Articles about "Newsweek"


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Dorian Nakamoto looks to sue Newsweek over Bitcoin story

mediawiremorningHey, hi. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Lawsuit over Newsweek’s Bitcoin story? The man who Newsweek’s Leah McGrath Goodman identified as the founder of Bitcoin is raising money on a website to sue the magazine, claiming he was “targeted and victimized by a reckless news organization.” Dorian Nakamoto has been unemployed for 10 years, the site says. “Donations, obviously, can be made by bitcoin.” (TechCrunch) | Previously: In March, Nakamoto told the AP he hadn’t heard of Bitcoin until his son told him about it after talking to Newsweek: “I got nothing to do with it.” (Poynter)
  2. Snyderman sorry for violating Ebola quarantine: The 21-day quarantine for NBC News crew members who traveled to Liberia is now mandatory after Dr. Nancy Snyderman violated the voluntary quarantine. “As a health professional I know that we have no symptoms and pose no risk to the public, but I am deeply sorry for the concerns this episode caused.” (THR) | The freelance cameraman who contracted Ebola and is recovering, Ashoka Mukpo, tweeted his “endless gratitude for the good vibes.” (NBC News) | Ebola-related: The New York Post fronts the Dallas nurse who contracted Ebola — and her dog. (New York Post) | Bentley “is being held in isolation and watched closely, but it is unlikely that he will have to be euthanized, Dallas city officials said.” (Mashable)
     


     

  3. Christie and Clinton overkill? Since Jan. 1, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie was been the most-mentioned potential Republican presidential contender, according to a LexisNexis search of 15 top newspapers, with Mitt Romney, Ted Cruz and Rand Paul not far behind. Hillary Clinton, of course, is the most-referenced Democrat — and it’s not close at all. “Overall, more stories have talked about potential GOP candidates (202) than Democratic ones (115).” (Pew Research Center)
  4. Kushner no longer OC Register’s publisher: New publisher and CEO Richard Mirman takes over for the beleaguered Aaron Kushner, who remains CEO of Freedom Communications, which owns the newspaper. Mirman is an investor in the Register. (Orange County Register) | Previously: The Los Angeles Register closed last month after just five months of operation (Poynter), and the Register reportedly owes the Los Angeles Times $3.5 million in distribution fees. (OC Weekly)
  5. Rift between Guardian and NYT? When The Guardian’s hard drives were being smashed by British authorities in 2013, the newspaper arranged for The New York Times to share and protect some of its Snowden documents. But now, Lloyd Grove reports, some Times editors are frustrated with The Guardian’s “total control over the Snowden cache, including how and when it can be used to develop, pursue and publish investigations.” Counters Times executive editor Dean Baquet: “I don’t feel held captive by The Guardian, because I wouldn’t have access to these particular documents without The Guardian.” (The Daily Beast)
  6. White House’s Secret Service spin: “White House reporters are often too swamped to fully check out every assertion made by the White House’s press operation, and in this case officials seized on a phrase that is in the report. The report is rather complicated and someone reading quickly might not catch the nuance that this was not actually a finding, but merely a claim made by, among others, by the very person whose credibility is questioned throughout the report.” (Washington Post)
  7. BBC looks at “hybrid” broadcast-Internet radio on phones: “Nearly two thirds of the mobile phone owners surveyed found the idea of hybrid radio appealing and said it could be a deciding factor when faced with a choice between phones with similar specs.” (BBC)
  8. Not front page of the day: A story on A1 of some editions of The New York Times today is missing a byline and lede.
     


     

  9. Front page of the day, curated by Kristen Hare: Times-Journal of Fort Payne, Alabama, with a very not-lifesize picture of Ebola (Courtesy the Newseum).
     
