Articles about "The New York Times"


Career Beat: Arianna Huffington to get new chief of staff

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • Elise Hu will be NPR’s Asia correspondent in Seoul. She covers tech and culture at NPR. (Poynter)
  • Mitra Kalita is now executive editor-at-large for Quartz. Previously, she was ideas editor there. Paul Smalera will be Quartz’ new ideas editor. He is editor of The New York Times opinion app. (Poynter)
  • Donald Baer is now chairman of PBS’ board of directors. He is CEO of Burson-Marsteller. (PBS)
  • Jessica Coen is now a contributing editor at Marie Claire. She is an editor-at-large with Jezebel. (Fishbowl NY)
  • Stephen Lacy is now chairman of the Association of Magazine Media. He is CEO of the Meredith Corporation. (Email)
  • Dan Katz will be chief of staff to Arianna Huffington. He’s currently a chief researcher for David Gergen. Maxwell Strachan is now senior editor of business and tech at The Huffington Post. Previously, he was business editor there. (email)
  • Emily Yoshida will be entertainment editor at The Verge. Previously, she was culture editor at Grantland. (Muck Rack)

Job of the day: The Virginian-Pilot is looking for a digital news editor. Ger your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs)

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NYT added 44,000 digital subscribers in the third quarter

The New York Times Company

The New York Times Company added 44,000 subscribers to its digital-only products in the third quarter of 2014, “an increase of more than 20 percent compared with the end of the third quarter of 2013,” it says in its third-quarter earnings report, released Thursday.

The company says it now has 875,000 subscribers to digital-only products. It added 32,000 subscribers in the second quarter.

Revenue at the company was a little better than flat: up about 1 percent overall, with circulation revenue up 1.6 percent, advertising revenue down .4 percent and other revenue — including events — up about 4 percent.

Print ad revenue was down about 5 percent, and digital ad revenue was up 16.5 percent. Operating costs rose 9 percent, “mainly due to severance expense associated with previously disclosed workforce reductions as well as higher compensation and benefits expenses primarily related to the Company’s strategic initiatives,” the release says.

Times digital honcho Denise Warren left the company this week, part of what Times Co. President and CEO Mark Thompson calls a “reorganization that is intended to accelerate the development of our digital consumer business by creating separate marketing and digital divisions.” He continues: “Our audience development efforts also remain a top priority, with the goal of extending our already broad reach and deepening the engagement of our readers.” Read more

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Mitra Kalita is Quartz’ executive editor-at-large

Quartz Editor-in-Chief Kevin Delaney announced Wednesday that ideas editor Mitra Kalita will become executive editor-at-large for Quartz, charged with “spearheading projects” that “build up our readership and journalism globally.”

In a memo to Quartz staff (below), Delaney noted Kalita — who was recently named an adjunct faculty member at Poynter — played a “central role” in the creation of the business vertical’s Ideas section and the launch of Quartz India.

In an interview with World News Publishing Focus, Kalita said Quartz is considering expanding to cover other subjects:

We are looking at other markets and other niches but a part of our ethos is driven by this idea that you and I have a lot in common, and might be harried by some of the same factors of life and work. Does that story need to come from a place of geography? Probably not. In some cases geography will be where we expand but in others it’s going to be by obsession or theme areas.

Kalita will be replaced by Paul Smalera, editor of The New York Times opinion app, which is slated to be discontinued at the end of the month. Smalera was also the founding editor of the Times’ Op-Talk site, according to a memo from Delaney announcing his hire (also below).

Hello Quartz -

I’m happy to announce the appointment of Mitra Kalita as Quartz’s executive editor at large, with special responsibility for global expansion and Ideas.

This move reflects Mitra’s central role from Quartz’s beginning through the present, including building up Ideas and launching Quartz India. As many of you know, her contributions extend far beyond that to touch pretty much all aspects of Quartz, including identifying and bringing on many of our talented colleagues.

