Articles about "News of the World phone hacking"


Tools:
0 Comments

James Murdoch resignation revives News Corp. succession parlor game

James Murdoch’s resignation as head of News Corp.’s British publishing unit marks the end of his time as Rupert Murdoch’s heir apparent and opens the door for further speculation about who will succeed Rupert Murdoch as head of the company.

It remains to be seen whether Rupert Murdoch will be able to install one of James’ siblings in his place, or whether, as Ken Auletta wrote in December, “it’s almost a certainty that Rupert Murdoch’s dream of keeping News Corp. a family-run enterprise is dead.” Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

News Corp. stock trades higher after Murdoch announcement

After investors learned this morning that James Murdoch was stepping down as leader of the News International division, shares of the corporate parent rose. Shares of British Sky Broadcasting traded down sharply today on the London Stock Exchange. News Corp. owns a significant stake in BSkyB, and James Murdoch is the chairman and non-executive director. German broadcaster Sky Deutschland, which is also partly owned by News Corp., traded slightly higher. Read more

Tools:
0 Comments
murdochs

James Murdoch steps down as head of News International

After months of controversy as News International has been investigated for the phone hacking scandal that closed its “News of the World” tabloid, James Murdoch is stepping down as leader of the company, which publishes News Corp.’s UK newspapers. He will remain as deputy COO of News Corp., a position he’s held for just under a year. Tom Mockridge will remain as CEO of News International. Mockridge replaced Rebekah Brooks last July, when she was forced to resign for her role in the scandal. In the release about his resignation, Murdoch says, “With the successful launch of The Sun on Sunday and new business practices in place across all titles, News International is now in a strong position to build on its successes in the future.” Rupert Murdoch’s statement says his son “will continue to assume a variety of essential corporate leadership mandates, with particular focus on important pay-TV businesses and broader international operations.” James Murdoch is based in New York now, a move that was planned prior to the phone hacking scandal and delayed by it. The move was originally viewed as part of a family succession plan. || Related: News Corp. stock rises after announcement of James Murdoch’s departure from News International | News Corp. executives weighed spinoff of newspaper publishing, Carey says (Bloomberg) Read more

Tools:
1 Comment

Morning media roundup: How to borrow a horse from Scotland Yard

WHY THE LONG FACE? Just when you thought the News Corp. phone hacking story couldn’t get any stranger, it came out Tuesday that Scotland Yard loaned a horse to former News of the World editor Rebekah Brooks. Raisa, a 22-year-old retired police horse, went to live with Brooks post-retirement. “Scotland Yard,” writes John F. Burns, “issued a statement on Tuesday describing the horse loan as routine.”

>> Now that a day has passed, British papers not owned by Rupert Murdoch are not giving up on the story of a powerful editor borrowing a horse from a police force her paper covers. The Telegraph quotes a police spokesperson: “When the horse was returned Raisa was regarded by officers from Mounted Branch to be in a poor but not serious condition.” The Independent explains how the horse came to be transferred from “a retirement paddock in Norfolk” to Brooks’ farm in Chipping Norton, where, a propos of nothing but at this point you never know, Brooks is neighbors with “Top Gear” host Jeremy Clarkson.

>> Murdoch, on Twitter: “Now they are complaining about R Brooks saving an old horse from the glue factory!” Yep, Twitter had fun with that one. Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

The Sun on Sunday: We smuggled in two copies!

News Corp.’s new British tabloid, The Sun on Sunday, launched yesterday, and since my wife was traveling home from Edinburgh last night, I asked her to bring me a copy. She bought the Scottish and English editions. “So embarrassed!” she texted from Heathrow.

They’re both, in the tradition of British tabs, a lot of trashy fun. “My heart stopped for 40 seconds,” declares the headline for a story about actress Amanda Holden’s harrowing C-section.

Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

Murdoch’s Times of London is being investigated for hacking

Tom Watson | The New York Times | Reuters
The ethics scandal that closed UK tabloid News of the World has spread not only to The Sun, another Murdoch-owned News International paper, but to The Times of London. Tom Watson, a member of Parliament (MP) in the Labour Party, posted a letter from London police confirming that his inquiries into email hacking at the Sun are being investigated. “The case apparently was related to an episode in 2009 when a reporter who has since left The Times of London exposed the identity of a police officer who blogged under the pseudonym Nightjack, according to British news reports,” reports The New York Times. It will take at least another year and a half for News Corp.’s Management and Standards Committee to complete its own investigation into unethical journalism practices. Reuters says as many as 100 lawyers and computer experts are reviewing 300 million emails and other documents in a soundproof area. || Related: Phone hacking victims say News Corp. has admitted coverup (Poynter) Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

A former News of the World editor explains why he continued to use someone as a source after police deemed him an unreliable witness:

“Most of the people I deal with would be regarded as unreliable witnesses. I’ve had front page splashes from crack addicts.”

Former News of the World investigations editor Mazher Mahmood

Tools:
0 Comments

“On 10 April last year in an article headlined ‘Royals believe Eugenie and Beatrice targeted’ we reported suspicions held by Prince Andrew that his daughters’ phones may have been hacked. Our article implied that hacking may have been carried out by The Sun newspaper. The Sun has asked us to point out that there is no evidence whatsoever any such hacking was carried out by the title or on behalf of the title. We are happy to make the position clear.”

A correction in The Independent

Tools:
0 Comments

Phone hacking victims say News Corp. has admitted coverup

Reuters | Guardian
In announcing a number of settlements with the British newspaper unit of News Corp. on Thursday, lawyers for phone hacking victims said senior employees and directors of News Group Newspapers “knew about the wrongdoing and sought to conceal it by deliberately deceiving investigators and destroying evidence.” The lawyers said the company has turned over documents that show a coverup and the destruction of email and evidence. The statement doesn’t name James Murdoch, notes the Guardian’s David Leigh, but he was chairman of the board for News Group Newspapers. The Guardian’s tally of the settlements: £645,000 (nearly $1 million) in damages to 15 victims of phone hacking, and additional “substantial” payments for three more cases, plus legal fees. || Related: Prior coverage of the News of the World phone hacking scandal Read more

Tools:
0 Comments