Articles about "Newsweek"


Career Beat: Newsday makes 2 executive appointments

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community.

  • Paul Likins is now vice president of digital operations at Newsday Media Group. Previously, he was head of revenue operations and programmatic solutions for Wenner Media. Stefanie Angeli is now senior director of national sales at Newsday Media Group. She previously led sales at Mom365.com. (Email)
  • Gregg Birnbaum is now managing editor, head of political content at New York Daily News. He is a deputy managing editor at Politico. (Email)
  • Matt Cooper is now politics editor at Newsweek. He has covered the White House for Time, The New Republic and U.S. News and World Report. Ross Schneiderman is now a senior editor at Newsweek. He has contributed to The Wall Street Journal and The New York Times. Jonathan Broder is now a senior writer at Newsweek. Previously, he was the defense and foreign policy editor at Congressional Quarterly. Winston Ross is now a national correspondent for Newsweek.
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Fox News crushed competitors on election night

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Fox News beat broadcast networks on election night

    It also crushed in 2010, the last Republican wave. (NYT) | "Fox News is normally the dominant player in cable news, but its high ratings on Tuesday may have been partly influenced by the nature of the 2014 electorate." (Politico) | Related: "Think of the GOP’s Senate takeover as a full-employment act for Washington reporters," Jack Shafer writes. (Reuters)

  2. Earnings season update

    News Corp saw overall revenues rise, but ad revenue at its print newspapers fell 7 percent over the same period the year before. Strong results at its book division (including recently acquired Harlequin) and other businesses drove an overall growth in revenue at the spun-off company. (Capital) | Torstar, which sold Harlequin to News Corp, saw a 7 percent drop in revenue over all.

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bitcoinfeatured

Dorian Nakamoto looks to sue Newsweek over Bitcoin story

mediawiremorningHey, hi. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Lawsuit over Newsweek’s Bitcoin story? The man who Newsweek’s Leah McGrath Goodman identified as the founder of Bitcoin is raising money on a website to sue the magazine, claiming he was “targeted and victimized by a reckless news organization.” Dorian Nakamoto has been unemployed for 10 years, the site says. “Donations, obviously, can be made by bitcoin.” (TechCrunch) | Previously: In March, Nakamoto told the AP he hadn’t heard of Bitcoin until his son told him about it after talking to Newsweek: “I got nothing to do with it.” (Poynter)
  2. Snyderman sorry for violating Ebola quarantine: The 21-day quarantine for NBC News crew members who traveled to Liberia is now mandatory after Dr. Nancy Snyderman violated the voluntary quarantine. “As a health professional I know that we have no symptoms and pose no risk to the public, but I am deeply sorry for the concerns this episode caused.” (THR) | The freelance cameraman who contracted Ebola and is recovering, Ashoka Mukpo, tweeted his “endless gratitude for the good vibes.” (NBC News) | Ebola-related: The New York Post fronts the Dallas nurse who contracted Ebola — and her dog.
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Newsweek boss: ‘clearly enough’ examples to put editor’s note on Zakaria archive

On Monday Newsweek placed an editor’s note on Fareed Zakaria’s entire archive for the magazine. It says, “some of his articles have been the subject of complaints claiming that they contain material that should have been attributed to others.”

The anonymous critics @blippoblappo and @crushingbort published a post Aug. 22 outlining what they said were instances of plagiarism in Zakaria’s 2008 book “The Post-American World” and in Newsweek and Foreign Affairs.

Reached by phone, Newsweek Editor-in-Chief Jim Impoco said simply, “The examples I saw were clearly enough for me to append a note.”

Impoco also took issue with the now-kind-of-bruited claim that he hadn’t answered a previous request for comment from Poynter about Zakaria articles that Newsweek published before he was editor and when a different company owned the magazine.

On Aug. 22, I contacted Foreign Affairs and W.W. Norton, which published “The Post-American World.” My coworker Ben Mullin emailed The Atlantic, where Zakaria was recently named a contributing editor, and Kate Gardiner, IBT’s director of social media and audience engagement, to ask if she’d pass on a message to Impoco that Poynter wanted comment. Read more

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Star Tribune runs ad bashing transgender kids

