Articles about "MSNBC"


Rainbow Room Reopening

N.Y. publishers mull more layoffs

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. More layoffs may come at New York publishers: “Industry executives are spending the month of October in closed-door meetings as they look for ways to tighten their belts even more.” (WWD) | Related: Time Inc. management “wants the ability to send 160 editorial jobs overseas,” Newspaper Guild of New York President Bill O’Meara says. (Capital) | Meta related: New owner Jay Penske‘s plan for WWD. (Capital) | Related sad trombone: “The joy we get from throwing magazines away seems like a bad sign for their future,” Laura Hazard Owen writes. (Gigaom)
  2. NBC News crew quarantined: They worked with freelance cameraman Ashoka Mukpo in Liberia and “Officials said the order was issued late Friday after the crew members violated an agreement to voluntarily confine themselves.” No one’s shown any signs of the disease. (Reuters) | “With the Ebola virus, you never relax completely, but we think [Mukpo] has made great progress,” a doctor at the Omaha hospital where he’s being treated said. (Mashable)
  3. Keith Olbermann notifies his bosses about his commentaries: Olbermann gives ESPN execs in Bristol “as much as six hours notice,” he tells Richard Deitsch. “The key people all get the A Block [opening] commentary and the Worst Persons. So the scripts are sitting with them for a couple of hours.” (SI)
  4. NYT kills chess column: Dylan Loeb McClain‘s Oct. 11 column ends with an abrupt note: “This is the final chess column to run in The New York Times.” (NYT) | “Few will mourn, even as a symbolic loss.” (@Kasparov63) | “A chess column has appeared in the NYT since… 1855.” (@DVNJr) | The bridge column is still breathing, Michael Roston notes. (@michaelroston)
  5. Why David Remnick isn’t on Twitter: “I don’t have a Twitter account, [but] not because I’m a dinosaur about it,” the New Yorker EIC tells Alexandra Steigrad. “I have enough of a platform here. People in my position who do it tend to use it in a promotional way or in a hamstrung way. I look at Twitter all the time as a news tool or for cultural conversation. I’ve used it in my reporting. It’s very useful.” (WWD)
  6. Peter Parker’s poor journalism ethics: “That’s exactly how Peter Parker paid the bills in the early Spider-Man comics, taking posed pictures of Spider-Man that no one else could get, then selling them to J. Jonah Jameson, the Daily Bugle’s editor-in-chief.” (Salon) | Related: 5 bad journalism lessons from Superman comics (Poynter)
  7. “The network just doesn’t surprise you”: Bill Carter looks at why MSNBC’s ratings “hit one of the deepest skids in its history, with the recently completed third quarter of 2014 generating some record lows.” (NYT)
  8. YouTube builds a “teaching hospital”: At its new production space in Manhattan, members of the company’s partner program “are given access to better cameras, production spaces and editing facilities as classes train them not just in shooting video, but also in makeup, design and anything else that might make programming pop online.” (NYT)
  9. Front page of the day, curated by Kristen Hare: Chicago’s RedEye fronts a very nicely framed image from this weekend’s St. Louis protests. (Courtesy the Newseum.)

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  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: David Cohn is now executive producer at AJ+. Previously, he was chief content officer at Circa. (Dave Cohn) | Lenika Cruz has been named associate editor at The Atlantic. Previously, she was a contributing editor at Circa. Grace White will be a reporter at CBS Houston. Previously, she was a reporter and anchor at Fox 29 San Antonio. (Muck Rack) | Rick Daniels has been named publisher at The Hartford (Connecticut) Courant. Previously, he was chief operating officer of GoLocal24. Nancy Meyer has been named publisher and CEO of Orlando Sentinel Media Group. Previously, she was publisher of the Courant. (Poynter) | Dana Hahn has been named news director for KTVU in San Francisco. Previously, she was news director for WTTG in Washington, D.C. Sara Suarez has been named news director for WFDC in Washington, D.C. Previously, she was news director for WUNI in Boston. Matt King has been named news director for WCNC in Charlotte, North Carolina. Previously, he was assistant news director at WXIA in Atlanta. Jeff Mulligan has been named news director for WMBD/WYZZ in Peoria, Illinois. Previously, he was assistant news director for WISH in Indianapolis. Lee Rosenthal has been named news director at WFXT in Boston. Previously, he was news director at KTVU. Rick Moll has been named news director at WSLS in Roanoke, Virginia. Previously, he was news director for WMBD/WYZZ in Peoria, Illinois. Brian Nemitz has been named assistant news director at WLOS in Asheville, North Carolina. Previously, he was a nightside executive producer at WTVJ in Miami. Martha Jennings has been named assistant news director at WBIR in Knoxville, Tennessee. Previously, she was nightside executive producer at WFLA in Tampa, Florida. Troy Conhain has been named nightside executive producer at KOLD in Tucson, Arizona. Previously, he was morning executive producer at KPHO in Phoenix, Arizona. (Rick Gevers) | Job of the day The Hill is looking for a campaign reporter. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would like me to send you this roundup each morning? Please email me: abeaujon@poynter.org.

