Articles about "The New York Times"


Guardian: NYT makes ‘big move’ into London

The Guardian

The New York Times will move “up to 100″ staff to a new digital center in London, The Guardian’s Roy Greenslade reported Friday.

Greenslade writes that the new outpost, which will be based in the Bloomsbury borough of England’s capital city, will “become the newspaper’s European digital hub and centre for the paper’s international issues.”

There is no question of the Paris office itself – home for so long to the iconic International Herald Tribune – being closed. It is simply believed that London is a more appropriate place from which to cover the European continent.

According to a Property Week article, the paper’s owners have signed a deal for the entire 9,000 sq ft building at close to the asking rental fee of £50 a sq ft.

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Career Beat: Joel Lovell joins ‘This American Life,’ The Atavist

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community.

  • Joel Lovell will join “This American Life” and The Atavist. He was editing special projects for The New York Times. (Huffington Post)
  • Hernán Rozemberg will be editor-in-chief of the San Antonio Current. He is metro editor for the Lafayette Journal and Courier. (Media Moves)
  • Mike Wilson will be editor of The Dallas Morning News. He’s the managing editor of FiveThirtyEight. (Poynter)
  • Byron Pitts has been named co-anchor of “Nightline.” Pitts is chief national correspondent at ABC News. (Huffington Post)
  • Ben Pershing will be editor at National Journal Daily. He’s the Washington editor at National Journal. Tim Alberta is now a senior political correspondent at National Journal. Previously, he was senior editor of National Journal Hotline. Shane Goldmacher is a senior political correspondent for National Journal. Previously, he was a congressional correspondent there.
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Goodbye, Stephen Colbert, love, NYT

The New York Times

“I think it’s gonna leave a hole in my night,” The New York Times’ David Carr says in this farewell video the Times published Thursday. “I really liked getting tucked in by Stephen Colbert.”

In the video, the Times’ Bill Carter, Nicholas Confessore, William Rhoden, Mark Leibovich, and Carr all talk about Colbert’s show.

More goodbyes:

Mashable has a walking goodbye with Google Map Street View studio tour.

Vulture has lots of famous people saying goodbye.

And Time has four enemies of Colbert’s saying goodbye, including Suey Park. Read more

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‘Tomato Can Blues’ author says her job will ‘cease to exist’ at NYT

Mary Pilon, the award-winning New York Times sports reporter who wrote “Tomato Can Blues,” tweeted Wednesday her job at the paper “is among those that will cease to exist.”

Pilon told Poynter it was “a privilege and an honor to work at The New York Times” in an email.

“The people make the place and I feel incredibly humbled to have counted myself as a member of the newsroom,” Pilon said. “I’m proud of the work I did there and send nothing but best wishes going forward.”

In addition to writing the illustrated longread for The Times, Pilon is also the author of “The Monopolists,” a forthcoming book about the history of the game Monopoly, according to her website. Read more

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Career Beat: Newsday makes 2 executive appointments

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community.

  • Paul Likins is now vice president of digital operations at Newsday Media Group. Previously, he was head of revenue operations and programmatic solutions for Wenner Media. Stefanie Angeli is now senior director of national sales at Newsday Media Group. She previously led sales at Mom365.com. (Email)
  • Gregg Birnbaum is now managing editor, head of political content at New York Daily News. He is a deputy managing editor at Politico. (Email)
  • Matt Cooper is now politics editor at Newsweek. He has covered the White House for Time, The New Republic and U.S. News and World Report. Ross Schneiderman is now a senior editor at Newsweek. He has contributed to The Wall Street Journal and The New York Times. Jonathan Broder is now a senior writer at Newsweek. Previously, he was the defense and foreign policy editor at Congressional Quarterly. Winston Ross is now a national correspondent for Newsweek.
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The ethics of hacked email and otherwise ill-gotten information

Sony and Aaron Sorkin both got it wrong. There are journalism ethics to mining emails hacked by someone else. But the question is not whether or not to mine them, but rather how.