Since the beginning, Mitra has focused on the people and “the story.” She’s helped us deliver on being a news organization that truly covers the world, while tackling some of the most intimate and challenging issues in our lives and workplaces. Mitra’s wide range of interests is partly what makes her so effective—she knows international news for us to pursue ambitiously when she sees it, such as Modi’s appearance in NYC, and hot button issues that hit home on Facebook, such as the ubiquity of one company’s baby blankets. It goes without saying that Mitra specializes in keeping all of us on our toes.

In her new role, she will spearhead projects that stretch Quartz further and build up our readership and journalism globally. These include new initiatives focused outside of the US. She’ll also continue to work with the Ideas team as we build on its success.

Mitra will continue to work part-time for Quartz and report her (fourth) book through the end of this school year, and return full-time after that.

Please join me in congratulating her.

Best,
Kevin

Hello Quartz –

I’m happy to announce that Paul Smalera will join us as Quartz’s Ideas editor as of November 5.

Paul comes from the New York Times, where he was the founding editor of its Op-Talk site and led the editorial team for the NYT Opinion iPhone app.

Paul is an entrepreneurial, tech-savvy journalist with hands-on experience editing the sort of global commentary that is the core fare of Quartz’s Ideas section. One former colleague describes him as “the real deal” and “very astute about reader platforms and social media, very curious about the world, very savvy as to what readers want.” Since before the launch of Quartz, I’ve hoped for an opening to bring him on to join us.

Paul earlier worked at Reuters, where he was technology editor, product manager for a new content management system, and deputy opinion editor. He also was a senior editor for technology coverage at Fortune and spent seven years as a professional web developer.

Paul’s mandate is to be bold and creative in approaching Ideas, experimenting with the form, approach, and outside contributors we work with. His efforts will build on the work that Mitra, Lauren, and Annalisa have done to make Ideas pieces among the most lively, impactful, and well-read content that we publish.

Please join me in welcoming Paul.

Best,
Kevin

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Career Beat: HuffPost names Lilly Workneh Black Voices editor

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • Leigh Weingus is now trends editor at The Huffington Post. Previously, she was TV editor there. Carolyn Gregoire is now a senior writer for health and science at The Huffington Post. Previously, she was an editor at Healthy Hiving and The Third Metric there. Lilly Workneh is now Black Voices editor at The Huffington Post. Previously, she was lifestyle editor at thegrio.com (Email)
  • Rich Ross is president of the Discovery Channel. Previously, he was chief executive of Shine America (The New York Times)
  • Monique Chenault is now executive producer of “The Insider”. Previously, she was a senior producer at “Access Hollywood”. (Mediabistro)

Job of the day: BuzzFeed is looking for a news fellow. Get your résumés in! (BuzzFeed)

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Why NYT avoids quoting climate-change skeptics

The New York Times

In a Times Insider interview, Adam Bryant, The New York Times’ new environment editor, answers the question “To what extent should we feel obligated to include the views of climate change skeptics?”

“Claims that the entire field of climate science is some kind of giant hoax do not hold water, and we have made a conscious decision that we are not going to take that point of view seriously,” Bryant replies. He continues:

At the same time, there is a huge amount of legitimate debate and uncertainty within mainstream science. Scientists are pretty open about not being sure how bad things will get, or how quickly. These are the valid scientific issues and uncertainties that we want to cover.

Bryant also says a recent Justin Gillis story “provides a good example of providing informed second opinions on a topic.”

In his piece, Justin quoted an expert who has often been skeptical of claimed links between weather events and global warming in the past. But in this new study we were reporting on, he said the evidence was strong. That insight is more useful to readers than quoting someone who believes the entire field of study is built on a pillar of sand.

In 2013, the Times merged its environment pod with its science desk and shuttered its Green blog. Times Public Editor Margaret Sullivan wrote last November that she found the Times had subsequently covered climate issues less, but she recently called the Times’ new enviro team “very good news.” Read more

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Peter Lattman named deputy business editor at The New York Times

New York Times media editor Peter Lattman will be deputy business editor at the paper, according to a memo from New York Times Business editor Dean Murphy:

Peter will come back to the 2nd floor wearing two hats. He will direct our media coverage along with Bill Brink and Craig Hunter, while also applying his smarts and journalistic skills as deputy editor to our broader business report.

