Articles about "NPR"


Barack Obama, Bill Clinton

Obama met with journalists before ISIS speech

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Obama met with journalists before Wednesday’s ISIS speech: “The group, which met in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in an off-the-record session, included New York Times columnists David Brooks, Tom Friedman and Frank Bruni and editorial writer Carol Giacomo; The Washington Post’s David Ignatius, Eugene Robinson and Ruth Marcus; The New Yorker’s Dexter Filkins and George Packer; The Atlantic’s Jeffrey Goldberg and Peter Beinart; The New Republic’s Julia Ioffe; Columbia Journalism School Dean Steve Coll; The Wall Street Journal’s Jerry Seib; and The Daily Beast’s Michael Tomasky, a source familiar with the meeting told The Huffington Post.” (HuffPost)
  2. CBS won’t CNET CBS News: While the company’s news operation benefits from cross-pollination among news properties, it doesn’t have to worry about suits asking for more sinister forms of synergy, Alex Weprin reports: “[W]e are not going to be asked to do something that doesn’t fit for the news division,” Steve Capus says.
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Screen Shot 2014-09-05 at 2.03.50 PM

Here are 9 kinds of stories you’ll see on NPR’s Local Stories Project

Photo by Kasia Podbielski/NPR

NPR’s Local Stories Project officially launched on Wednesday with a Tumblr homepage and a Twitter account. But the idea of sharing local stories with a bigger audience actually started a few years ago.

“The project itself has kind of been churning and gradually expanding since it began as a really tiny experiment in 2011,” said Eric Athas, senior digital news specialist, in a phone interview. Athas works at NPR Digital Services on the editorial coaching and development team.

That experiment started in 2011 with KPLU in Seattle. Athas and his team took stories from the station and shared them through NPR’s Facebook page, geotargeting them to people in the Seattle area.

“What we found is that the stories that we targeted did really well,” he said.… Read more

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NPR’s head of programming to retire

NPR

Ellen McDonnell, NPR’s executive editor for news programming, will retire at the end of the year, Eyder Peralta reported for the network today.

McDonnell had been at the network for nearly 35 years and was “a part of NPR’s DNA,” NPR Chief Content Officer Kinsey Wilson said in an internal memo quoted in Peralta’s story:

“She has touched and transformed nearly every aspect of NPR News, her creativity and zeal surpassed only by her generosity of spirit. When you describe Ellen the words you hear over and over are transparent and authentic. She is the real deal.”

In July, NPR’s senior vice president for news, Margaret Low Smith, left the network to join the Atlantic as president of the company’s events division. NPR got a new president and CEO in Jarl Mohn in May.… Read more

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Diane Sawyer

After Sawyer’s final ABC World News broadcast, all 3 nightly anchors are now white men

Yo. Here are some media stories.

  1. Is the Yo app ridiculous or revolutionary? That’s the question Cory Blair asks. It’s definitely the former, but it has potential to be the latter, especially now that users can send links and not just notifications with no content. Robert Hernandez has an interesting idea for what news organizations like The Washington Post could use Yo for: “whenever an unarmed person dies at the hands of the police, or every time somebody is killed with a gun.” (American Journalism Review)
  2. Diane Sawyer anchors her final ABC World News broadcast: But she’s staying with the network. David Muir is her successor. “Now, all three nightly news anchors are once again white men,” Brian Stelter notes. (CNN)
  3. NPR’s Michel Martin heads to Ferguson: The former “Tell Me More” host will lead a town hall meeting today.
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NPR’s Michel Martin heading to Ferguson: ‘Talking is the one thing we can all do’

St. Louis Public Radio

NPR’s Michel Martin will moderate a town hall meeting at Wellspring Church in Ferguson, Missouri, on Thursday from 6 to 8 p.m. St. Louis Public Radio reports that the event is open to the public and there’s no cost to attend. Martin, who was previously the host of “Tell Me More,” appeared on St. Louis Public Radio’s “St. Louis on the Air” on Tuesday.

“Talking is the one thing we can all do,” she said.

