Articles about "News Corp."


Journalists hit with tear gas, other stuff, while covering Ferguson decision

Good morning. Here are nine media stories.

  1. How news outlets covered Ferguson decision

    The news media's demand for information was the "most significant challenge encountered in this investigation," St. Louis County prosecution Robert P. McCulloch said Monday while announcing a grand jury's decision not to indict Ferguson, Missouri, Police Officer Darren Wilson in the shooting death of Michael Brown. (Poynter) | Al Tompkins dug into the grand jury report. (Storify) | Some highlights from the testimony. (AP) | I watched CNN last night and saw reporters get hit with smoke and/or tear gas (St. Louis County Police said they used both, smoke first). | CNN's Don Lemon and Chris Cuomo got hit by tear gas. (Mediaite) | Protesters grabbed and broke a Fox News camera. (Gawker) | CNN's Stephanie Elam said a man looting a cell-phone store threatened her.

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Fox News crushed competitors on election night

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Fox News beat broadcast networks on election night

    It also crushed in 2010, the last Republican wave. (NYT) | "Fox News is normally the dominant player in cable news, but its high ratings on Tuesday may have been partly influenced by the nature of the 2014 electorate." (Politico) | Related: "Think of the GOP’s Senate takeover as a full-employment act for Washington reporters," Jack Shafer writes. (Reuters)

  2. Earnings season update

    News Corp saw overall revenues rise, but ad revenue at its print newspapers fell 7 percent over the same period the year before. Strong results at its book division (including recently acquired Harlequin) and other businesses drove an overall growth in revenue at the spun-off company. (Capital) | Torstar, which sold Harlequin to News Corp, saw a 7 percent drop in revenue over all.

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Star Tribune runs ad bashing transgender kids

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. News Corp buys online real estate business: Move, Inc., owns Realtor.com, Move.com and ListHub. News Corp will “turbo-charge traffic growth” to Move’s properties, and it will “benefit from the high-quality geographic data generated by real estate searches,” CEO Robert Thomson says. (BusinessWire) | Last year Move “reported $600,000 in profit atop $227 million in revenue.” (NYT)
  2. Minneapolis Star Tribune ran an ad bashing transgender kids: The Minnesota Child Protection League ran a full-page ad Sunday in an attempt to influence the Minnesota State High School League, which may “approve a new policy that would allow transgender students to participate in athletics based on their gender identity.” Strib VP Steve Yaeger tells Aaron Rupar: “The ad in question met all the requirements of our ad policy.” (Minneapolis City Pages) | Earlier this year the Strib took some heat for how it reported on a transgender person.
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News Corp’s revenue falls

News Corp

Revenue at News Corp’s news and information division fell 6 percent in the last quarter of the corporation’s fiscal year, and 9 percent in the full year, when compared with the respective same periods the year before.

“The majority of the revenue decline reflects lower advertising revenues at the News and Information Services segment, the sale of LMG and foreign currency fluctuations, partially offset by strong performance in the Book Publishing and Digital Real Estate Services segments,” the company says in an earnings release. “LMG” refers to Dow Jones’ Local Media Group, which the company sold last September.

Overall revenue was down 3 percent in the fourth quarter and 4 percent for the year. Circulation and subscription revenues were down 5 percent in the year, the report says. Advertising revenue in the news division, which includes Dow Jones, The Wall Street Journal and the New York Post, was down 10 percent in the year. Read more

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New York Times Slim

NYT acknowledges Carol Vogel lifted from Wikipedia

mediawiremorningGood morning. 10-ish, anyone?

  1. NYT acknowledges Carol Vogel lifted from Wikipedia: Part of a July 25 column “used specific language and details from a Wikipedia article without attribution; it should not have been published in that form,” a grisly editor’s note reads. (NYT) | Times spokesperson Eileen Murphy told Ravi Somaiya “editors have dealt with Carol on the issue.” (NYT) | “It seems to me that there can be little dispute about the claim,” Times Public Editor Margaret Sullivan wrote Wednesday. “Anyone can see the similarity.” (NYT)
  2. E.W. Scripps Co. and Journal Communications will combine broadcast properties, spin off newspapers: The companies “are so similar and share the deep commitment to public service through enterprise journalism,” Scripps Chairman Richard A. Boehne says. Among the newspapers in the new company, named Journal Media Group: The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel and The (Memphis, Tennessee) Commercial Appeal (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel) | “The complicated transaction is the latest move by media companies to focus on either television or print operations, with nearly all choosing to leave behind the slower-growing print business.” (NYT) | Al Tompkins: Scripps “is well positioned to cash in on mid-term political spending with stations in hotly contested political grounds of Ohio and Florida.” (Poynter) | “This deal looks much better for print spinoff than the Tribune deal.
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Polk Awards

Did the government throw shade on latest Greenwald scoop?