Programming note: I’m going to be off for most of this week and will be at the Creative Belfast conference on Thursday. Sam Kirkland will leave a roundup under your pillow while I’m gone. Read more

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MSNBC hosts Rachel Maddow, left, Lawrence O'Donnell, center, and Chris Matthews take part in a panel discussion at the NBC Universal summer press tour, Tuesday, Aug. 2, 2011, in Beverly Hills, Calif. (AP Photo/Chris Pizzello)

MSNBC apologizes for Cinco de Mayo segment

MSNBC | Hugo Balta | NAHJ | BuzzFeed | Huffington Post | Politico | Maynard Institute

In a statement on its website, MSNBC’s “Way Too Early” says the show on Monday “made sarcastic references to the way some Americans celebrate” Cinco de Mayo. “It was not our intention to be disrespectful and we sincerely apologize for the ill-advised references,” the statement says.

The National Association for Hispanic Journalists demanded MSNBC apologize for the video, which featured producer Louis Burgdorf in a sombrero guzzling tequila and shaking a maraca. The segment “clearly proves that diversity is lacking at the Way Too Early program,” NAHJ said. Read more

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MSNBC fires staffer after Cheerios tweet goes bad

Politico

Phil Griffin, MSNBC president, said the network fired a staffer who issued a tweet suggesting that conservatives hate interracial marriages, Politico’s Dylan Byers reported Thursday.

“The tweet last night was outrageous and unacceptable. We immediately acknowledged that it was offensive and wrong, apologized, and deleted it. We have dismissed the person responsible for the tweet,” Griffin stated and Politico reported.

Byers wrote the Republican National Committee’s communications director told its staff in a memo that the commitee’s chairman, Reince Priebus, had accepted the apology. Priebus had promised a boycott of MSNBC appearances by RNC officials if the apology was not forthcoming.
The offending tweet went out Wednesday night:
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Pew study finds big differences in recent network coverage

Pew Research Center

Four cable news networks devoted significantly different amounts of time to Obamacare and the typhoon in the Philippines, according to a new study from Pew Research Center. On Wednesday, Mark Jurkowitz, Paul Hitlin, Nancy Vogt and Monica Anderson reported that a pattern emerged after analyzing 80 hours of cable news from Nov. 11 through Nov. 15.

The two channels with strong ideological identities in prime-time—liberal MSBNC and conservative Fox News—spent far more time on the politically-charged health insurance story than the overseas disaster. And the two organizations that built a brand on global reporting—CNN and Al Jazeera America, an offshoot of the Qatar-based Al Jazeera media network—spent considerably more time on the tragedy in the Philippines.

MSNBC, they report, devoted four times more coverage to issues with the healthcare law. Fox covered healthcare 80 times more than the typhoon. Read more

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Stein en route on Monday (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Why SCOTUSblog’s intern was running toward MSNBC

Dan Stein’s monster hustle getting opinions from the Supreme Court pressroom to TV crews this week has become the toast of the Internet:

BuzzFeed’s Benny Johnson saluted Stein’s “masterful technique” and wrote that his “fluttering tie truly makes this a special moment.” Slate led its story about the Supreme Court’s decision on the Voting Rights Act Tuesday with a picture of Stein’s black dress shoes hovering over the court steps, his face exuding determination. Read more

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MSNBC’s Griffin: ‘We’re not the place’ for breaking news

The New York Times | MediaBistro | The Nation

MSNBC president Phil Griffin doesn’t seem much concerned about his network’s latest ratings slide from second to fourth place behind Fox News, CNN and HLN, despite heavy cable network viewership during recent major news events. His explanation: MSNBC doesn’t do breaking news anymore.

“We’re not the place for that,” he tells the New York Times’ Bill Carter. “Our brand is not that.” Griffin, who already has said “this whole concept of journalist has to be rethought,” said an 18 percent loss in viewership in the second quarter so far this year (including sharper drops for shows hosted by Chris Hayes and Rachel Maddow) is a bump on the road as MSNBC continues to shift its focus on being outspokenly left-wing to counter Fox News’ conservative stance.

“You do have to look at the long term,” Mr. Griffin said in May. “In the first quarter of this year, Fox News had its lowest quarter in a decade. A year ago CNN had its worst month ever. I tip my hat to what CNN has done this month, but let’s not be so myopic as to think the whole world has changed.”

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RolandMartin

When anchor jobs open up in cable news, people of color too often left out

Despite his history as an aggressive and sometimes fiery advocate, outgoing CNN analyst Roland Martin is surprisingly reserved when discussing the cable newschannel’s decision not to renew his contract after six years as a high-profile analyst, often speaking on black issues.

“I get this; I’ve run three newspapers,” said Martin, who once guest-hosted the 8 p.m. timeslot on CNN years ago, with an eye toward earning a full-time anchor job. “I know what it means to have your own vision … I now have the freedom to explore and do more things, especially in the digital space.”

