The New York Times

Robert De Niro

Robert De Niro to NYT reporter: ‘Ya got the part, kid’

Talking Biz News

“Ya got the part, kid.”

It’s safe to say few journalists have rarely heard those words, at least not from Robert De Niro.

But that’s the case for New York Times reporter Diana Henriques, author of a book about Bernie Madoff’s notorious Ponzi scheme, “The Wizard of Lies.” She took a buyout from the newspaper in 2011 but still writes for it.

HBO is adapting her book, with De Niro starring as Madoff, and she auditioned with him several months ago, Chris Roush reports for Talking Biz News.

…In June, and he grilled her for two hours about his mannerisms, his laugh, his sense of humor, and his relative closeness to his two sons.

De Niro and his casting director liked how it went well enough to ask her back the next day to read a scene with him. Read more

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Trump tsunami dominates evening newscasts, survey confirms

CNN

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at FreedomFest, Saturday, July 11, 2015, in Las Vegas. Trump said his comments about immigration have become a movement and has pointed to violence perpetrated by immigrants in the U.S. illegally to defend his stance. (AP Photo/John Locher)

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at FreedomFest, Saturday, July 11, 2015, in Las Vegas. Trump said his comments about immigration have become a movement and has pointed to violence perpetrated by immigrants in the U.S. illegally to defend his stance. (AP Photo/John Locher)

He’s video clickbait.

“Since the first Republican presidential debate, Donald Trump has received more attention on the nightly news than his 16 rivals — combined.”

Looking for news about John Kasich or Chris Christie or Rick Santorum? Well, good luck since an analysis for CNN’s “Reliable Sources” offers a seemingly empirical take on what has seemed obvious: You’d need the Navy SEALS to find much coverage of The Others.

Trump coverage doubled all the other coverage on nightly newscasts on NBC, CBS and ABC between Aug. Read more

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Nobel Prize-winner blasts The New York Times for publishing ‘gossip’

The New York Times

Famed Peruvian author Mario Vargas Llosa, who received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2010, slammed The New York Times on Sunday for publishing what he called “slanderous and perfidious” gossip culled from an article published by The Daily Mail.

In a letter to the editor headlined “Mario Vargas Llosa Responds,” the author called the Times to task for its Aug. 17 review of his new nonfiction book, “Notes on the Death of Culture: Essays on Spectacle and Society” by author Joshua Cohen.

“I am flabbergasted to learn that this kind of gossip can work its way into a respectable publication such as the Book Review,” Vargas Llosa wrote.

Vargas Llosa’s objections stem from a passage at the end of the review (which has since been changed) that details an alleged relationship between the author and Isabel Preysler, a socialite and television host. Read more

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New York Times apologizes for using ‘slave mistress’ in obit

The New York Times

Margaret Sullivan, public editor of The New York Times, has been busy of late, especially with criticism of the paper’s weekend expose of Amazon’s work culture. The flap included her mild dueling with the newspaper’s executive editor over the piece (she thought it had flaws, he didn’t).

Well, they are in sync Thursday with the paper having erred on Saturday in a long, front page obituary of Julian Bond, the civil rights leader.

It included the line, “Julian Bond’s great-grandmother Jane Bond was the slave mistress of a Kentucky farmer.”

Many readers protested to Sullivan “on the grounds that a slave, by definition, can’t be in the kind of consensual or romantic relationship that the word ‘mistress’ suggests.’ One of them noted it wasn’t the first time the phrase had appeared in a Times obituary.”

Executive Editor Dean Baquet, the paper’s first African-American executive editor, told her that it was a clear mistake. Read more

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Commentary: Amazon whiffs in response to New York Times report

Amazon was not at its prime this weekend when it rush-delivered an object lesson in the wrong way to handle negative publicity — especially when the CEO of the company owns one of America’s most prominent newspapers.

Over the weekend, The New York Times published a harsh exposé that purported to lay bare a culture of workaholism that pervades the ranks of online retail giant Amazon. Drawing on interviews from more than 100 current and former employees, the article described an unforgiving workplace powered by “Amabots,” company-speak for the automaton-like state achieved by the most hardcore employees.

Such was the impact of the story that even the notoriously camera-shy Amazon made some of its employees available for on-the-record interviews. Their quotes come off sounding like airbrushed corporate-speak when compared to the harrowing anecdotes relayed by other staffers.