Here’s the full memo:

About a year ago, Peter moved upstairs to become media editor. He quickly combined a hotshot crew of Times veterans and newcomers who have continued to make the media report essential reading across the paper. None of that is changing, except for the upstairs part.

Peter will come back to the 2nd floor wearing two hats. He will direct our media coverage along with Bill Brink and Craig Hunter, while also applying his smarts and journalistic skills as deputy editor to our broader business report. Peter’s knowledge of business, Wall Street and beyond is deep, having been a reporter for DealBook, The Wall Street Journal and, back in the day, a money guy at Goldman Sachs (and even a lawyer before that).

Media reporters will continue to write for BizDay, Culture and other sections, with Mr. Media himself, David Carr, anchoring the Monday business report. More broadly, the media team will benefit from greater interaction and crosspollination with reporters and editors from tech, DealBook and the other clusters — and vice versa. In short, we’ll see collaboration, elevation and innovation among a whole new mix of talented reporters and editors.

I’m very excited to have Peter at my side as we think ambitiously and creatively about how best to tell the story of business and the economy in our changing media landscape. Equally important, we both feel great responsibility as stewards of our storied media report, ensuring that it grows only stronger, more vibrant and remains central to the journalistic mission of The Times.

Dean

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Career Beat: Rachel Zarrell named news editor at BuzzFeed News

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • Rachel Zarrell is now news editor at BuzzFeed News. Previously, she was a weekend editor there. (‏@rachelzarrell)
  • Ben Calhoun is now director of content and programming at WBEZ in Chicago. Previously, he was a producer for “This American Life.” (Robert Feder)
  • Ada Guerin is now creative director at The Wrap. Previously, she was design director and associate art director at The Hollywood Reporter. (The Wrap)
  • Jose Zamora is now on the board of directors of the Online News Association. He is director of strategic communications at Univision Network. (ONA)
  • Carla Zanoni will be global audience development director at The Wall Street Journal. Previously, she was director of social media and engagement at DNAinfo.com. (Carla Zanoni)
  • Tara Adiseshan is now a Knight-Mozilla fellow at The New York Times and The Washington Post. Previously, she worked on search design at Autodesk and conducted research focused on harvesting rainwater in India. Juan Elosua is now a Knight-Mozilla fellow at La Nacion. He is a telecommunications engineer and data journalist. Livia Labate is now a Knight-Mozilla fellow at NPR. Previously, she led Marriott’s digital standards and practices group. Linda Sandvik is now a Knight-Mozilla fellow at The Guardian. Previously, she worked in local government. Julia Smith is now a Knight-Mozilla fellow at the Center for Investigative Reporting. Previously, she was a designer and developer on news sites and mobile applications. Francis Tseng is now a Knight-Mozilla fellow at The New York Times and The Washington Post He currently teaches at the New School’s Design + Journalism program. (dansinker.com)
  • Jon Garinn is now medical editor of the Radiology Administration department at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. Previously, he was managing editor of CURE Magazine. (email)

Job of the day: Politico is looking for a lobbying reporter. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs)

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Here are 37 great journalism internships and fellowships for application season

For journalism students, October through January is internship application season, a pressure cooker of equal parts excitement and anxiety.

It’s our profession’s draft day. By mid-march, most of your classmates will have declared their intention to work at a journalism organization, like a prized NFL recruit putting on their team’s hat in front of a live studio audience.

Don’t get left behind. Some of the applications for the most prestigious news organizations are due in a few weeks time, so work up the courage to request that letter of recommendation, update your résumé and figure out how stamps work.

To make the process a little easier, I’ve compiled a list of some of the best journalism internships I could find on the Web, many of which I applied for myself when I was in school. If you have questions about this list or know some great internships I’ve forgotten, tweet them to #POYinternlist or send me an email: bmullin@poynter.org.