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  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Betsy Woodruff will be a politics writer for Slate. She’s currently a politics writer at the Washington Examiner. ‏(@woodruffbets) | Carlos Lozada will be a nonfiction book critic at The Washington Post. Previously, he edited Outlook there. (Washington Post) | Josef Federman is now Jerusalem bureau chief for The Associated Press. Previously, he was a news editor at the AP. (AP) | Chris Carter is now digital services sales director for The Alliance for Audited Media. Previously, he was director of business development for DG Interactive. (AAM) | Job of the day: The Associated Press is looking for a photo editor. Get your résumés in! (AP) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

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Newsweek boss: ‘clearly enough’ examples to put editor’s note on Zakaria archive

On Monday Newsweek placed an editor’s note on Fareed Zakaria’s entire archive for the magazine. It says, “some of his articles have been the subject of complaints claiming that they contain material that should have been attributed to others.”

The anonymous critics @blippoblappo and @crushingbort published a post Aug. 22 outlining what they said were instances of plagiarism in Zakaria’s 2008 book “The Post-American World” and in Newsweek and Foreign Affairs.

Reached by phone, Newsweek Editor-in-Chief Jim Impoco said simply, “The examples I saw were clearly enough for me to append a note.”

Impoco also took issue with the now-kind-of-bruited claim that he hadn’t answered a previous request for comment from Poynter about Zakaria articles that Newsweek published before he was editor and when a different company owned the magazine.

On Aug. 22, I contacted Foreign Affairs and W.W. Norton, which published “The Post-American World.” My coworker Ben Mullin emailed The Atlantic, where Zakaria was recently named a contributing editor, and Kate Gardiner, IBT’s director of social media and audience engagement, to ask if she’d pass on a message to Impoco that Poynter wanted comment. Gardiner confirms she forwarded him that message, but Impoco said he had expected to see a followup message from Poynter after that.

So just an update for those keeping score on this game of inside baseball: Newsweek and Poynter have now talked after Poynter first launched that star-crossed search for comment. No reply from Norton or Foreign Affairs yet. Poynter has been in touch with Atlantic Media, but it hasn’t yet offered any comment. Read more

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Star Tribune runs ad bashing transgender kids

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. News Corp buys online real estate business: Move, Inc., owns Realtor.com, Move.com and ListHub. News Corp will “turbo-charge traffic growth” to Move’s properties, and it will “benefit from the high-quality geographic data generated by real estate searches,” CEO Robert Thomson says. (BusinessWire) | Last year Move “reported $600,000 in profit atop $227 million in revenue.” (NYT)
  2. Minneapolis Star Tribune ran an ad bashing transgender kids: The Minnesota Child Protection League ran a full-page ad Sunday in an attempt to influence the Minnesota State High School League, which may “approve a new policy that would allow transgender students to participate in athletics based on their gender identity.” Strib VP Steve Yaeger tells Aaron Rupar: “The ad in question met all the requirements of our ad policy.” (Minneapolis City Pages) | Earlier this year the Strib took some heat for how it reported on a transgender person. (Minneapolis City Pages)
  3. Esquire botches attack on ESPN: There was no all-male domestic violence panel planned, ESPN said Monday. (Deadspin) | Esquire apologized for that and for “saying that ESPN is not in the business of journalism,” Hearst Digital editorial director Kate Lewis writes in a note on the piece. Esquire is owned by Hearst, which has a 20 percent stake in ESPN, Jeremy Barr reports. “A Hearst spokesperson did not respond directly to a Capital inquiry about whether the company’s investment in ESPN played a role in the apology.” (Capital) | Despite the apology, Esquire kept a sentence that said “ESPN is not a company in the business of journalism” in the story until later that evening. (WP) | Craig Silverman finds articles with the erroneous information were shared far more widely than articles that corrected it. (Emergent)
  4. Roxane Gay will edit cultural criticism site: The Toast has hired the bestselling author to head up a new site called The Butter. (Capital) | Not at all related but this was the only item I could wedge it into: Piers Morgan will write commentary for Daily Mail Online. (Politico)
  5. Newsweek places editor’s note over Zakaria archives: “Fareed Zakaria worked for Newsweek when it was under previous ownership,” the note, which also rides along on Zakaria’s archived articles, says. “Readers are advised that some of his articles have been the subject of complaints claiming that they contain material that should have been attributed to others.” (Poynter) | “New Fun Trawling Through Fareed Zakaria’s @Newsweek Archives, Part 1″ (@blippoblappo)
  6. Will Bill Simmons stay at ESPN? He “did not think that what he said or how he said it was worthy of one of the harshest suspensions in ESPN history,” John Ourand reported Friday in a tick-tock of how ESPN decided to put its star on ice. Simmons’ contract will be up next year, Ourand writes, and “it will be interesting to see whether this suspension derails those talks.” (SportsBusiness Daily) | The clash reflects a generational conflict at ESPN, Jason McIntyre reported Friday. “The old guard has its fingers crossed they can pester and annoy Simmons to the point that he pulls the trigger on a plan they claim he’s been mulling after spending so much time in Hollywood: decamp from ESPN to a venture capital-backed solo operation with contributions from his West Coast buddies Jimmy Kimmel and Adam Carolla.” (The Big Lead) | Erik Wemple: Suspensions “are effective primarily in forgetting and neglecting the root causes of the stupidity that materializes on air.” (WP)
  7. Chartbeat can now measure readers’ attention: The Media Ratings Council has approved Chartbeat’s bid to measure attention rather than pageviews or unique visitors. (Gigaom) | “If you’re dealing with something where you can prove attention better, you can charge more,” Chartbeat CEO Tony Haile tells Andrew Nusca. (Fortune) | Haile noted in February that there is “effectively no correlation between social shares and people actually reading.” (The Verge) | Rick Edmonds in March: “Time to ditch uniques and page views for engagement in measuring digital audiences” (Poynter)
  8. RIP Joe Nawrozki: The investigative reporter worked for three Baltimore newspapers, dug up political corruption among pols, and “taught martial arts for more than 40 years.” He died Saturday. He was 70. (The Baltimore Sun)
  9. Front page of the day, curated by Kristen Hare: Taiwan’s Apple Daily fronts the Hong Kong protests. (Courtesy Newseum)

