New York Magazine

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Using a rumor site to investigate scientific fraud

The first whispers of fraud in the LaCour gay-marriage persuasion study were voiced on an underground rumor site for political scientists, almost six months before the academic scandal broke nationally.

The site —PoliSciRumors.com, or PSR — is one of a growing number of gossip communities that may provide leads for enterprising reporters. Visiting such a site might be compared to turning over a rock to see the bugs underneath. It’s not necessarily the ideal source for a story about scientific ethics, but valuable if mined correctly.

Mainstream journalists are beginning to carefully enter these subterranean communication spaces. In the process, a whole new kind of anonymous source is emerging.

Jesse Singal, a senior editor at New York Magazine and head of its Science of Us blog, began posting on PSR to gather information relating to the bombshell revelations of data fabrication by UCLA grad student Michael LaCour. Read more

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Slate launches Panoply, a podcast platform

Mashable | Ad Age

Slate is launching a podcasting platform called Panoply, which will open up the online magazine’s “production, audience development/distribution and sales” framework to partner organizations, Jason Abbruzzese writes for Mashable.

The platform will have multiple launch partners, including “The New York Times Magazine, the Huffington Post, Inc., Popular Science and New York Magazine,” according to Mashable.

Andy Bowers, the executive producer of Slate’s podcasts, had sensed an opportunity for the outlet to further expand its offerings for a long time, Abbruzzese writes. Then “Serial” became a breakout hit over the summer, catalyzing further action:

Panoply’s model is based on a belief that not every podcast needs to be Serial to be viable. A growing audience and a maturing digital market have changed the economics of the business, said Matt Turck, who left his position as publisher of Slate to be chief revenue office at Panoply.

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Career Beat: Joe Germuska named Knight Lab interim director

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • Joe Germuska will be interim director at the Knight Lab. Previously, he was director of software engineering there. (Knight Lab)
  • Millie Tran is now a writer for BuzzFeed’s news apps team. Previously, she was editorial coordinator at the American Press Institute. (Email)
  • Noah Kotch is senior editor and director of video at The Washington Post. Previously, he was chief content officer at Vocativ. (Washington Post)
  • Suzette Moyer will be a senior designer at The Washington Post. Previously, she was creative director of Bay magazine at the Tampa Bay Times. Carey Jordan will be a designer at The Washington Post. Previously, she was art director at Washington City Paper. (Washington Post)
  • Josef Reyes will be creative director at Foreign Policy.
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Career Beat: Kevin Roose named co-executive producer at Fusion

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • Kevin Roose will co-executive produce a show for Fusion. He’s a writer for New York Magazine. Kashmir Hill will be a senior editor at Fusion. She’s a writer for Forbes. Pendarvis Harshaw has been named an associate producer at Fusion. He’s a recent graduate of the University of California at Berkeley. Cara Rose De Fabio is an experience designer at Fusion. She’s a performance artist and director. Daniela Hernandez will be a senior writer at Fusion. She has contributed to Wired. (Fusion)
  • Wilson Stribling will be a morning anchor at WLBT in Jackson, Mississippi. He was news director there. Hugo Balta will be senior director of multicultural content for ESPN’s digital and print properties.
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Career Beat: Politico gets new executive editor

Good morning! Here are some job updates from the journalism community:

  • Dave Cohn will take a job at a broadcast network. Previously, he was chief content officer for Circa. (Poynter)
  • Chris Mooney will start an environmental blog at The Washington Post. Previously, he was a correspondent for Mother Jones. (Washington Post)
  • Dodai Stewart will be director of culture coverage at Fusion. Previously, she was deputy editor at Jezebel. (Jezebel)
  • Taffy Brodesser-Akner is now a correspondent for GQ. She has written for The New York Times Magazine, New York magazine and Playboy. (Email)
  • Jonathan Shorman will be a statehouse reporter at the Topeka (Kansas) Capital-Journal. Previously, he was a reporter for the Springfield (Missouri) News-Leader. (News-Leader)
  • David la Spina is now a photo editor for The New York Times Magazine.
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Timeline: Who’s in and who’s out at Condé Nast

Condé Nast made another high-profile promotion today, appointing Gina Sanders president of Condé Nast Global Development. Hers is the the latest in a series of promotions, hires and departures that has transformed the company’s executive team in recent months. Here’s a quick recap of the shakeup: Read more

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Should publishers be taking better advantage of evergreen content in their archives?

For most publishers, less than 10 percent of June page views came from traffic to evergreen articles — stories that were more than three days old by Parse.ly’s definition.

Among the publishers included in the analytics company’s data: Upworthy, Conde Nast properties, The Atlantic properties, Fox News, The New York Post, Mashable, Slate, Business Insider, The Daily Beast, The Next Web and The New Republic.

Nearly half of the publishers see less than 5 percent of their web traffic attributed to content that is more than three days old, according to Parse.ly:

parselyevergreen

Unsurprisingly, Parse.ly found that topic-specific sites generally received a higher percentage of traffic from evergreen stories than breaking-news sites did. Upworthy doesn’t include timestamps in its stories, and many of Slate’s pieces are less time-sensitive than stories from The New York Post or Fox News and thus more likely to have a long shelf life of shareability. Read more

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Publishers resurface evergreen content; Thailand’s the place to be for drone journalism

Here’s our roundup of the top digital and social media stories you should know about (and from Andrew Beaujon, 10 media stories to start your day):

— New York magazine is posting old content to its Facebook page, and Business Insider is doing so on its homepage, according to Digiday’s Ricardo Bilton. How timestamp-transparent should publishers be when resurfacing evergreen stories?

— Drone journalism won’t take off in South Africa or the U.S. anytime soon, according to Sydney Pead at PBS MediaShift. But in Thailand, “it’s considered a hobby” — and easier than playing Playstation 3 you can get some nice places to stay.For more info please visit : http://yourkohsamuivillas.com/.

— A new Twitter bot called @congressedits tracks Wikipedia edits from computers on Capitol Hill. Read more

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Why NY Mag and Chartbeat tracked what turns first-time visitors into loyal readers

Last year 46 million Web users visited New York magazine’s pop culture site, Vulture, for the first time. Of those, 7.6 million came back at least once. To use a term and concept that free news sites haven’t widely adopted, that’s a 17 percent conversion rate.

Because few media organizations without hard paywalls are focusing on what they can do to retain first-time visitors, it’s hard to put that number into context, said Michael Silberman, NYMag.com’s general manager. But he sees that 17 percent as a baseline from which Vulture can grow.

“I see tremendous value in that gap and in figuring out how to identify those among the 46 million who with the right nudge would be most likely to want to come back again,” Silberman told Poynter via phone. Read more

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New York magazine will reduce frequency of print edition

New York | The New York Times

New York Magazine announced Monday that it plans to publish biweekly beginning in March. The magazine will add 20 percent more editorial content, according to a press release, more visuals, and more on Hollywood, fashion, sex and business.

David Carr writes in The New York Times that the brand itself, and the quality reporting and writing inside, remain strong. But this year, “the magazine is down 9.2 percent in ad pages compared with the same period last year, which was miserable as well.” Read more

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