The New York Times James Reston Reporting Fellowship
Deadline: Oct. 31
Location: New York City
Pay: $1,000 per week
Description: “Beginning with the second week, the Reston Fellows start work in a section that reflects their skills and area of interest to report and write stories under the guidance of editors or senior reporters. Some stories are assigned, but fellows are encouraged to come up with their own ideas. They also participate in workshops with ranking editors and reporters. The goal of the program is to provide an opportunity for the fellows to stretch their journalistic skills with the help of some of the best reporters and editors in the country.”

The Washington Post
Deadline: Nov. 7
Location: Washington, D.C.
Pay: $750 per week
Description: “Our interns write articles, edit copy, take photographs, design pages and produce graphics. We treat them as staff members during their 12 weeks of employment.”

The Boston Globe
Deadline: Nov. 1
Location: Boston
Pay: $700 per week
Description: “Summer interns work as full-time employees for 12 weeks, between Memorial Day and Labor Day. Interns are paid a weekly wage, and shifts vary. An intern supervisor serves as a writing coach and there are weekly meetings with editors and staff members on a range of issues and topics pertaining to journalism.”

Associated Press Global News Internship
Deadline: Not settled yet; likely the first week of January, per AP spokesman Paul Colford.
Location: Major cities throughout the world
Pay: Not listed
Description: “The summer 2014 Global News Internship is a paid, highly selective, 12-week individually tailored training program for students who are aspiring cross-format journalists. Interns must have experience and/or training in video and one other format. They will contribute to AP’s text, video, photo and interactive reporting.”

Reuters Global Journalism Internships
Deadline: Dec. 1
Location: Major cities throughout the world
Pay: Not listed
Description: “The Reuters Global Journalism Internships offer talented students and graduates an opportunity to learn and shine in our bureaus internationally. The paid internships are a crash course in hands-on business, political and general news reporting. Every intern will report to a senior editor and be assigned a journalist mentor to provide advice and guidance during the summer. They’re expected to write regularly and deliver in-depth stories during their assignment. Interns will receive several days of formal training before they start work, focused on writing skills, journalism ethics and basic financial knowledge. They may also be able to take advantage of other, regularly scheduled training opportunities during the summer, depending on where they’re based.”

Texas Tribune News Apps Internships
Deadline: Nov. 15
Location: Austin, Texas
Pay: $5,000 over 10 weeks
Description: “Are you a journalism student or would-be reporter in another major? Know a little bit about HTML, CSS, JavaScript, and/or Python/Django, and would like to continue to hone your skills? Are you passionate about politics, policy and open government? You should join us. You’ll work directly with news apps developers, reporters and editors in the newsroom. Interns are first-class citizens on our team – in the past, they’ve had the opportunity to not only contribute to high-profile projects but to take the lead on them. You’ll get to create data visualizations and maps, participate in an active and friendly newsroom, play a role in editorial meetings and contribute to a number of different beats. We’re looking for someone passionate about web standards and the little details. Someone willing to show their work. Someone looking to learn. If you’re interested, send your resume and links to previous projects and/or your GitHub account to rmurphy@texastribune.org.”

Texas Tribune reporting internship
Deadline: Nov. 15
Location: Austin, Texas
Pay: $2,000 over 10 weeks
Description: The Texas Tribune internship program provides aspiring journalists the opportunity to hone their reporting skills and learn a host of new ones that will prepare them for the 21st century newsroom. “This is not a teaching hospital,” in the words of our fearless leader, CEO and Editor-in-Chief Evan Smith. We expect interns who are anxious to dive into daily news coverage alongside our seasoned reporting staff. Interns at the Tribune write stories and blog posts, shoot photos and video, develop news apps and assist with our major data projects. Intern work has appeared in Texas editions of The New York Times through our partnership with the most prestigious newspaper in the country.

