Articles about "Naming Errors"


A New York Times story badly mangled the subject of Morgan Spurlock’s new film, as well as the title of a TV production company:

An article last Sunday about the documentary maker Morgan Spurlock, who has a new film out on the boy band One Direction, misstated the subject of his 2012 movie “Mansome.” It is about male grooming, not Charles Manson. The article also misspelled the name of the production company of Simon Cowell, on whose “X Factor” talent competition show One Direction was created. The company is Syco, not Psycho.

New York Times

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The New York Times misidentified the man Sen. John McCain called an “agent of intolerance”:

Because of an editing error, an article last Sunday about Mitt Romney’s commencement speech at Liberty University misstated, in some editions, the year of his last presidential run. It was 2008, not 2004. Also because of an editing error, the article misstated, in some editions, the surname of the evangelical leader whom Senator John McCain called an ”agent of intolerance.” It is Pat Robertson, not Pat Roberts.

The New York Times

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A collection of Slate name corrections from last week:

In an April 26 “Culturebox” piece, Jenny Hendrix misspelled Edgar Allan Poe’s middle name.

The guide to the April 25 “Culture Gabfest” misspelled Kanye West’s first name.

In the April 25 “Politics,” John Dickerson misspelled H.L. Mencken’s name.

In the April 25 “Reckoning” blog post, Michael Moran misidentified U.K. chancellor George Osborne as David Osborne.

In the April 24 “Politics,” John Dickerson referred to Sarah Palin wowing conservatives in Denver. Her speech, to the Republican National Convention in 2008, was in St. Paul, Minn. Additionally, because of an editor error, Sen. Ron Johnson was misidentified as Tim Johnson.

Related: Why journalists get names wrong and how to get them right

Slate

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Slate referred to an author winning the “Huge Award,” resulting in this correction:

In a March 2 “Future Tense” blog post, Torie Bosch misspelled the science fiction award won by writer Bruce Sterling. It is of course the Hugo Award, not the Huge Award.

Slate

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The New York Times flubs a famous film title in a TV column about the Oscars:

The TV Watch column in some editions on Monday, about the telecast of the Academy Awards ceremony, where Octavia Spencer won the Oscar for best supporting actress for her performance in ”The Help,” misstated part of the title of a 1967 film to which ”The Help” was compared. It is ”Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner,” not ”Guess Whose Coming to Dinner.”

New York Times

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The Wall Street Journal misspelled the name of its own reporter:

The first name of reporter Damian Paletta was misspelled in some editions as Damien in the byline of an Election 2012 article Thursday about President Obama’s corporate-tax overhaul proposal.

Thanks to Alicia Shepard for the tip.

Wall Street Journal

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The New York Times Magazine mistakenly referred to the “Nuclear Proliferation Treaty”

An article on Page 22 this weekend about Israel’s response to the possibility of Iran’s acquiring a nuclear weapon misstates part of the name of a treaty that the International Atomic Energy Agency claimed Iran was in breach of. It is the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (not Proliferation).

A correction in The New York Times Magazine

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An obituary on Wednesday about the harpsichordist, organist and conductor Gustav Leonhardt misspelled several names. One of the musicians who, like Mr. Leonhardt, made influential recordings on period instruments in the 1950s and 1960s was August Wenzinger, not Wenziger. The man with whom he studied organ and harpsichord at the Schola Cantorum in Basel, Switzerland, was Eduard Muller, not Miiller. And one of the churches in Amsterdam where Mr. Leonhardt has been organist is Waalse Kerk, not Waasle Kerk.

A correction in The New York Times

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An article last Tuesday about opposition by the West 69th Street Block Association to the renaming of a portion of that street after a mayoral aide misspelled the middle name of a famous writer who had part of West 84th Street named after him in 1980. He was Edgar Allan Poe, not Allen. (The same misspelling appeared on the street sign erected by the city to honor Poe, a former resident of West 84th. Though the city spelled his name correctly on its second try, the same cannot be said of The Times, which has corrected Poe’s middle name at least 10 times — though dozens of misspellings of Allan, dating to the 1870s, were never corrected.)

A correction in The New York Times

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Coca-Cola Co. was misspelled as Cola-Cola Co. in the first reference of a Marketplace article on orange juice on Thursday.

A correction in The Wall Street Journal

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