Articles about "The New York Times"


NYT corrects: Bald eagles’ poop isn’t purple

A New York Times correction delves into the nitty gritty of bald eagle and osprey poop:

An earlier version of this article described bald eagles and ospreys incorrectly. They eat fish, and their poop is white; they do not eat berries and excrete purple feces. (Other birds, like American robins, Eurasian starlings and cedar waxwings, do.)

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AP journalist and translator killed in Gaza

Simone Camilli in Beit Lahiya on Monday. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. AP journalist and translator killed, photographer injured in Gaza: Simone Camilli and translator Ali Shehda Abu Afash “died Wednesday when Gaza police engineers were neutralizing unexploded ordnance in the Gaza town of Beit Lahiya left over from fighting between Israel and Islamic militants.” AP photographer Hatem Moussa was seriously injured in the explosion. (AP) | Moussa got AP’s “Beat of the Week” nod last month. (APME)
  2. Is there a second Snowden? James Bamford writes that he got “unrestricted access to [Edward Snowden's] cache of documents in various locations. And going through this archive using a sophisticated digital search tool, I could not find some of the documents that have made their way into public view, leading me to conclude that there must be a second leaker somewhere.” (Wired) | Related: What it’s like to do a photoshoot with Snowden.
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Journalists injured in helicopter crash in Iraq

The New York Times | Time

The New York Times’ Alissa Rubin was injured in a helicopter crash in Iraq that killed the pilot, Rod Nordland reported for the Times on Tuesday. Freelance photojournalist Adam Ferguson was also in the helicopter and not injured, Nordland reported.

The helicopter, which had delivered emergency aid and picked up some Yazidi evacuees, crashed shortly after it took off, survivors said.

Nordland reported that Rubin, the Times’ Paris bureau chief, “suffered an apparent concussion and broken wrists but was conscious, she confirmed when contacted briefly by cellphone.” Nordland reported that the cause of the crash was unclear.

Dan Kedmey reported for Time that photographer Moises Saman, who was on assignment for Time, was also in the crash.

Saman said he had been pinned down by the weight of some of the passengers for a while but was unhurt other than suffering a minor cut on his head.

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Career Beat: Maureen Dowd is a staff writer at NYT Magazine

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • Drew Schutte is now publisher of Details. Formerly, he was executive vice president and chief integration officer at Condé Nast. (Condé Nast)
  • Maureen Dowd is now a staff writer at The New York Times Magazine. She will keep her Sunday column for the Times. (New York Times)
  • Austin Beutner is now publisher and CEO of the Los Angeles Times. Formerly, he was rumored to be interested in buying the newspaper. (Poynter)
  • Claudia Milne is head of live TV at Bloomberg. Formerly, she was the deputy editor of World News America for the BBC. (@claudmilne)
  • Michael Shamberg and Jordan Peele will advise BuzzFeed Motion Pictures. Shamberg was executive producer for Django Unchained.
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Why AP style doesn’t use ISIL or ISIS anymore

Just two weeks after the Associated Press explained why it referred to the Islamic militant group laying siege to Iraq as “ISIL” rather than “ISIS,” the rebels complicated matters by declaring a new “Islamic caliphate” and changing their name to “the Islamic State.”

The English translation for the group’s former name previously used by the AP was the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, or ISIL. News organizations like The New York Times and The Los Angeles Times, meanwhile, referred to it as the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, or ISIS.

Now the question for news organizations is whether to go along with the group’s rebranding efforts and potentially grant it undeserved legitimacy, or to keep using an acronym that’s familiar to readers but is arguably out-of-date.… Read more

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Yet another NYT digital tier?

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Another NYT subscription tier? Lucia Moses reports: “According to a survey sent to readers this week, the new offering would give users 30 articles a month for $8, over 45 percent lower than the current cheapest offering.” (Digiday) | The Times has also floated the prospect of a shorter print edition in a survey, Joe Pompeo reported last week. (Capital) | The launch of its most recent digital products “has been anything but smooth.” (Poynter) | Sam Kirkland shows you how to save money on your NYT sub. (Poynter)
  2. Edward Snowden to stay longer in Russia: He got a three-year residence permit, his lawyer says. He’ll be able to travel abroad.
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Keller: NYT’s drug-testing ‘is increasingly difficult to defend’

Reddit | Facebook | Gawker | The Huffington Post

During a question-and-answer session on Reddit today, former New York Times executive editor Bill Keller said the paper’s policy for drug testing its employees for marijuana is “increasingly difficult to defend” in light of the editorial board’s pro-pot stance.

Keller was taking questions to promote The Marshall Project, a nonprofit startup dedicated to covering the U.S. criminal justice system.

When a commenter asked Keller what he thought of the paper’s drug-testing policy, he said “reports of the death of irony are much exaggerated.” When another commenter asked about the policy in a reply, he gave a more detailed answer:

“I make a policy of not second-guessing my former colleagues in public, but I agree (and expect a lot of people at the NYT do, too) that the inconsistency is increasingly difficult to defend.”

The Times editorial board recently endorsed legalization of marijuana and featured a series of articles on its stance that included a trippy tour through The Times’ evolving position on marijuana legalization.… Read more

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NYT’s Tyler Hicks on Gaza: ‘It’s impossible to know who’s who’

The New York Times | CNN | Time

On Tuesday, The New York Times’ photojournalist Tyler Hicks spoke with James Estrin for the Times’ Lens blog. Hicks and Estrin spoke about the images coming out of Gaza.

Sometimes people assume that you can have access to everything, that you can see everything. But the fighters are virtually invisible to us. What we do as photographers is document what we can to show that side of the war. There are funerals, there are people being rushed to the hospital, but you can’t differentiate the fighters from the civilians. They are not wearing uniforms. If there is someone coming into the hospital injured, you can’t tell if that’s just a shopkeeper or if this is someone who just fired a rocket towards Israel.

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How journalists covering the Ebola outbreak try to stay safe

That tweet came from CNN international correspondent David McKenzie, who’s currently reporting on the Ebola outbreak from Sierra Leone. On Monday, McKenzie filed this story about how he and other journalists at CNN are staying safe while covering a story with worldwide health implications.

“This is more about just having some basic things, like chlorine and water and all of this, to protect yourself, but also just to calm yourself down in what can be a very emotional and scary reporting trip,” he said in the video.

I’ve started a Twitter list of journalists covering the Ebola outbreak from Sierra Leone, Liberia, Guinea and nearby countries. Who am I missing? Please email or tweet suggestions to me at khare@poynter.org or @kristenhare.… Read more

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5 investigative journalism tips from New York Times’ David Barstow

After a publisher chopped away at one of David Barstow’s early investigative stories, he considered ditching journalism and heading off to law school. Since then, Barstow — now a reporter at The New York Times — has gone on to win three Pulitzer Prizes for journalism that has exposed poor working conditions and bribery in America’s companies and manipulation of the American media.

New York Times investigative reporter David Barstow (right) talks to Butch Ward, senior faculty member at the Poynter Institute at a Master Class. (Photo by Ren LaForme)

But Barstow’s professional journey hasn’t been easy. It’s one that left him with “scar tissue” and an evolving understanding of the best way to approach cagey sources, unyielding spokespersons and impatient editors.

He shared some of that knowledge Friday with senior faculty member Butch Ward for Poynter’s inaugural “Master Class,” a discussion on the trajectory of his career and some of the stories that shaped it.… Read more

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