Articles about "News of the World phone hacking"


Diana leaked royal phone directory, journalist testifies in phone hacking trial

Agence France-PresseAssociated Press

A British journalist on trial in connection with the long-running phone hacking scandal claimed Thursday that Princess Diana gave him a royal phone directory, the Agence France-Presse and Associated Press reported. Read more

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Times of London cartoonist Peter Brookes illustrated Twitter response to the report.

Response to Leveson report fills UK front pages

Kiosko.net | Mediagazer
Sixteen months in the making, the report and recommendations from Lord Leveson’s inquiry into the British press released Thursday were met with resistance from England’s Prime Minister and rejected by many media watchers. Front pages from the U.K. capture the reaction, along with this cartoon.

Times of London cartoonist Peter Brookes illustrated Twitter response to the report.
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Rebekah Brooks, former News International chief executive leaves Westminster Magistrates Court in London, where she appeared to face charges linked to alleged bribery of public officials,Thursday, Nov. 29, 2012. Britain's rambunctious press braced Thursday for censure and tougher scrutiny as an ethics inquiry triggered by tabloid phone hacking released its wide-ranging report. Lord Justice Brian Leveson was due to release the findings of his yearlong inquiry, which heard evidence from hundreds of journalists, politicians, lawyers and victims of press intrusion. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)

What you need to know about the just-published Leveson report on phone hacking, press regulation

The report of Lord Justice Brian Leveson‘s 16-month-long inquiry into “the culture, practices and ethics” of the British press was released Thursday. Here’s the report and the summary.

The report proposes “independent regulation of the press organized by the press itself,” Leveson said while introducing the report this morning.

In the report, Leveson recommends “An independent self regulatory body…governed by an independent Board.” The board would “not include any serving editor” and “not include any serving member of the House of Commons or any member of the Government,” the report says. The board must write a standards code and “require all those who subscribe to have an adequate and speedy complaint handling mechanism.” The board “should not have the power to prevent publication of any material, by anyone, at any time” and “should have the power to impose appropriate and proportionate sanctions, (including financial sanctions up to 1% of turnover with a maximum of £1m), on any subscriber found to be responsible for serious or systemic breaches of the standards code or governance requirements of the body.”

Here’s what else you need to know about it: Read more

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Rebekah Brooks formally charged in Milly Dowler phone-hacking

BNONews | ITV News | Guardian
Scotland Yard has announced formal charges against former News International head Rebekah Brooks, among other editors and reporters, for the phone hacking of Milly Dowler and others. According to the Guardian, “The seven stand accused of one general charge of alleged phone hacking between October 2000 and August 2006 that could affect as many as 600 victims.”

Also charged: former News of the World editor Andy Coulson, former reporter Neville Thurlbeck, plus other editors and another reporter.

The so-called “phone hacking” scandal was ignited last year by the revelation that people working for News of the World had listened to Dowler’s voice mails when she was missing in 2002. But it turned out that they may not have deleted the voice mails that gave her parents hope that she was still alive, as initially reported by the Guardian.

Brooks was arrested last year, shortly after she resigned as head of News International.

Earlier: Murdoch deputy Rebekah Brooks takes the stand at U.K.’s Leveson inquiry Read more

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British Parliament report: Rupert Murdoch ‘not a fit person’ to run News Corp.

Parliamentary report | News Corp. response | The Guardian | CNN | PressGazette
Rupert Murdoch showed “willful blindness” to the problem of phone hacking within his company, says a report from Britain’s Parliament that was released today. It called him “not a fit person” to run his massive news empire. The full report is here, and the Guardian is live-blogging the reverberations. The PressGazette in the U.K. is reporting key findings, including:

• Former Dow Jones CEO Les Hinton “misled the committee in 2009 in not telling the truth about payments” to Clive Goodman, a News of the World reporter who was imprisoned for phone-hacking but paid a large sum by News International on his release.

• Both former News Corp. legal honcho Tom Crone and former News of the World editor Colin Myler (who is now editor of the New York Daily News) “misled the Committee by answering questions falsely about their knowledge of evidence that other News of the World employees had been involved in phone-hacking and other wrongdoing.” Read more

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Rupert Murdoch on closing News of the World: ‘I panicked’

The second day of Rupert Murdoch’s testimony before Britain’s Leveson inquiry into press ethics has been far more grabby than on Wednesday, when, as Michael Wolff put it, Murdoch “gave nothing….He was the ordinary and down-to-earth guy, whereas his Leveson inquiry antagonists were just this side of wild conspiracists. He was Hyman Roth in the Godfather: just ‘a retired investor living on a pension.’” Read more

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James Murdoch testifies: ‘The way companies do business is important’

The Guardian | The New York Times | The Leveson Inquiry
James Murdoch’s six-hour testimony today before the British parliament’s Leveson inquiry is a gripping microdrama. Attorney Robert Jay, who is questioning Murdoch, flops himself over a lectern and delivers each question as if it had just occurred to him, raising his eyebrows at the end of most inquiries as if to encourage Murdoch to come clean. Jay is lightly bearded, wears ridiculous eyeglasses and looks rumpled. Murdoch replies in a middle-of-the-Atlantic accent — American flat vowels with British inflections. He’s in a sharp, well-fitting suit and so far appears unflapped by Jay’s surgical questioning. So far, high points have included: Read more

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Sky News: Email hacking was ‘editorially justified and in the public interest’

Guardian
The Guardian’s Dan Sabbagh, Nick Davies and Robert Booth report that in 2008 Sky News Managing Editor Simon Cole authorized a reporter to hack into the email account of a woman charged with a crime for helping her husband fake his death. (He’s been called “canoe man” because he had been paddling out to sea when he supposedly disappeared in 2002.) The reporter, Gerard Tubb, collected emails that would poke holes in the woman’s defense and handed them over to police to aid in her prosecution. Tubb made “only a minimal effort to hide the basis of the story” that he reported using the emails, the Guardian reports. He also was authorized to hack into email in another case, although Sky News didn’t publish any stories related to that one.

The Guardian notes that such activity is illegal, but BSkyB’s Sky News is defending it:

We stand by these actions as editorially justified and in the public interest. We do not take such decisions lightly or frequently. They require finely balanced judgement based on individual circumstances and must always be subjected to the proper editorial controls. In a separate investigation, a Sky News journalist bought an Uzi machine gun in 2004 to highlight the easy availability of illegal weapons in the UK.

Earlier: James Murdoch steps down as BSkyB chairman to avoid being ‘lightning rod’ (Poynter) Read more

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James Murdoch steps down as BSkyB chairman to avoid being ‘lightning rod’

Guardian
BSkyB quotes James Murdoch in its announcement that he is stepping down as chairman of the company:

“As attention continues to be paid to past events at News International, I am determined that the interests of BSkyB should not be undermined by matters outside the scope of this company.” He added: “I am aware that my role as chairman could become a lightning rod for BSkyB and I believe that my resignation will help to ensure that there is no false conflation with events at a separate organisation.”

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