NPR

Career Beat: Matt Thompson to join theatlantic.com

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • Matt Thompson will be deputy editor of theatlantic.com. He’s currently director of vertical initiatives for NPR. (Poynter)
  • Mat Honan will be Silicon Valley bureau chief for BuzzFeed. He’s an editor and writer at Wired. (Re/code)
  • Justin Yurkanin is now manager of multimedia at Alabama Media Group. Previously, he was a photojournalist for the Las Vegas Review-Journal. (Email)
  • Sarah Karnasiewicz is now food editor of RealSimple.com. Previously, she was a writer at The Wall Street Journal. (Fishbowl NY)

Job of the Day: The (Rochester, New York) Democrat and Chronicle is looking for a senior engagement editor. Get your résumés in! (Career Builder)

Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

Matt Thompson leaves NPR for The Atlantic

Matt Thompson will be the deputy editor of theatlantic.com, NPR staffers were told in a memo Wednesday, David Folkenflik reports. Thompson is NPR’s director of vertical initiatives and will work with site editor J.J. Gould “to help oversee editorial operations and shape strategic development,” The Atlantic says in a press release.

“It’s difficult to count all the ways and all the places where Matt has played a vital role at NPR during his years with us,” NPR managing editor for digital news Scott Montgomery and NPR News Executive Editor Madhulika Sikka write in an email to staffers, which is below.

Thompson, who worked at Poynter in the early 2000s, follows a number of high-profile departures from NPR in recent months. Chief content officer Kinsey Wilson left in October (and later landed at The New York Times). Senior VP for news Margaret Low Smith announced in July she would leave (she headed to The Atlantic, too). VP of content strategy and operations Sarah Lumbard left for United States Holocaust Memorial Museum’s National Institute of Holocaust Education in October. And Joyce MacDonald, who works for the adjacent organization National Public Media, announced last month she would become vice president of journalism at the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

Here’s NPR’s memo.

We are sorry to announce that our friend and colleague Matt Thompson is leaving NPR.

It’s difficult to count all the ways and all the places where Matt has played a vital role at NPR during his years with us. He has helped us advance our digital thinking and has pushed us to bring a strategic approach to creating coverage. At this point, almost everyone in the newsroom has shared a meeting with Matt and has come away better for it.

And so it pains us to see him go. But, after a lengthy deliberation, Matt concluded that he couldn’t turn down the opportunity to become the deputy editor of TheAtlantic.com. He’ll help shape digital strategy at a storied news organization that already serves as an industry leader in that department.

Matt came to NPR in early 2010 as the editorial lead for Project Argo, the collaboration with 12 member stations that produced sites like KQED’s MindShift, WBUR’s CommonHealth, and WXPN’s The Key. Alongside Mark Memmott, he coauthored NPR’s ethics handbook (and worked with Wes Lindamood to code the WordPress template that powers it).

Most recently, he worked with partners across the newsroom to oversee the launch of Code Switch, NPR Ed, and Goats & Soda.

We’ll miss Matt’s smarts and his self-deprecating style and we wish him the best in his new role with the Atlantic. In the days ahead, we’ll announce plans for how we’ll fill Matt’s open position in the newsroom.

Scott and Madhulika

Scott Montgomery

The Atlantic’s release:

December 3, 2014 (Washington, D.C.)—Matt Thompson (@mthomps) will join the leadership of TheAtlantic.com as the deputy editor. Thompson will work with the site’s editor J.J. Gould (@jjgould) to help oversee editorial operations and shape strategic development at a time of record audience growth. Coming from NPR—where he has most recently directed news teams covering race, ethnicity, and culture; education; and global health and development—he will start at The Atlantic in the new year.

“Matt is a force,” said Gould. “He’s creative about new media and their emerging potential, he’s serious about journalism as a public good, and he’s super-smart about the requirements of leadership in a digital organization. He’s also just a natural fit for The Atlantic personally. Working with him is going to be a lot of fun.”

At NPR, Thompson started the Code Switch blog, which he oversaw along with several other topic-focused verticals. He previously helped coordinate 12 local websites in conjunction with NPR member stations and coauthored NPR’s ethics handbook. Before going to NPR, Thompson was the deputy web editor for The Star Tribune in Minneapolis, and he built and ran The Fresno Bee’s news blog, serving as the paper’s first online reporter. Thompson is the vice-chairman of the board at the Center for Public Integrity, a nonprofit organization for investigative journalism, and in 2011 he cofounded SparkCamp, a regular gathering for a diverse range of people from a cross-section of industries.