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  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Ann Shoket will be a consultant for Hearst. Previously, she was editor-in-chief of Seventeen magazine. (Capital) | Kal Penn will be a special correspondent for Fusion. Previously, he was associate director of the White House’s Office of Public Engagement. (Politico) | Richard Tomko is now publisher of amNewYork. Previously, he was a consultant at Boost Digital. (Email) | Tony Brancato is now executive director of Web products and audience development at The New York Times. Previously, he was head of product for the Web there. (The New York Times) | Sandy Johnson is now president and chief operating officer at The National Press Foundation. Previously, she was the excecutive editor at Stateline.org. (National Press Foundation) | Jeff Simon will be a video producer at CNN. He’s a producer for The Washington Post. (@jjsimonWP) | Cynthia Littleton will be Variety’s managing editor for television. Previously, she was editor-in-chief of television. Claudia Eller and Andrew Wallenstein are now co-editors-in-chief at Variety. Eller was editor-in-chief of film at Variety. Wallenstein was editor-in-chief of digital there. (Variety) | Sonya Thompson will be director of news projects for Tribune Media Group. She was news director for WJW in Cleveland. Mitch Jacob will be news director at WJLA. He was news director for WSYX in Columbus. Jamie Justice will be news director at WSYX in Columbus. Previously, she was assistant news director there. Rob Cartwright is now news director for KEYE in Austin. Previously, he was news director for WSYR in Syracuse. Jeff Houston is now news director for WBMA in Birmingham. Previously, he was an assistant news director there. (Rick Gevers) | James VanOsdol has been named newsroom program manager at Rivet News Radio. He is an anchor at HearHere Radio LLC. (Robert Feder) | Job of the day: Politico is looking for a tax reporter. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

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Spin loses another editor-in-chief