Reuters Journalism Program
Deadline: Dec. 15
Location: New York, London or Asia
Pay: Not listed
Description: “The Reuters Journalism Program offers nine months of hands-on, real-world experience with competitive pay in New York, London and Asia. You will gain a deep grounding in all aspects of financial reporting, work on fast-paced news stories and develop skills in enterprise journalism. The program seeks rising reporters, recent graduates or business professionals who can demonstrate a clear commitment to a career in journalism and an ability to generate story ideas relevant for a Reuters audience.”

The Los Angeles Times
Deadline: Jan. 1
Location: Los Angeles, Washington D.C.
Pay: $700 per week
Description: “Interested in working with some of the best journalists around? We offer 10 weeks of intensive, hands-on experience in a region where big stories are the norm. We place interns throughout the L.A. Times: Metro/Local, Sports, Business, Features (Home, Image, Travel, Food, Mind & Body), Arts & Entertainment, Editorial Pages, Washington, D.C., bureau, Photography/Video, Data Desk, Visualization & Graphics, Design and latimes.com. These are paid internships and summer placements usually run from mid-June to late August.”

The Tampa Bay Times
Deadline: Nov. 1
Location: St. Petersburg, Tampa, Clearwater, Port Richey and Brooksville
Pay: $450 per week
Description: “Florida’s largest and best newspaper, with 10 Pulitzer Prizes, is looking for energetic, talented young people for internships in all of its departments. Internships range from 12-week summer experiences to 6-month and 1-year jobs. You will be considered a full staff member and work alongside colleagues who will serve as mentors. Our internship programs are designed to give you hands-on experience to add to your academic credentials.

The South Florida Sun Sentinel
Deadline: Nov. 15
Location: Fort Lauderdale
Pay: $7.93 per hour
Description: “We offer seven paid internships throughout our digital-print newsroom. For 11 intensive weeks, from June to mid-August, you will report and write stories, shoot and edit video-photo, or design. We treat our interns as regular staffers, under the guidance of seasoned journalists. We offer internships in various newsroom departments: Metro-news, business, features, sports, video-photo, design, and our Spanish-language weekly, El Sentinel. We also offer weekly sessions with veteran journalists and senior editors on a wide range of topics, including career advice. It’s hard work and great fun.”

Google Journalism Fellowship
Deadline: Around the end of January
Location: Various journalism nonprofits throughout the United States
Pay: $8,000 for 10-weeks, plus $1,000 travel stipend
Description: “The program is aimed at undergraduate, graduate and journalism students interested in using technology to tell stories in new and dynamic ways. The Fellows will get the opportunity to spend the summer contributing to a variety of organizations — from those that are steeped in investigative journalism to those working for press freedom around the world and to those that are helping the industry figure out its future in the digital age.”
Disclaimer: I was a 2014 Google fellow.

Atlantic Media Fellowship Program
Deadline: End of February 2015
Location: Washington, D.C. and New York City
Pay: $25,000 per year, with full benefits
Description: “Atlantic Media offers high-achieving recent college graduates a unique opportunity to participate in the Atlantic Media Fellowship Program. The Program is a structured, year-long paid fellowship for top-tier talent committed to editorial-side or business-side careers in media. Each year we look forward to our new class of Fellows, who add a fresh perspective and new ideas to our company initiatives. As a digital-first company, we have experienced tremendous growth as a result of emphasis on digital initiatives, and our Fellows have been key contributors.”

The Seattle Times
Deadline: Nov. 15.
Location: Seattle
Pay: $540 per week
Description: “The Seattle Times offers paid summer internships to outstanding students pursuing a career in journalism. For 10 weeks, interns work on varied assignments and attend weekly training sessions with members of a Pulitzer Prize-winning staff. Interns receive a skill-development plan and work with a staff mentor to achieve it. Internships are open to sophomores, juniors, seniors and graduate students attending a four-year college or university. Applicants must have a demonstrated commitment to print and online journalism. At least one previous internship at a daily news organization is preferred, and multimedia experience is a plus.”

