The New York Times

Margaret Sullivan: Article on Serena Williams and body image ‘a missed opportunity’

The New York Times

New York Times Public Editor Margaret Sullivan wrote Monday about Friday’s article by Ben Rothenberg on female athletes and body image.

I see this article as a missed opportunity to really get under the surface of a pervasive and troubling issue in women’s sports and, particularly, women’s tennis.

Mr. Rothenberg had enviable access to top players and the kernel of an important, provocative idea. But the piece was “just so uncritical,” said Pat Griffin, professor emerita at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, the author of “Strong Women, Deep Closets,” and a consultant on sports and discrimination.

“Sacrificing your femininity is a really old narrative in women’s sports,” Ms. Griffin told me by phone. “There is a whole new narrative breaking through — that women athletes come in all sizes, shapes and forms.

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News outlets vie for global audiences with translated stories

The New York Times published a two-part investigation into the city's nail salons in four languages.

The New York Times published a two-part investigation into the city’s nail salons in four languages.

In May, after more than a year of planning, investigating, writing and editing, The New York Times was almost ready to publish an investigation from reporter Sarah Maslin Nir that would reveal ghastly working conditions in nail salons throughout New York City. Almost.

It was the eve of publication. Elisabeth Goodridge, the deputy editor for the paper’s metro section, was lingering in the newsroom, waiting for the last elements of the story to come in. The article had been translated into three languages — Korean, Chinese and Spanish — but Goodridge had not yet received everything required for the finished product. She finally left The Times’ Manhattan headquarters at around 10 p.m. Read more

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The New York Times told people to add peas to guac. People said nope.

On Wednesday, a New York Times food story suggested readers add peas to their guacamole. Here’s the tweet:

But readers refused. Here are some of their tweets:

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John Carroll, who led the Los Angeles Times to 13 Pulitzer Prizes, dies at 73

The New York Times | Los Angeles Times

John Carroll, who buoyed the Los Angeles Times during a period of financial headwinds and guided the staff to more than a dozen Pulitzer wins during his five-year tenure as editor, died Sunday of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. He was 73.

The Los Angeles Times, which Carroll helmed from the spring of 2000 to 2005, described him as “a courageous editor” who possessed an “instinct for the big story and unrelenting focus on the craft of journalism.” The paper also acknowledged his contributions, which included an emphasis on investigative reporting and beat coverage in addition to his hiring of talented journalists and his decision to remake some sections of the paper.

His stint at the Los Angeles Times was also distinguished by 13 Pulitzer Prizes that the paper won under his supervision. Read more

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A report card on New York Times innovation report one year later

Digiday

It’s the end of the school year so maybe it’s fitting that The New York Times is receiving at least one report card.

Digiday offers one on five aspects related to the newspaper’s much-chronicled innovation report of last year.

The report was generally commended as a candid self-examination on a variety of topics, including culture and digital talent. Digiday offers its own progress report in these areas:

Traffic. It gives the paper a B-plus, noting that multiplatform traffic (Web plus app) grew 28 percent to 59 million uniques in April, compared to a year ago (“not bad for a mature publication”). Desktop traffic was basically flat, it said, while mobile grew 52 percent to 35.8 million uniques.

But, in what is a recurring newspaper industry story, challenges remain in monetizing the growth as subscription increases flatten. Read more

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The New York Times gets its own ‘Big Board’

The New York Times Tuesday debuted Trending, a single page that breaks down the paper’s most popular stories at any given moment:

Screenshot. (www.nytimes.com/trending)

Screenshot. (www.nytimes.com/trending)

The feature — which is still in the experimental phase — subverts conventional news rankings by emphasizing stories that readers are interested in rather than stories that editors deem worthy of homepage treatment. From a release announcing “Trending”‘s launch:

The dashboard serves as a new discovery path for Times stories: while the Times homepage presents the most important news of the day, Trending reflects what resonates and excites readers and drives them to discuss and share.

In that sense, it’s reminiscent of Gawker Media’s infamous “Big Board,” — which has since been supplanted by a leaderboard —  the place where staffers could monitor stories gaining the most traction with the company’s audiences. Read more

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NYT standards editor: ‘We should be pushing back’ on backgrounders

The New York Times

As 2016 election coverage ramps up, political reporters are sure to be assailed by requests for “backgrounders,” interviews or information from sources that cannot be identified by name.

But reporters at The New York Times should resist these unattributable tidbits when they come along, according to that paper’s standards editor. Margaret Sullivan, the public editor of the Times, quoted associate managing editor for standards Philip B. Corbett as saying the paper should do more to combat the practice:

The simple answer: yes. We should be pushing back more. Not just political reporters and editors, but Washington reporters, Albany and City Hall, business reporters, all of us. I think most of us agree with that in principle, but it can be harder than you think in the crush of daily coverage, deadlines, competitive pressure and the need to develop useful sources.

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NYT has implemented every suggestion in the innovation report, chairman says

The recommendations listed in last year’s New York Times innovation report — an extensive look at the outlet’s digital successes and shortcomings — have all been implemented, company chairman Arthur O. Sulzberger, Jr. announced Tuesday.

The news came during during a morning session of the World News Media Congress held at The Washington Hilton in Washington, D.C., where media leaders from around the world convened to discuss the frontiers, practices and trends in media.

According to tweets from those attending the session, Sulzberger made several updates about the state of The New York Times. Among them:

  • Sulzberger says the recommendations made in the innovation report were “modest” and “all have been implemented in less than a year,” according to media blogger and CUNY professor Jeff Jarvis.
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The New York Times now has ads from the ’20s on ‘Madison’

Screen shot, Madison

Screen shot, Madison

On Monday, The New York Times R&D Lab added a new decade to its online crowdsourcing ad archives project — the 1920s.

There’s also now a gallery to see the advertisements that have already been ID’d, tagged and/or transcribed in “Madison,” Abbe Serphos, executive director of corporate communications at The New York Times, said via email. “You can also now download data in JSON format that will contain all metadata collected so far.”

Here’s how the Times R&D Lab explains what it’s building with “Madison”, which launched last October with ads from the ’60s:

The New York Times’s century-and-a-half news archive is a rich and under-utilized resource, not only for news events but also as a reflection of cultural history. While news events and reporting give us a glimpse of one aspect of our past, the advertisements that ran alongside those news articles allow us a very different view.

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Paul Krugman didn’t know he was on Twitter until he had more than a half-million followers

The New York Times

Most journalists must toil away in 140-character dispatches for years before they manage to accrue a hefty Twitter following. Not so for New York Times columnist Paul Krugman, who had 600,000 followers before he realized his Twitter feed was extant. Here’s an excerpt from an item published early this morning titled “Blogging Begins.”

A proper blog came much later, when I realized that I wanted a place to put the backstory behind my Times columns; the Times added a Twitter feed (which I didn’t even know existed until Andy Rosenthal casually mentioned that I had 600,000 followers). And so here we are today.

Krugman now has more than a million followers on Twitter.

(h/t Ezra Klein) Read more

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