Articles about "Misidentifications"


This BBC photo shows Neda Soltani on the left; Neda Agha-Soltan, on the right, died during protests in 2009.

Being the ‘other Neda’ destroyed a woman’s life

BBC
After Neda Agha-Soltan’s 2009 death during protests in Iran, an Iranian English-literature professor named Zahra “Neda” Soltani had the surreal experience of seeing her picture reproduced in news reports and in protests around the world, and her name used interchangeably with Agha-Soltan’s. The photo came from her Facebook page, Soltani writes in a first-person account, and writing to news organizations that contacted her didn’t stop the wrong information from spreading.

This BBC photo shows Neda Soltani on the left; Neda Agha-Soltan, on the right, died during protests in 2009.
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South Dakota’s Aberdeen American News mixes up a man accused of sexual exploitation and his lawyer:

Wrong name: Samuel A. Seeley, 21, was arrested at an Aberdeen home in January and charged with sexual exploitation of a minor and solicitation of a minor. A court story in Wednesday’s American News referenced the wrong person as having been arrested. Tom Cogley was Seeley’s attorney and was not arrested.

Aberdeen American News

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Name gaffe causes Toronto Star to accuse wrong person of plagiarism

Two weeks ago I decided I’d seen enough same name/wrong photo mistakes in the press to publish a post offering five tips that would help publications avoid this error.

I was moved to write it after seeing a spate corrections in The Independent and the Daily Mirror. Then, not long after the post was published, it happened again, this time at the MetroWest Daily News of Framingham, Mass.

In each case, the papers published a photo of a person who happened to share the same name as a protagonist in their respective stories. The worst offense by far was made by the MetroWest Daily News, which ran a photo of the wrong Angel Ortiz in a report about him being indicted on charges that included raping a child. The unindicted Mr. Ortiz subsequently decided to sue the paper.

I looked at the trend in my weekly column for the Toronto Star, which is filed on Thursday morning and appears in the Saturday paper. Read more

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A lot of love in this Talking Points Memo correction:

“Correction: This article originally misidentified the milk carton’s partner as an egg. It is, in fact, a chocolate chip cookie, as a reader pointed out. We have since corrected the error in copy and regret it.”

(Thanks for the tip, @hriefs.)

Talking Points Memo

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Attorney Scott Tenley was misidentified as Emanuel Goffer in a photo caption accompanying the continuation of an article on the government’s broad insider-trading investigation in Wednesday’s Money & Investing section. The person who was supposed to be pictured, Mr. Goffer, is a figure who was convicted in the case. Mr. Tenley is a lawyer for another figure in the case and his photo appeared in error.

A correction in the Wall Street Journal

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An archive photo showed a famous woman — aproned, holding a saucepan and contemplating several wine glasses — in a galley kitchen (Ironing lady, 30 December, page 10). Our caption read: “Margaret Thatcher, as PM, attends to domestic concerns at 10 Downing Street.” In fact, notes a reader, “the photo shows almost the opposite: it’s a publicity still from a BBC TV series called ‘Take Nobody’s Word For It. ‘ ” The reader, who worked on this 1987 series, goes on: “Mrs Thatcher is appearing as a ‘guest scientist’ doing kitchen chemistry experiments; she’s explaining that red cabbage can be used as an indicator for acid and alkali, and she’s about to pour the red cabbage water from the saucepan . . . into the wine glasses with acid, alkali and neutral liquids in them, to show the colour changes.”

A correction in The Guardian

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WSJ mistakenly puts foot (doctor) in mouth

Bravo to former Mitt Romney press secretary Kevin Madden for the RT of this correction from Journal economics editor David Wessel:

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