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories. Also, from Sam Kirkland, your digital morning stuff, and from Kristen Hare, a look at journalism outside the U.S.

  1. Did the government try to stink up Glenn Greenwald’s latest story? The American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee’s national president, Samer Khalaf, says “It wasn’t that they were saying it was false. They were saying they can’t respond to a story that wasn’t out yet.” (The Washington Post) | The Intercept “began hearing about Justice Department officials attempting to discredit our story long before that [ADC] meeting took place.” (The Intercept) | Related: Bart Gellman answers objections to his latest NSA story, which he wrote with Julie Tate and Ashkan Soltani. (The Washington Post)
  2. Remembering John Seigenthaler, who died Friday: The Tennessean’s package | Former Poynter President Karen Dunlap remembers Seigenthaler. (Poynter) | Poynter will have some more Seigenthaler stuff today.
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Rupert Murdoch

News Corp. rumored to be putting together a new bid for Tribune newspapers

Rumor has it that News Corp — with a $2.5 billion cash kitty for acquisitions — may be mounting a new bid for the Los Angeles Times, the Chicago Tribune and the six other Tribune newspapers.

Rupert Murdoch and his company were first reported interested in the acquisition (in a story in the L.A. Times and elsewhere) when the papers were being shopped in late 2012 and early 2013.

No deal was struck, and last July Tribune announced that it would instead spin off the papers into a new publicly-traded company, Tribune Publishing. Tribune Publishing has recently hired a CEO and other staff, and the split is now scheduled to happen as soon as Aug. 4, but at least within the next several months.

I would not typically report a publishing rumor. This one could prove dead wrong. But a confidential tip that started this inquiry was more substantive than gossip on the street.  Read more

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Google protesters arrested; what @SavedYouAClick won’t do

mediawiremorning Good morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Net neutrality protesters reportedly arrested at Google HQ: Valleywag’s Nitasha Tiku and TechCrunch’s Natasha Lomas report that members of a group called Occupy Google were arrested outside Google’s Mountain View, California, headquarters early this morning. (Valleywag; TechCrunch)
  2. Source spot: New York Times Public Editor Margaret Sullivan draws a line between “serious and valid use of confidentiality” and anonymity granted for sources relaying “what is often, in essence, officially approved government communication, or for promoting their own political agenda.” (NYT)
  3. Phone-hacking stories you might actually want to read: The criminal case against several former News Corp employees “is not the final word on whether either editor, News Corp., or much of the British tabloid press has betrayed the principles of journalism,” Ken Auletta writes. “Ethical failures may not merit a jail term; they do merit a spotlight.” (The New Yorker) || A superb explainer about the trial by Patrick Smith and Alan White.
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News Corp calls Daily Mail Australia ‘copy snatchers and parasites’

Today’s MediaWireWorld roundup of journalism news from outside the U.S. Send tips to Kristen Hare: khare@poynter.org

Australia

News Corp Australia called reporters with Daily Mail Australia “copy snatchers and parasites,” Amanda Meade reported Monday in The Guardian. Meade reported that News Corp sent a letter to the recently rebranded organization (formerly known just as Mail Online) threatening a lawsuit if it doesn’t stop lifting copy.

One of the exclusive stories News has accused the Daily Mail of copying is a feature about “the best dress a woman can own”, which reportedly took six Daily Telegraph journalists, including a fashion editor with 20 years’ experience, to produce.

Daily Mail Australia sources called the whole thing “ludicrous.” Since it launched, Meade reported, the new site has 2.18 million unique visits a month “and it now ranks sixth in Australian news websites, according to Nielsen.” Read more

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News Corp Split

PoynterVision: Why News Corp acquired Storyful

Raju Narisetti, senior vice president and deputy head of strategy at News Corp, explains the reasons behind News Corp’s $25 million acquisition of Storyful in December. Many newsrooms have adopted Storyful to help them verify social media and video content. Watch the video to hear how Narisetti, who came to Poynter for the Future of News Audiences conference Jan. 26-27, sees Storyful’s verification tools fit into News Corp’s larger strategy.


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