Austin American-Statesman
Deadline: Nov. 7
Location: Austin, Texas
Pay: $450 per week, plus free housing.
Description: “Our objective is to help interns grow with challenging assignments. In other words, you won’t spend your time writing police briefs, taking mug shots and running errands. Last summer, one intern finished with three dozen bylines, three-quarters of which were on the front page or the Metro cover.”

The Chicago Tribune
Deadline: Dec. 1
Location: Chicago
Pay: Not listed
Description: “The Chicago Tribune’s newsroom internship program seeks college juniors, seniors and graduate students for 12-week paid internships. Opportunities will be considered in all newsroom departments: metro, sports, business, graphics, copy editing, design, photo/video, entertainment, events, social media and lifestyle.”

The Dallas Morning News
Deadline: Oct. 31
Location: Dallas
Pay: $15 per hour
Description: “We offer several 12-week college internships for news reporting, copy editing, business news, features, sports, photography and our website, dallasnews.com. Interns are treated as full-time staffers and typically, at least one is hired for a full-time position at the conclusion of the internship.”

Student Press Law Center
Deadline: Jan. 31
Location: Washington, D.C.
Pay: $3,500 stipend
Description: “Journalism interns research, write and help edit the Report, the Center’s magazine that chronicles student press law cases and controversies from around the country. Interns also write breaking news and analysis pieces for the Center’s website. Those with an interest in video and multimedia are especially encouraged to apply, and help us create the images that will bring students’ censorship experiences to life.”

The Oregonian
Deadline: Nov. 1
Location: Portland, Oregon
Pay: $440 per week
Description: “Oregonian Media Group offers a 10-week summer intern program for college students who wish to work as multimedia journalists in The Oregonian newsroom. We’re looking for primarily upperclassmen with previous internship experience who want to work in a digital-first environment doing smart stories for readers of OREGONLIVE.COM online and The Oregonian in print. We want critical thinkers, students who have a portfolio that shows ambition and skill across platforms, reporters and photographers who want to make a difference with readers – however those readers find us.
If selected, you will be assigned to a team for the summer, paired with a staff mentor and provided opportunities to learn from experienced journalists through group discussions with other interns.”

NPR’s Kroc Fellowship:
Deadline: Dec. 31
Location: NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., and member station.
Pay:: $40,000 per year
Description: “The Fellowship is designed to offer exposure to various units at NPR, in both the News and Digital Divisions, and at an NPR Member Station. NPR Kroc Fellows work alongside some of the nation’s most respected reporters, producers and editors and receive regular instruction in writing for radio and on-air performance. The Fellowship begins in August and lasts one year. Fellows receive a stipend of more than $40,000 and benefits, including paid vacation. NPR will provide Kroc Fellows with professional guidance and assist in job placement.”

Pulliam Journalism Fellowship
Deadline: Nov. 1
Location: Indianapolis and Phoenix
Pay: $650 per week
Description: “You’ll be a member of our newsroom, work hard and gain valuable journalism experience. You get paid, too. Our Pulliam Fellows earn $650/week for the 10-week program. You’ll also get to participate in writing workshops and learn over lunch from some of the best minds in journalism.”

Minneapolis Star Tribune
Deadline: Nov. 1
Location: Minneapolis
Pay:: $706 per week
Description: “The Star Tribune newsroom offers one of the best summer internship programs available in our industry. We select at least 10 candidates for paid 10-week internships each summer. The program targets college and graduate students interested in pursuing careers as reporters, copy editors/multiplatform editors, designers, photographers and multimedia producers.”

Chronicle of Higher Education
Deadline: Jan. Read more

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The New York Times might be snapping you soon

A Wednesday staff memo announcing the hire of New York Times deputy editor of audience development Justin Bank noted that he will be in charge of formulating “strategies for all existing and new social platforms (Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest but also new ones like Snapchat and WhatsApp).”

At least one Poynter follower wondered publicly whether that means The Gray Lady is jumping onto Snapchat.

The answer? Maybe, says Danielle Rhoades Ha, a spokesperson for The New York Times. Although The Times doesn’t currently have Snapchat or WhatsApp accounts, the paper “may experiment on those platforms.”