Journalists generally agree that it’s appropriate to use ill-gotten information in the public interest, whether it’s the Pentagon Papers or a massive email hack.

But good intentions and execution are two different things. The latter involves a solid process rooted in journalistic values — because public interest is a moving target. Some newsrooms claim public interest when information is merely interesting, funny or salacious. The article about Channing Tatum’s goofy email might fall into that category.

BuzzFeed’s look at Maureen Dowd’s practice of allowing prior review, which Dowd denied, could be in the public interest because Dowd is a powerful columnist at a powerful newspaper that influences public opinion. If she shows special favor to certain people, it would be in the public interest to know that. Read more

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NYT: ‘We could do a lot better’ on linking

The New York Times

New York Times standards editor Phillip Corbett wrote Tuesday that the newsroom should do a better job of providing links in its articles:

For all our progress in digital journalism, we sometimes still neglect one of its most basic tools: the link.

Online readers today simply expect links and find their absence baffling or worse. Links provide background information, buttress our reporting, point to related material, aid search and help ensure proper credit and attribution. They are easy to include and cost nothing.

They should be as routine in our stories as quotes, and for many reporters they are. But we still miss many opportunities.

Corbett then cited New York Times news presentation editor Patrick LaForge, who pointed to several articles that called for links, including a story about the oil boom in North Dakota, and a recent article about Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s response to the blizzard that hit Buffalo. Read more

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NYT corrects: Pope didn’t open heaven to pets

A New York Times story by Rick Gladstone carries a hefty correction explaining that pooches are still barred from everlasting paradise:

An earlier version of this article misstated the circumstances of Pope Francis’ remarks. He made them in a general audience at the Vatican, not in consoling a distraught boy whose dog had died. The article also misstated what Francis is known to have said. According to Vatican Radio, Francis said: “The Holy Scripture teaches us that the fulfillment of this wonderful design also affects everything around us,” which was interpreted to mean he believes animals go to heaven. Francis is not known to have said: “One day, we will see our animals again in the eternity of Christ. Paradise is open to all of God’s creatures.’’ (Those remarks were once made by Pope Paul VI to a distraught child, and were cited in a Corriere della Sera article that concluded Francis believes animals go to heaven.) An earlier version also referred incompletely to the largest animal protection group in the United States.

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Facing a flood of incivility, news sites make reader comments harder to find

When the Los Angeles Times redesigned its website earlier this year, it became harder to find the opinions of people like iamstun1, jumped2, and Shootist.

Those are the screen names of some Times readers who are among the most prolific authors of online comments. Their writings, like the rest of the reader comments, no longer appear at the bottom of stories on latimes.com.

Instead, comments for each article remain hidden unless users click on an icon along the right side of the screen.

Screenshot from latimes.com

Screenshot from latimes.com

That opens a separate page where readers can peruse the thoughts of iamstun1 on the federal budget bill (“Republicans really are scums”), jumped2 on the Senate torture investigation (“EVERYONE involved in releasing the CIA report and harming our Military should be tried for TREASON and HUNG”), and Shootist on a flash flood that damaged homes and forced evacuations throughout Southern California (“couldn’t happen to a more deserving bunch of pantywaists”). Read more

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Hollywood to journalism: Delete, delete, delete

Good morning. My name is Kristen Hare and I’ll be driving this thing for awhile. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Hollywood is concerned about the ethics and morals of journalism

    Sony's lawyer sent a letter to news organizations demanding that the documents stolen from the company in the recent hack be "avoided, and destroyed." (The New York Times) | Aaron Sorkin totally agrees. (The New York Times.) | Dan Kennedy does not. "Dear Sony: Stealing information is a crime. Receiving stolen information and publishing it is protected by the First Amendment." (@dankennedy_nu) | RELATED: Here's a pretty good explainer if you're not sure how we got to the place where the creator of a show about a fictional newsroom is doling out advice to real ones. (Fusion)

  2. The Sydney siege continues

    Chris Kenny, associate editor of The Australian, left the Lindt cafe with a coffee just before the gunman took over.

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