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New York Times Co. reports big progress in digital for the second quarter

The New York Times Co. had the same print advertising woes as the rest of the industry — with revenues down 13 percent year to year in the second quarter. But with strong digital performance, reported today,  it held total revenue loss to just 1.5 percent.

That, combined with a reduction in expenses, allowed the company to earn net income of $16.4 million on revenues of $382.9 million for the quarter, a profit margin of about 4 percent.

Digital-only subscriptions passed the one million mark. And the company expects to grow that total by 35,000 more in the third quarter.

CEO Mark Thompson said in a conference call with analysts that the Times’ push to sell more international subscriptions, started last year, is paying off. Those now account for 13 percent of the total. Read more

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The New York Times goes native with video advertising

The New York Times. (AP Photo)

The New York Times. (AP Photo)

The New York Times plans to introduce a video version of native advertising this fall, tailored to smartphone display and with presentation formats targeted to specific times of the day.

The new offering goes by the slightly highfalutin label “Mobile Moments.” According a Times news release this morning, the commercial content will emphasize storytelling, often with an entertaining or inspiring component. These will be produced either by advertisers themselves or by the same 40-person T Brand Studio that already does text-based native ads (which the Times call “paid posts”).

Sebastian Tomich, senior vice president of advertising and innovation, who runs the Times native advertising effort, told Ad Age the new format (which will include variants like graphics or interactives) is an antidote to irritating and not very effective interstitial banners that display poorly on smartphones. Read more

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New York Review of Books responds to New York Times’ rebuttal of nails’ exposé critique

New York Review of Books

Richard Bernstein continued his beef with the New York Times’ nail salon exposé and says the editor’s response was late and insufficient.

Bernstein’s article, published on the New York Review of Books website on Friday, came in response to the letter issued by New York Times editors earlier this week. And so, the debate rages on over ‘Unvarnished’ by Times Reporter Sarah Maslin Nir.

The Times’ rebuttal called his critique as “industry advocacy” while Bernstein responded by focusing on the paper’s lack of response to its allegation that classified advertisements don’t offer $10 a day for workers, as was reported by the story. Bernstein is a part owner of two New York City day spas that are operated by his wife and sister-in-law, both Chinese natives, in an industry with many Asian immigrants. Read more

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Obtaining government officials’ business emails should be easier

This is another in a series of articles by the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press covering legal issues that affect journalists. RCFP’s Legal Fellow Kristin Bergman wrote this article.

In this 2011 file photo, then-Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton checks her Blackberry from inside a C-17 military plane. South Carolina Republican Trey Gowdy, wants to know why the panel has no emails from the day the photo was taken as Clinton, then the secretary of state, was en route to Tripoli. (AP Photo/Kevin Lamarque, Pool, File)

In this 2011 file photo, then-Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton checks her Blackberry from inside a C-17 military plane. South Carolina Republican Trey Gowdy, wants to know why the panel has no emails from the day the photo was taken as Clinton, then the secretary of state, was en route to Tripoli. (AP Photo/Kevin Lamarque, Pool, File)

This spring, Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton came under fire when the State Department disclosed her exclusive use of a personal email server during her time as Secretary of State.

This raised major transparency concerns because she used a private account and her email correspondence was not available for production when the State Department received Freedom of Information Act requests. Read more

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Are there ‘Clinton rules’ that drive unfair media coverage?

With their hats providing only a bit of privacy, the Clintons continued their vacation at Martha's Vineyard, Saturday, Aug. 30, 1997, with President Bill Clinton offering some golfing advice to first lady Hillary Rodham Clinton at the Mink Meadows Golf Club in Vineyard Haven, Mass. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)

With their hats providing only a bit of privacy, the Clintons continued their vacation at Martha’s Vineyard, Saturday, Aug. 30, 1997, with President Bill Clinton offering some golfing advice to first lady Hillary Rodham Clinton at the Mink Meadows Golf Club in Vineyard Haven, Mass. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)

The relationship between Hillary Clinton and the press is complex and contentious. But is there an “unspoken set of ‘Clinton rules’” that drives media coverage?

Political writer Jonathan Allen makes such a case in Vox, pegging his thesis to a bungled New York Times story about a federal investigation of her emails as Secretary of State.

Instant criticisms prompted changes in the original story by the paper, a column by the paper’s public editor and an editor’s note. Read more

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