RELATED: Here’s how to use Snapchat (and how not to use Snapchat)

If The Times starts snapping its readers, it won’t be the first news organization to do so. The Washington Post, NPR and NowThisNews have all used the ephemeral messaging app to engage with their audiences. In August, BuzzFeed announced a new division that would use social platforms, including Snapchat, to propagate its content. Read more

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There’s ‘Bad News About The News’ (but also a little good news)

When The Brookings Institution asked Robert Kaiser to write an essay about the state of journalism, they asked that the last section include some solutions.

“And I had to tell them when I was finished that there would be no such section,” said Kaiser, who worked for more than 50 years at The Washington Post and retired in February. Kaiser is also the author of several books, including “The News About The News.” His essay for Brookings, which came out Thursday, is entitled “The Bad News About the News.”

In several chapters he looks both back and ahead at American journalism.

“I have to say that that process made me less optimistic than I had been before it began,” Kaiser said in a phone interview.

It’s misleading, Kaiser said, to look at all the great journalists and platforms and what they’re producing online and think journalism is in good shape. There’s still no real business model.

From his essay:

Despite two decades of trying, no one has found a way to make traditional news-gathering sufficiently profitable to assure its future survival. Serious readers of America’s most substantial news media may find this description at odds with their daily experience. After all, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Washington Post still provide rich offerings of good journalism every morning, and they have been joined by numerous online providers of both opinion and news—even of classic investigative reporting. Digital publications employ thousands of reporters and editors in new and sometimes promising journalistic enterprises. Is this a disaster?

Of course not—yet. But today’s situation is probably misleading. The laws of economics cannot be ignored or repealed. Nor can the actuarial tables. Only about a third of Americans under 35 look at a newspaper even once a week, and the percentage declines every year. A large portion of today’s readers of the few remaining good newspapers are much closer to the grave than to high school. Today’s young people skitter around the Internet like ice skaters, exercising their short attention spans by looking for fun and, occasionally, seeking out serious information. Audience taste seems to be changing, with the result that among young people particularly there is a declining appetite for the sort of information packages the great newspapers provided, which included national, foreign and local news, business news, cultural news and criticism, editorials and opinion columns, sports and obituaries, lifestyle features, and science news.

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“I believe that the crucial factor in the future of journalism of the kind that democracy depends on is the survival of a small but vibrant group of really first class institutions that have shared values and traditions and the capacity to train and cultivate the next generation capable of doing this work,” Kaiser said.

The kind of investigative journalism that comes out of the Post, the Times and the Journal is hard work, he said. “It’s not something any old blogger can walk through the door and do.”

Long term, what happens if a new business model isn’t found and those papers fold?

“My pessimism is dependent, I should confess freely, on my theory that if we don’t have a New York Times, Washington Post or Wall Street Journal, we’re a much lesser place than we were with them.”

Now for the good news. Kaiser does see a few things that are working. The first is the ProPublica model.

“They’re a fourth pillar in that universe with the other three,” he said. “However, it depends on the will of people to pay for it as an act of charity.”

And that, he said, isn’t really a business model.

The other comes from Post owner Jeff Bezos, and Kaiser calls it the angel investor solution. For someone with Bezos’ money, owning the Post probably costs him the equivalent of lunch money.

The problem is, Kaiser said, Bezos is competitive.

“He won’t like idea that The Washington Post lives because he props it up. He would much prefer, I’m sure, to invent the new business model and, God willing, he’ll do that.”

Kaiser is also encouraged by sites such as Vox, The Upshot from the Times and Wonkblog from the Post.

“That’s good because policy is traditionally short changed in American journalism.”

There are also local sites, including Voice of San Diego, that provide a service to their communities.

“It’s entirely plausible to me that my doomsday scenario is accurate but won’t be seen to be happening for some number of years,” Kaiser said. “That’s possible. It’s also possible it could happen much faster.”

Correction: An earlier version of this story used the word invest instead of invent in a quote. Read more

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