NPR

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NPR joins tide of publishers getting rid of comments

Citing an ineffective experience that was not particularly well-used, NPR on Wednesday announced that it's getting rid of website comments in favor of other means of communication with listeners, including social media. Scott Montgomery, the managing editor for digital news at NPR, explained the decision in a blog post on NPR.com (that drew no shortage of comments): NPR … Read More
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Ask the Ethicist: When it comes to breaking news, should you admit you might be wrong?

NPR earned applause on Sunday when, in the midst of the chaos of the Orlando shooting, it made an unusual admission. In an unconventional editor's note at the bottom of a breaking news story, NPR admitted that it — and the rest of the media — sometimes report inaccurate information: This is a developing story. Some things that get reported … Read More
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Remembering David Gilkey, NPR's "18th bureau"

He covered the Ebola epidemic in West Africa. He was there to watch the Sundarbans of India swallowed up by climate change. In South Sudan, he bore witness to a food crisis, the fallout from a devastating civil war. In the aftermath of his death Sunday from a grenade attack while covering a story in Afghanistan, David … Read More
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NPR photographer and interpreter killed in Afghanistan

Two journalists were killed in Afghanistan Sunday while reporting for NPR. David Gilkey, a photojournalist, and Zabihullah Tamanna, NPR's Afghan interpreter, were on assignment with an Afghan army unit, which came under attack. This is the first time in NPR's 46-year history that one of its journalists have been killed on assignment, according to CNN. Gilkey devoted much … Read More
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Code Switch wants its new podcast to be a discussion about race​, not a seminar

When Shereen Marisol Meraji and Gene Demby went to Bluefield State College in Bluefield, West Virginia in 2013, they wrote longform stories about the country's Whitest historically Black college, they produced a six-minute radio piece and they did a Reddit AMA. But still, they had so much leftover reporting. A podcast would have been the perfect … Read More
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Journalism has an editing crisis, but we can do something about it

In my early days as a producer at "All Things Considered," I set up a meeting with one of NPR’s newsroom leaders. I was in my mid-20’s, trying to advocate for myself. I told this person, “I want to be an editor.” Was there a pathway for someone like me? The answer was no. Or at least, that was the … Read More
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How NPR and ProPublica exposed America's unequal workers' compensation system

When ProPublica's Michael Grabell was a reporter at The Dallas Morning News, there were three kinds of phone calls he dreaded most. "Family law, V.A. cases and calls involving workers' compensation are impossible to sort out," he said. But as he finished a project about temporary workers injured on the job, he began to get comfortable with state databases … Read More
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Why NPR spent Super Bowl 50 tweeting football haikus

Super Bowl 50:From start to end — in haiku.Want to play along? Just use #SuperBowlHaiku https://t.co/66Yn5SZw0V — NPR (@NPR) February 7, 2016 If you kept an eye on your second screen last night during Super Bowl 50, at some point, a haiku or two might have crossed your Twitter stream. Read More
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ESPN’s The Undefeated will launch in 2016

After a series of setbacks that included the ousting of founding editor Jason Whitlock, ESPN's site focusing on the intersection of race and sports is primed for a launch in 2016. That's according to Kevin Merida, the former Washington Post managing editor who left his post late last year to replace Whitlock at the helm of The Undefeated. Read More
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Michele Norris is leaving NPR

Two years after rejoining NPR, Michele Norris is vacating her slot as a host and special correspondent at the public radio network, NPR news chief Michael Oreskes announced Thursday. Norris, who was formerly a host of "All Things Considered," has been with the network for 13 years, according to a memo addressed to NPR staffers from Oreskes. During her … Read More
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NPR and The New York Times teamed up to make election reporting faster

Although its monopoly on election night race calls has weakened in recent years, The Associated Press is still the authority when it's time to tell America who won (and who lost) an election. That's why journalists are bound to pay attention when The AP changes the way it distributes race calls and polling returns to its network of subscribers. Read More
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NPR is building an analytics bot that emphasizes caring over clicks

Carebot, a forthcoming tool from NPR, aims to help journalists figure out how much their audiences care about their work. Pictured above is a proposed day in the life of a journalist working with Carebot to think about his/her work. (Photo credit: NPR)(Photo credit: Brian Boyer, NPR) For years, journalists have railed against pageviews and uniques, twin metrics that … Read More
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How NPR cut its page load time in half

Last week, NPR implemented changes that make its pages load twice as fast. The site has gone from average page load times of 6.5 to 8 seconds to 3.5 to 4 seconds. On Tuesday, NPR's Patrick Cooper and Justin Bachorik wrote about the changes and offered tips to other Web developers on speeding things up. Here's … Read More
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How news organizations are using The List App to reclaim the listicle

Several news organizations have joined "The List App," which debuted earlier this month. Pop quiz: Which of these shows is produced by NPR? "This American Life" "99% Invisible" "Radiolab" "Prairie Home Companion" The answer? None of them, even though each program airs on public radio stations. Of course, you'd already know this if you followed NPR on The List App, … Read More
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Seeking to bring context to politics, NPR launches fact-checking feature

Acknowledging what will undoubtedly become a major theme of 2016 campaign coverage, NPR on Thursday launched "Break It Down," a regular feature devoted to fact-checking comments made by politicians including the massive field of presidential hopefuls. The first edition, which opened with a hip-hop beat and a remix of Ronald Reagan's now-famous rebuke to Jimmy Carter ("There you … Read More