Articles about "Misquotes"


An Irish Daily Mail apology offers a bit of flavor from what appears to have been a spirited debate:

In our coverage yesterday of the Frontline debate on the Fiscal Treaty referendum, we stated that Norah Casey had ‘tried a cheap shot when she snidely referred to Declan Ganley’s accent, suggesting he is not as Irish as the rest of the panel’. In fact, Ms Casey had not referred to Mr Ganley’s accent. She had said: ‘I live here all year round, not just when referendums come again.’ It was Mr Ganley who claimed that Ms Casey was referring to his accent. We are happy to set the record straight and to apologise for this error.

Irish Daily Mail (via Nexis)

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Reuters corrects a misquote that said Facebook’s COO suffers from anxiety:

This story corrected paragraph 6 to show Sandberg said she sometimes gets anxious, not that she suffers from anxiety


Reuters

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The New York Times corrects a misquote of Thoreau’s “quiet desperation” line:

An article last Sunday about Alan Z. Feuer, a New Yorker who reinvented himself and was often seen at society balls, included a quotation in which one of Mr. Feuer’s society friends misattributed an aphorism. While Henry David Thoreau is often credited with variations of the aphorism “Most men lead lives of quiet desperation and die with their song still inside them,” that is not what he wrote in “Walden.” He merely said, “The mass of men lead lives of quiet desperation.” (Or to quote another Thoreau aphorism: “You must work very long to write short sentences.”)

The New York Times

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Fox News’ Steve Doocy issues an on-air correction for his misquote of President Obama:

Last week President Obama talked about not being born with a silver spoon in his mouth. That was interpreted as a big dig at Mitt Romney. When I was interviewing Governor Romney on this show I asked him about it. However, I did some paraphrasing that seemed to misquote the president. So to be clear, the president’s exact quote was, “I wasn’t born with a silver spoon in my mouth.” And I hope that clears up any confusion.

Talking Points Memo

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Pennsylvania’s Morning Call attributed a quote to Sen. Pat Toomey that was very different from his actual comment:

A story in Thursday’s paper incorrectly attributed the following quote to Sen. Pat Toomey, speaking about former Gov. Mitt Romney: “Don’t worry guys, he’s OK with me. I vetted him.” Toomey actually said: “I have had the privilege to know Gov. Romney for several years. I have studied his record very carefully. I have paid attention to this campaign. I don’t think there is any question he governed Massachusetts as a solidly fiscally conservative governor despite a very liberal Legislature.”

Morning Call

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The New York Times International Weekly corrects a mangled Sartre quote

New York Times correction: Hell is not other people at breakfast

The New York Times International Weekly, an 8 to 12-page supplement inserted in newspapers around the world, published this correction earlier in the week:

A Lens column earlier this month about introverts and extroverts misquoted the French philosopher Jean-Paul Sartre. The correct quote is “Hell is other people,” not “Hell is other people at breakfast.”

The New York Times International Weekly corrects a mangled Sartre quote
The New York Times International Weekly corrects a mangled Sartre quote.

Though not available online, I received a photo of the print version of the correction from Taiwan-based journalist Dan Bloom. (The original, incorrect item is placed to the left of the correction.)

Bloom is the eagle-eyed reader who spotted the Sartre misquote last week and requested a correction. (Poynter’s Andrew Beaujon previously wrote about this quote, which has taken on a life of its own.)

Bloom has since written several articles and blog posts about how this misquote made it into circulation. Here’s him writing for The Wrap:

This is how things work in the Internet Age.

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LA Times corrects misquote, context, attribution:

Parenting: In a column in the Feb. 28 Section A about the challenge parents face in letting go when children leave home, Jill Fields was misquoted as saying, in reference to a summer she spent as a teenager in the 1970s visiting Watts, “The most exciting time was one night when somebody had a gun.” What she said was that there was “excitement one night when somebody had a gun.” Fields did not see a gun and did not personally consider the news exciting. The column also refers to a classmate making anti-Semitic remarks. The remarks were not made by a classmate, but by someone her class encountered during a field trip.

Los Angeles Times

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The New York Times corrects some repetition, repetition:

An article on Monday about guilty verdicts in a murder trial in Canada involving a family of Afghan immigrants quoted incorrectly from a comment by the trial judge, Justice Robert L. Maranger. The judge said, ”It is difficult to conceive of a more despicable, more heinous, more honorless crime.” He did not say ”more despicable, more heinous, more despicable, more honorless crime.”

The New York Times

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Correction: A previous version of this alert incorrectly stated that Gingrich had asked for a divorce on Marianne Gingrich’s birthday. Marianne told The Washington Post it was on her mother’s birthday.

A correction in The Washington Post (via Politico and Daniel)

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Talking about performing in the musical “The Who’s Tommy,” the actor and singer Michael Cerveris said, “I couldn’t sing it all when I got the job.” An article on Mr. Cerveris in the latest Friday Journal incorrectly quoted him as saying, “I couldn’t sing at all when I got the job.”

A correction in The Wall Street Journal

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