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Craig Marks is no longer EIC of Spin: Marks tells Poynter via email he’s out. He was the publication’s fourth editor in two years. Stephen Blackwell, SpinMedia’s fourth CEO in the same amount of time, told me Monday that he had “high hopes” for the publication, and that it would add more editing talent soon. (Poynter) | A quick phone call with Marks: “It was a mutual and amicable decision that I would leave,” he said. “With the new CEO and the new regime it felt like the right time to part ways. I would like to pursue other interests including trying to finally get a bead on my next book.” Marks, who was executive editor at the magazine in the ’90s (I worked with him then for a spell then, in my first media job), took the job in June and says the split was not performance-related. I asked him whether he felt like his brief stay there — a summer job? — had been a waste of time. “No, not at all,” he said. “It was really great, even if it was brief, to be back at Spin and to help restore and revive a publication that meant a lot and means a lot to people, and I sincerely hope I helped lay the groundwork for Spin to be good and relevant and meaningful.”
  2. Somaly Mam says she didn’t lie: “This past May, Mam’s life imploded after a Newsweek report left the impression that she had fabricated her life story and had encouraged a girl in her care to lie that she had been trafficked,” Abigail Pesta writes. “While in Cambodia, I investigated the claims against Mam and spoke to people cited in the Newsweek piece, three of whom said their views were misrepresented. One of the three, identified in Newsweek as a woman, is, in fact, a man.” (Marie Claire)
  3. Mark Ruffalo visited The Boston Globe: The actor was researching his role as reporter Michael Rezendes in “Spotlight,” a film about the Globe’s reporting on the Catholic Church’s sex-abuse scandal. (The Boston Globe)
  4. “On this beat if you fuck up with the national office, you’re fucked”: Dave McKenna writes about the uneven power relationships between the league and its media “partners” that makes independent NFL coverage very difficult. (Deadspin) | Related: Advertisers, including Anheuser-Busch and McDonald’s, have said they’re not satisfied with the NFL’s response to child abuse and domestic violence charges against players. (ESPN)
  5. Influential LGBT people in media: NPR reporter Ari Shapiro (currently enduring the sound of bagpipes as he covers the Scots referendum), Janet Mock, Re/code’s Ina Fried and Capital’s Tom McGeveran make the top 50. (Advocate)
  6. New offices for Gawker publications: “For want of others seeking the role, we are the guardians of independent media,” Gawker Media honcho Nick Denton (No. 7 on the Advocate list) says in a memo to staffers, telling them they’ll soon be blogging from 114 Fifth Ave. (Re/code) | “The new office is just a few blocks from Gawker competitors Buzzfeed and Business Insider, and is in the same building as social news site Mashable and Pierre Omidyar’s First Look Media, which is where former Gawker editor John Cook currently works.” (Capital)
  7. Is it plagiarism? Ben Mullin made a handy flowchart for editors and media watchers. (Poynter)
  8. Journalist murdered in Afghanistan: Palwasha Tokhi Miranzai “was repeatedly stabbed by unidentified men inside her house in Mazar-e-Sharif city.” (Khaama Press)
  9. Front page of the day, selected by Kristen Hare: A scary waterspout on the front of the Pensacola News Journal. (Courtesy Newseum)

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  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Guy Vidra will become the new CEO of The New Republic. He is the general manager of Yahoo News. Owner Chris Hughes will remain as publisher but will no longer be editor-in-chief. (The New Republic) | Dana Liebelson will be a political reporter at HuffPost Politics. She’s a reporter for Mother Jones. (Email) | Ashley Codianni is now a senior producer and digital correspondent for CNN Politics Digital. She’s Mashable’s director of news video. (Fishbowl DC) | Cara Parks has been named executive editor at Modern Farmer. She was previously a freelancer and deputy managing editor at Foreign Policy. (Observer.com) | Suejin Yang has been named vice president and general manager of digital entertainment at People and Entertainment Weekly. Previously, she was vice president of Bravo Digital Media. (Fishbowl NY) | Job of the day: ProPublica is looking for a research editor. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

