program they began last year. Poynter was able to align some new teaching around McClatchy’s emphasis on news video, Poynter Director of Training Partnerships and Alliances Howard Finberg said in a phone call: “We were able to help shape the offerings for this year in support of their efforts,” he said.

McClatchy Vice President of News Anders Gyllenhaal said Poynter’s training reached “a little less than half” of the company’s journalists in the past year through three certificate programs and 11 webinars offered through Poynter’s News University.

Sacramento Bee Executive Editor Joyce Terhaar tells Poynter in an email that 54 people in its newsroom took 120 hours of Poynter classes last year. “I’m happy with that number because our big training emphasis in Sacramento last year was on our new Newsgate 3 publishing system, which involved 1,406 training hours across the room,” she writes. “With that behind us, I’m looking forward to our newsroom becoming more fully engaged with the Poynter training this year.”

“We want one year’s training to build on the next,” Gyllenhaal said in a phone call. “We want one course to build on what you’ve already taken.” Read more

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McClatchy ends year with circulation revenue up

McClatchy

Circulation revenue in 2013 was up 5 percent over the previous year, McClatchy said in its fourth-quarter and year-end earnings report. Total advertising revenue was down 6.7 percent across the company’s platforms, and down about 9 percent in print.

After taxes, McClatchy made $8.2 million on its sale of the Miami Herald’s property, the report notes. Compensation expenses were down about 7 percent compared with 2012. Revenue from McClatchy’s digital subscription program, called Plus, “provided more than $8.8 million in new revenues in the quarter and $31.4 million in total for all of 2013,” the report said. The company says it has 60,300 digital-only subscribers. Read more

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