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. News Corp buys online real estate business: Move, Inc., owns Realtor.com, Move.com and ListHub. News Corp will “turbo-charge traffic growth” to Move’s properties, and it will “benefit from the high-quality geographic data generated by real estate searches,” CEO Robert Thomson says. (BusinessWire) | Last year Move “reported $600,000 in profit atop $227 million in revenue.” (NYT)
  2. Minneapolis Star Tribune ran an ad bashing transgender kids: The Minnesota Child Protection League ran a full-page ad Sunday in an attempt to influence the Minnesota State High School League, which may “approve a new policy that would allow transgender students to participate in athletics based on their gender identity.” Strib VP Steve Yaeger tells Aaron Rupar: “The ad in question met all the requirements of our ad policy.” (Minneapolis City Pages) | Earlier this year the Strib took some heat for how it reported on a transgender person.
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Spin loses another editor-in-chief

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Craig Marks is no longer EIC of Spin: Marks tells Poynter via email he’s out. He was the publication’s fourth editor in two years. Stephen Blackwell, SpinMedia’s fourth CEO in the same amount of time, told me Monday that he had “high hopes” for the publication, and that it would add more editing talent soon. (Poynter) | A quick phone call with Marks: “It was a mutual and amicable decision that I would leave,” he said. “With the new CEO and the new regime it felt like the right time to part ways. I would like to pursue other interests including trying to finally get a bead on my next book.” Marks, who was executive editor at the magazine in the ’90s (I worked with him then for a spell then, in my first media job), took the job in June and says the split was not performance-related.
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Police Shooting Missouri

Where to buy gas masks for your reporting staff in Ferguson

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Who got arrested in Ferguson last night? Getty Images photographer Scott Olson. (Poynter) | Intercept reporter Ryan Devereaux (The Intercept) | Devereaux “was shot with rubber bullets/beanbags by police last night, spent night in jail. Is due to be released w/o charge soon.” (@the_intercept) | German reporters Ansgar Graw and Frank Hermann. (The Local) | “On Monday, The Washington Post, following the lead of other news organizations, began outfitting its employees with gas masks, purchased at a chain hardware store.” (WP) | Amazon has a pretty good selection of gas masks, some of which are eligible for Prime.
  2. St. Louis Post-Dispatch front page: “Streets Flare Up,” with stunning photo by David Carson (via Newseum) | Carson talked with Kristen Hare last week about covering the unrest in Ferguson.
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Luke O’Brien writes about Sidney Harman’s family’s decision to stop investing in Newsweek after he died. It’s but one can’t-miss moment in O’Brien’s story about Tina Brown’s reign at the magazine:

When I asked [former U.S. Rep. and Sidney's widow] Jane Harman recently if the content of the magazine had anything to do with the Harman family’s decision, Harman replied, “Tina had editorial control.” When asked if tasteless covers had anything to do with the Harman family decision, Harman replied again, “Tina had editorial control.” When asked if Jane Harman, personally, has any opinion at all about covers like crazy-eyes Bachmann or zombie Diana, Harman replied a third time, a bit more adamantly, “Tina had editorial control!”

Luke O'Brien, Politico Magazine

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Sacha Lecca, who is Rolling Stone’s deputy photography editor, tells Jim Colton about his early days at Newsweek:

Last but not least, I remember when Newsweek contract photographer Peter Turnley was covering an international crisis (I forget which) and in the middle of the night I got a call from the lobby that Peter Jennings (Anchorman for ABC Network News) was there to see me. I went downstairs and Jennings handed me a Newsweek film envelope and said, “Someone asked me to pass this along.” Turnley, while having trouble finding a flight to ship film back, spotted Jennings about to get on a US military transport to eventually make it home, and asked him to deliver it. His first stop after arriving in New York was to us. I always thought that was so cool. It was the way things got done back then.

Jim Colton, NPPA

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Dorian Nakamoto: ‘I’ll keep my bitcoin account’

In a video filmed alongside Andreas M. Antonopoulos, who is writing a book about bitcoin, Dorian Satoshi Nakamoto again says he’s not Satoshi Nakamoto, bitcoin’s founder. Newsweek last month said he was.

“Of course if I was the real creator I would never use my real name,” Nakamoto says. He says he received a bitcoin account from Antonopoulos and is “very thankful for you, all these people in U.S., Europe, in Asia, in Africa, in South America who supported me throughout.” He says 2,000 people donated. “I’ll keep my bitcoin account for many, many years, and hopefully I can also contribute as you did to me,” Nakamoto says.

Last month, Nakamoto said he’d hired a lawyer and that his “prospects for gainful employment has been harmed because of Newsweek’s article.” Newsweek issued a statement March 7 saying it stands by its story. Read more

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