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Police Shooting Missouri

Where to buy gas masks for your reporting staff in Ferguson

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Who got arrested in Ferguson last night? Getty Images photographer Scott Olson. (Poynter) | Intercept reporter Ryan Devereaux (The Intercept) | Devereaux “was shot with rubber bullets/beanbags by police last night, spent night in jail. Is due to be released w/o charge soon.” (@the_intercept) | German reporters Ansgar Graw and Frank Hermann. (The Local) | “On Monday, The Washington Post, following the lead of other news organizations, began outfitting its employees with gas masks, purchased at a chain hardware store.” (WP) | Amazon has a pretty good selection of gas masks, some of which are eligible for Prime.
  2. St. Louis Post-Dispatch front page: “Streets Flare Up,” with stunning photo by David Carson (via Newseum) | Carson talked with Kristen Hare last week about covering the unrest in Ferguson. (Poynter) | Hare’s Twitter list of journalists covering Ferguson. (The list keeps changing! Let her know if someone’s missing/no longer there: khare@poynter.org.) | Interesting take: “I believe that publishing unedited images of Ferguson’s demonstrators engaged in possibly criminal behavior — including breaking curfew — is a breach of journalistic ethics.” (Al Jazeera America)
  3. R.I.P. Don Pardo: The NBC announcer and longtime voice of “Saturday Night Live” was 96. (LAT) | When Pardo joined NBC as a radio announcer in 1944, he “also played the role of engineer, getting the radio programs going and cuing up the right bits at the right time. If you could not do those chores, he said, you would not last as a radio announcer.” (NYT)
  4. Some NFL announcers won’t say Redskins’ name: Phil Simms (CBS) and Tony Dungy (NBC) say they won’t use it. “CBS is allowing its announcers to decide on their own whether to call the team the Redskins. So is Fox, which handles the NFC and will televise most of Washington’s games.” (AP) | My list of outlets and journalists who won’t use the term. (Poynter)
  5. Time Inc. rates employees based on how friendly their content is to advertisers: “Writers who may have high assessments for their writing ability, which is their job, were in fact terminated based on the fact the company believed their stories did not ‘produce content that is beneficial to advertiser relationships,’” Guild rep Anthony Napoli tells Hamilton Nolan. (Gawker) | “In a statement, Sports Illustrated said the guild’s interpretation was ‘misleading and takes one category out of context.’” (NYT)
  6. Newsweek builds up Web staff: Its print strategy in place, the magazine is staffing up on digital, Joe Pompeo reports: “The idea is to supplement magazine content, which is only available online to paying subscribers, while building up traffic that can service banner ads and sponsorships.” (Capital)
  7. Medill changes JR program: “The two new choices allow students to choose their own site, which Medill has to approve beforehand, or students can use an existing internship or fellowship to complete their JR requirement, even if it is done over the summer.” (The Daily Northwestern) | Last option is “biggest change,” a tipster tells Jim Romenesko: “Most seniors have completed 2+ internships excluding JR, so we’ve long griped about paying full tuition to add one more internship to our resumes.” (Romenesko) | Taylor Miller Thomas, who did a JR at Poynter, wrote about the strain of journalism internships last year. (Poynter)
  8. Your newsroom needs an audience development person: When Slate hired Katherine Goldstein, “we all had a lot to learn about traffic online, and she taught us about SEO, social,” Editor Julia Turner tells Lucia Moses. “What’s changed is, everyone in house is on board and understands that their primary job is to write great stories, but finding an audience is their job as well.” (Digiday)
  9. How depressing is the U.K. journalism market? “Frankly, moving abroad was the best thing we could have done, given the bloodbath of the UK media market, falling sales and job losses in recent times,” former Birmingham Mail journo Andy Probert tells Nick Hudson. Probert now works in Turkey. (HoldTheFrontPage.co.uk)
  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Ann Keil will be a reporter for WOFL in Orlando. Previously, she was a reporter at WXIN in Indianapolis. Brooks Tomlin will be the station’s weekend, evening and morning meteorologist. Previously, he worked at the Commercial Weather Services of the Australian Bureau of Meteorology in Perth, Australia. (TV Spy) | Elizabeth Saab and Nick Spinetto will be reporters for KTBC in Austin, Texas. Saab was previously a multimedia journalist for Foxnews.com and Spinetto was a reporter at WMUR in Manchester, New Hampshire. (Austin360.com) | Evan White will be a reporter at WFSB. Previously, he was a reporter and fill-in anchor at WHAM in Rochester, New York. (The Laurel) | Anne McNamara is the host of The Now in Denver. Previously, she was an anchor at WAVY in Norfolk, Virginia. (TV Spy) | Job(s) of the day: The Daily Dot is hiring a morning and an evening editor. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org.

