The New York Times

Paul Krugman didn’t know he was on Twitter until he had more than a half-million followers

The New York Times

Most journalists must toil away in 140-character dispatches for years before they manage to accrue a hefty Twitter following. Not so for New York Times columnist Paul Krugman, who had 600,000 followers before he realized his Twitter feed was extant. Here’s an excerpt from an item published early this morning titled “Blogging Begins.”

A proper blog came much later, when I realized that I wanted a place to put the backstory behind my Times columns; the Times added a Twitter feed (which I didn’t even know existed until Andy Rosenthal casually mentioned that I had 600,000 followers). And so here we are today.

Krugman now has more than a million followers on Twitter.

(h/t Ezra Klein) Read more

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Publishing news direct to Facebook is a big step — but the Apocalypse is not upon us

Sceeenshot from Facebook

Sceeenshot from Facebook

My read on Facebook’s deal with nine news publishers to post some material direct to the platform: yes, it’s a significant business development but by no means apocalyptic, as some commentators are suggesting.

Here’s why:

Good company: It was artful of Facebook and the publishers to assemble nine prominent brands to launch the experiment  — including new media exemplar BuzzFeed, magazine-based National Geographic and four international titles.

Were this just The New York Times, for instance, one would wonder whether the opportunity and deal terms were a one-off match to their business situation.  Not so with this roster.

Favorable revenue split:  The publishers will (for now at least) get 100 percent of revenue for ads they sell and 70 percent of those Facebook sells.  Read more

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Report: NYT will begin publishing within Facebook tomorrow

New York | The Wall Street Journal | The New York Times

A much-anticipated publishing partnership between Facebook and major news outlets such as The New York Times, BuzzFeed and National Geographic is on the eve of its debut, according to a report published Tuesday in New York.

On Wednesday, The New York Times is expected to begin publishing articles within Facebook as part of the social network’s “Instant Articles” program, a major shift that has been on the horizon since October, when late New York Times columnist David Carr described the initiative’s contours in his weekly column.

The partnership, which has gradually come into focus with successive media reports as its launch date approached, will purportedly reduce the amount of time readers have to wait for articles to load. Read more

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de Blasio accidentally sends NYT reporter email about subway gripes

New York | The New York Times

A New York Times story published Tuesday morning documenting Mayor Bill de Blasio’s subway angst was made possible by an errant email sent to a reporter from the paper. Michael Grynbaum explains how the “stern, bullet-pointed missive” found its way to a Times reporter’s inbox:

Mr. de Blasio, who has been making a concerted effort to repair his reputation for tardiness, copied two senior aides on the email, including his chief of staff. The mayor, by accident, added another recipient as well: a reporter for The New York Times.

Writing for New York, Jessica Roy raises the possibility that the wayward gripe wasn’t sent by accident at all, but instead a clever ploy to play up the mayor’s everyman sensibilities. Read more

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NYT: From now on, it’s Bernie Sanders, not Bernard

Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., speaks during a town hall meeting at the Culinary Workers Union Tuesday, March 31, 2015, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher)

Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., speaks during a town hall meeting at the Culinary Workers Union Tuesday, March 31, 2015, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher)

The New York Times

Nearly anybody who reports on or knows the junior U.S. Senator from Vermont calls him Bernie Sanders, not Bernard, Bern or Big B.

Now, The New York Times belatedly joins them.

In an informally formal concession to a well-accepted informality, the paper breezily disclosed Thursday morning that it was ditching its traditional style and saying farewell to “Senator Bernard Sanders of Vermont.”

The Brooklyn-born, self-styled socialist (technically he’s an Independent) has decided to run for the Democratic presidential nomination. In that light, Alan Rappeport’s “First Draft” on politics morning newsletter confronted the nomenclature issue.

But many readers had concerns with First Draft’s coverage of Mr.

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The New York Times dabbles in virtual reality

The New York Times Co. | Wired

On Monday, The New York Times offered a view of a virtual reality experiment, according to a press release from The New York Times Co. The virtual reality film, “Walking New York,” focuses on the artist who created the art for the most recent cover of The New York Times Magazine.

The virtual reality film, titled “Walking New York,” takes viewers through the making of the Magazine’s cover, for which JR took a photo of a recent immigrant to New York and pasted a 150-foot-tall version of the portrait on the Flatiron Plaza in Manhattan. The final cover photograph is a shot of the portrait taken from a helicopter above the city. The film, narrated by JR, lets viewers experience every aspect of the process, from the initial photo shoot on the street, to the studio work, to the pasting, to the helicopter ride.

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Sports writers snubbed by the Pulitzer committee, again

Pulitzer_Medal_color300dpiDave Anderson never expected the call. In 1981, the New York Times sports columnist learned he was the recipient of the Pulitzer Prize for commentary.

“It really came as a surprise,” Anderson said. “I didn’t even know I was nominated.”

Anderson, now 85 and still churning out the occasional column for the Times, recalled his big honor Monday just minutes before the announcement of the 2015 Pulitzer Prizes. He had hoped the list of winners would include someone from his old press box gang, but he knew it was a long shot.

“They don’t pick many people from sports,” Anderson said.

Indeed, it was another year when sports were snubbed by the Pulitzers. The sportswriters went 0 for 14 in the Pulitzer’s journalism categories. There was only one sports-related story among the finalists: Walt Bogdanich and Mike McIntire of the New York Times in national reporting for stories exposing preferential police treatment for Florida State football players who are accused of sexual assault and other criminal offenses. Read more

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NYT editors are now selecting stories specifically for mobile devices

The New York Times

The New York Times Wednesday announced the rollout of a new version of its core iOS app, touting “a more urgent” news experience with stories chosen for mobile readers.

The latest update is in line with a series of product announcements from The New York Times. Earlier this month, the paper debuted the NYT Cooking iPhone app; shortly after that, the Times announced it was making its millennial-targeted news app, NYT Now, free for all users upon its May relaunch.

The Times noted in its announcement that the updated app marks the first time that editors are now designating stories to appear specifically on mobile devices. The app also now packages related articles and multimedia elements together and features weekday briefings to keep users abreast of daily news. Read more

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NYT takes 36 Hours from print to screen with Travel Channel

NYTCo

The New York Times’ “36 Hours” column will become a Travel Channel show, the Times announced Tuesday. “Top Chef” winner Kristen Kish and U.S. soccer pro Kyle Martino will host six episodes “timed to coincide with new or updated New York Times 36 Hours newspaper columns,” according to the press release.

In each one-hour episode of “36 Hours,” co-hosts Kristen Kish and Kyle Martino arrive in a new city where they’ll have 36 hours to explore the most delicious foods and hot spots, meet fascinating local insiders and experience the best attractions unique to each destination. Their itineraries will be informed by New York Times editors and contributors who bring extensive research and expertise in each locale. Six episodes are green-lit for production.

Here’s a preview:

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Rumors about Pulitzer winners have been scarce

As newsrooms prepare for today’s 3 p.m. YouTube livestream of the Pulitzer Prize revelations – identifying 2015’s top U.S. journalism awards in 14 categories – rumors about winners and finalists have seemed scarce.

Unlike the Academy Awards and other major competitions, Pulitzer finalists officially are kept secret in advance. When winners are announced, two finalists in each division, typically, are listed at the same time. Back in February, panels of jurors selected three “nominated finalists”; the Pulitzer board made the final choices in meetings last Thursday and Friday.

Until five years ago, an elaborate rumor mill “outed” most finalists early – something that was interrupted only by a concerted effort by now-retired Pulitzer administrator Sig Gissler, who managed to get jurors to hold their nominations close to the vest. Read more

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