I think one of the things that we hope to do in our field … is show people that you can have these conversations, important ones, difficult ones, painful ones, but you can have them and have them in a way that are constructive. That’s gonna be our task going forward.

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Obama is an ‘enemy to press freedom,’ Risen says

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. More journalists arrested, threatened in Ferguson: Robert Klemko of Sports Illustrated, Telegraph reporter Rob Crilly and Financial Times reporter Neil Munshi all reported being detained last night in Ferguson. (Poynter) | A cop told KARG’s Mustafa Hussein to turn off his light “or you’re getting shot with this,” referring, apparently, to the gun he was holding. Police told MSNBC host Chris Hayes, “Media do not pass us, you’re getting maced next time you pass us.” (Gawker) || St. Louis station KSDK apologizes for showing video of the home of Ferguson Police Officer Darren Wilson, who shot Michael Brown. (KSDK) | Brown was shot 6 times, a private autopsy says.
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Liberia West Africa Ebola

How journalists covering the Ebola outbreak try to stay safe

That tweet came from CNN international correspondent David McKenzie, who’s currently reporting on the Ebola outbreak from Sierra Leone. On Monday, McKenzie filed this story about how he and other journalists at CNN are staying safe while covering a story with worldwide health implications.

“This is more about just having some basic things, like chlorine and water and all of this, to protect yourself, but also just to calm yourself down in what can be a very emotional and scary reporting trip,” he said in the video.

I’ve started a Twitter list of journalists covering the Ebola outbreak from Sierra Leone, Liberia, Guinea and nearby countries. Who am I missing? Please email or tweet suggestions to me at khare@poynter.org or @kristenhare.… Read more

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nprone2

NPR One app potential is huge

Public radio and podcasts have taken on an increasing role in my life. I listen while running, cleaning, cooking, driving long distances or taking public transportation, mostly times when I can afford to multitask, but can’t be looking at video or don’t want the added work of reading text.

I downloaded the NPR One app this week and listened to it twice during long morning jogs, and while I was riding public transportation and hanging out in airports. I’ll stop short of calling it a game-changer. But it’s clear that this app, or one like it, has the potential to become a content platform for news and culture audio, the way Amazon is for shopping or Netflix is for movies.

NPR One is like Pandora for public radio content.… Read more

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CC USA Medien

Employment tumbles again at newspapers, and First Look’s plans shift

Good morning. Here are 10 (OK, maybe not exactly 10) media stories.

  1. The newspaper business lost 1,300 employees last year: “The overall revenue figure, as measured by the Newspaper Association of America, was down 2.6 percent in 2013, close to an even match with the percentage of news job cuts for the year,” Rick Edmonds writes. (Poynter) | One small bright spot: Minority employment was up, after years of stagnating. (Poynter)
  2. An update on First Look Media: “We have definitely rethought some of our original ideas and plans,” Pierre Omidyar writes. (First Look Media) | Jay Rosen: “For First Look the way to a large user base isn’t ‘one big flagship website’ or an ‘everything you need to know’ news app to go up against, say, the Guardian or npr.org.” (PressThink) | Mathew Ingram: “More than anything else, what Omidyar is describing sounds like a real-time journalism lab, one that will test out different ways of interacting with readers around a topic — albeit a lab that happens to have a quarter of a billion dollars behind it.” (Gigaom)
  3. Margot Adler, R.I.P.
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Medical Marijuana Kids

NYT will take pot questions at 4:20 today

Good morning. Here are 10 or so media stories.

  1. BuzzFeed fired Benny Johnson for plagiarism: “After carefully reviewing more than 500 of Benny’s posts, we have found 41 instances of sentences or phrases copied word for word from other sites,” BuzzFeed EIC Ben Smith wrote Friday night. (BuzzFeed) | Smith’s memo to staffers. (@brianstelter) | Johnson’s lifts offend “not only readers but Web journos everywhere who fiddle to no end with their copy to guarantee originality, who link neurotically to eliminate any suggestion of misappropriation, who close and reopen and close and reopen their posts before publishing to re-inspect this little thing or that little thing, and who finally hit ‘publish’ with a plume of palm sweat.” (The Washington Post) | The 34 sources from which Johnson lifted.
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