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would like me to send you this roundup each morning? Please email me: abeaujon@poynter.org.

Correction: This post originally spelled Phil Simms’ first name with an extra “l.” Read more

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Luke O’Brien writes about Sidney Harman’s family’s decision to stop investing in Newsweek after he died. It’s but one can’t-miss moment in O’Brien’s story about Tina Brown’s reign at the magazine:

When I asked [former U.S. Rep. and Sidney's widow] Jane Harman recently if the content of the magazine had anything to do with the Harman family’s decision, Harman replied, “Tina had editorial control.” When asked if tasteless covers had anything to do with the Harman family decision, Harman replied again, “Tina had editorial control.” When asked if Jane Harman, personally, has any opinion at all about covers like crazy-eyes Bachmann or zombie Diana, Harman replied a third time, a bit more adamantly, “Tina had editorial control!”

Luke O'Brien, Politico Magazine

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Sacha Lecca, who is Rolling Stone’s deputy photography editor, tells Jim Colton about his early days at Newsweek:

Last but not least, I remember when Newsweek contract photographer Peter Turnley was covering an international crisis (I forget which) and in the middle of the night I got a call from the lobby that Peter Jennings (Anchorman for ABC Network News) was there to see me. I went downstairs and Jennings handed me a Newsweek film envelope and said, “Someone asked me to pass this along.” Turnley, while having trouble finding a flight to ship film back, spotted Jennings about to get on a US military transport to eventually make it home, and asked him to deliver it. His first stop after arriving in New York was to us. I always thought that was so cool. It was the way things got done back then.

Jim Colton, NPPA

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Dorian Nakamoto: ‘I’ll keep my bitcoin account’

In a video filmed alongside Andreas M. Antonopoulos, who is writing a book about bitcoin, Dorian Satoshi Nakamoto again says he’s not Satoshi Nakamoto, bitcoin’s founder. Newsweek last month said he was.

“Of course if I was the real creator I would never use my real name,” Nakamoto says. He says he received a bitcoin account from Antonopoulos and is “very thankful for you, all these people in U.S., Europe, in Asia, in Africa, in South America who supported me throughout.” He says 2,000 people donated. “I’ll keep my bitcoin account for many, many years, and hopefully I can also contribute as you did to me,” Nakamoto says.

Last month, Nakamoto said he’d hired a lawyer and that his “prospects for gainful employment has been harmed because of Newsweek’s article.” Newsweek issued a statement March 7 saying it stands by its story. Read more

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Jon Swaine writes about Johnathan Davis and Etienne Uzac, the owners of IBT Media and Newsweek, who “come with a backstory that is unusual for the mainstream media.” They reportedly met in Christian fellowships and have been linked to a Korean pastor and an evangelical college:

In a Facebook post in February 2013, Davis described as “shockingly accurate” an op-ed article written by Christopher Doyle, the director of the International Healing Foundation (IHF), which works to convert gay people. Davis said it “cuts like a hot knife through a buttery block of lies”. …

When asked if he believed that gay people could be cured, Davis said: “Whether I do or not, I’m not sure how that has any bearing on my capacity here as the founder of the company. I’m not sure how it’s relevant. People believe all sorts of weird things. But from a professional capacity, it’s unrelated.” The post was then removed from his Facebook page.

Jon Swaine, The Guardian

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Subject of Newsweek article denies report, hires lawyer

Felix Salmon | Quartz
Dorian Satoshi Nakamoto sent out a statement Sunday evening saying he has retained a Toronto lawyer and wants “to clear my name”:

Los Angeles lawyer Ethan D. Kirschner told Adam Pasick of Quartz that Nakamoto had retained him. Read more

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