Martin, who has been one of CNN’s highest-profile African American analysts, said he learned in December that the newschannel likely wouldn’t renew his contract — a decision that was confirmed in a later meeting with newly-hired CNN Worldwide President Jeff Zucker, who has talked with the National Association of Black Journalists about diversity at the network.

Martin told his Twitter followers on Tuesday that his last day would be April 6. That will come about a week after the departure of Soledad O’Brien, CNN’s highest-profile anchor of color, has said her last day hosting the newschannel’s morning show “Starting Point” is March 29.

(O’Brien had previously announced plans to develop longform documentaries for CNN through her own production company, softening the news that she was leaving the morning program.)

The optics, as some might say, are not great. Just as Zucker steps forward with a new vision for CNN — which includes a new show featuring former ABC correspondent Jake Tapper and a new morning program built around former ABC anchor Chris Cuomo — two of the channel’s best known non-white on-air staffers are leaving the network.

And it’s not just at CNN. MSNBC has had its own set of anchor changes in recent weeks, so far centered only on white male anchors. And Fox News Channel, which hasn’t substantively changed its primetime lineup in many years, features no people of color as anchors in those timeslots.

Which raises the question: When big anchor jobs open up in cable news, why are people of color so often left on the sidelines?

CNN also announced Monday the hiring of three correspondents, two of whom are non-white, George Howell and Alina Machado. But Tapper notwithstanding, in today’s cable news world, correspondents often don’t make it to the anchor chair, and CNN has been criticized in the past for failing to slot anchors of color into high-profile weekday jobs.

MSNBC offers the most diverse anchor lineup among the big three cable newschannels. But its recent moves so far have focused on white males, moving Ed Schultz from his 8 p.m. weekday slot to weekend evenings, handing weekend host Chris Hayes the task of competing against CNN’ Anderson Cooper and Fox News Channel’s Bill O’Reilly, beginning April 1.

Steve Kornacki of MSNBC’s afternoon show “The Cycle” will take Hayes’ job hosting “Up” weekend mornings. Some fans still pine to see ace analyst Ezra Klein given a shot to join the newschannel’s anchor lineup.

More than anything, the lack of diversity in some anchor shuffles may speak to a lack of development for anchors of color in general. Maintaining diversity in the face of shrinking resources and cost-cutting often requires specific effort; if people aren’t being groomed for bigger jobs, they may not be ready when those prime positions open up.

Fielding a diverse slate of anchors at the highest levels can ultimately help diversify content, and it reflects America’s increasing diversity. Opportunities remain for developing talent. Despite rumors that Erin Burnett may be paired with Cuomo, the official shape of CNN’s new morning show hasn’t yet been revealed, and Kornacki’s departure may leave an opening at “The Cycle.”

For his part, Martin says he expects to develop new opportunities on his own, including two book projects. He will continue to host “Washington Watch,” his Sunday politics show at black-focused cable channel TV One, along with his syndicated column and appearances on the nationally syndicated radio program the “Tom Joyner Morning Show.”

Martin remains convinced that mainstream media outlets can profit by offering anchor lineups that feature more diversity.

“African Americans are very loyal customers, and during coverage of the presidential elections (in 2008), we had tremendous African American support (at CNN)” he said. “Every broadcaster needs to pay attention to that now.” Read more

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In final week of election, MSNBC aired no positive Romney stories

Pew
During the last week of the 2012 presidential campaign, Fox News and MSNBC both took a dramatically negative tone toward President Obama and Mitt Romney, respectively.

68 percent of MSNBC’s coverage of Romney was negative during from Oct. 29-Nov. 5, up from 57 percent in October. That doesn’t sound too surprising, except that Pew found 5 percent of MSNBC’s Romney coverage was positive from Oct. 1-28, while it found no positive coverage of Romney when it looked at the final week’s stories. It also found no negative coverage of Obama.

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Trymaine Lee: New MSNBC gig is a chance to ‘flex different muscles’

Maynard Institute
Trymaine Lee, the Huffington Post reporter who helped move the Trayvon Martin story into the mainstream, is taking a job at MSNBC.

Reached by phone, Lee told Poynter he was taking most of November off to spend time with his daughter, who was born in August. His exact role at MSNBC “will be tightened” after he gets there, he said, but he expects to focus on what he said were “issues that are important to progressives,” such as gun rights and gun control.

As a police reporter at the New Orleans Times-Picayune, Lee was part of a team that won a Pulitzer Prize for its Hurricane Katrina coverage. He also contributed reporting to The New York Times’ Pultizer Prize-winning coverage of Gov. Eliot Spitzer’s downfall, Richard Prince writes. Read more

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NBC, MSNBC 9/11 anniversary broadcasts stir emotions and controversy

Today is, of course, the 11th anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. It was the biggest news event of a generation, but particularly iconic for television news.

MSNBC re-airs the original Today Show coverage of 9/11.
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