Thompson is among a number of editors and writers to join The Atlantic in recent months, including business journalists Bourree Lam (@bourreelam), previously with Freakonomics, Alana Semuels (@alanasemuels), formerly with the Los Angeles Times, and Gillian B. White (@gillianbwhite), most recently with Kiplinger; education editor Alia Wong (@aliaemily), formerly with Civil Beat; science writer Nicholas St. Fleur (@scifleur), who previously reported for Scientific American and NPR; and Lenika Cruz (@lenikacruz), formerly with Circa, covering entertainment.

TheAtlantic.com is an award-winning site, publishing dozens of original pieces daily on politics, business, culture, technology, health, education, and global affairs. It is also the digital home of The Atlantic magazine and Atlantic Video. October and November brought record audiences to the site—the best two months in its history in terms of both unique visitors and page views.

Read more
Tools:
0 Comments

NYT names Kinsey Wilson its editor for innovation and strategy

The New York Times Company

Former NPR executive Kinsey Wilson will become editor for innovation and strategy at The New York Times, the company announced Tuesday.

Wilson, who is a trustee for Poynter, left NPR in October.

At the Times he will “be in charge of expanding mobile strategy and creating new digital products inspired by Times journalism like the NYT Now and NYT Cooking apps,” the Times’ release says. Wilson will also “be the newsroom’s main liaison on digital matters to the business side of The Times Company.” Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

‘Profanity dramatically increases engagement’ says NPR health blogger

NPR

NPR health blogger Scott Hensley has a strategy to generate buzz on social media: start cussing.

He told NPR’s Social Media Desk that quoting a little profanity from a recent Jack Shafer interview in a tweet bumped his engagement up to 5 percent:

Posting dog photos, Hensley said, also helps. This pooch picture bumped Hensley’s engagement rate up to 4 percent.

Meanwhile, NPR’s social media guidelines advise reporters to “consider how your conduct in a community will affect your reporting”:

As you adjust behaviors such as language and dress in different situations, think about what might be most helpful or harmful to effective reporting.

Read more
Tools:
0 Comments

NPR: Can the holiday clichés

NPR

A note from NPR standards editor Mark Memmot throws a cup of cold wassail over holiday-season clichés. A selection of his phrases to avoid:

– “Tis the season to …” No, it tisn’t.

– “Oh, the weather outside is …” Don’t put that song in my head!

– “It’s beginning to look a lot like …” Not that one either!

Perhaps to head off criticism, Memmot also advises against comparisons to the Grinch. Read more

Tools:
2 Comments

NYT corrected Gary Hart story after source’s recollection changed

Good morning. Thanks, veterans. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. NYT corrects Gary Hart story

    Former Miami Herald reporter Tom Fiedler disputes the chronology he gave Matt Bai about when he saw Gary Hart's challenge to prove his infidelity. "Therefore, it is likely that the original version of this article, based in large part on Fiedler’s account, referred incorrectly to the point at which any of the Herald journalists first saw the Times article quoting Hart as saying, 'Follow me around,'" the correction reads. "The text has been adjusted accordingly." (NYT) | Bai: "I find it particularly disturbing that Fiedler, someone I'd very much admired, has now invented a new version of events after repeatedly and recently reconfirming his own longstanding account, which is something we as journalists often condemn in the people we cover." (HuffPost)

  2. Journalists and lawyers: A special legal mini-roundup

    ACLU sues St. Louis County police on behalf of Bilgin Şaşmaz, a Turkish journalist arrested in Ferguson in August. "The suit says that Şaşmaz repeatedly said “Press, Press” to identify himself. Caucasian reporters and photographers who were also documenting the incident were not arrested, it says." (St. Louis Post-Dispatch) | Read the suit: (ACLU of Missouri) | Related: AP CEO Gary Pruitt wrote U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder and FBI Director James Comey demanding answers about the FBI's impersonation of an AP reporter and seeking "assurances that this won’t happen again." (AP) | Jack Shafer: "Any blurring of the line between government and press can only benefit the government at the expense of the press and the dilution of the best law the country has, the First Amendment." (Reuters) | Also in journalists and courts: Ben Seibert sues Nancy Grace, who incorrectly reported he "invaded a woman's home and snapped a photo of himself on her phone, which she described as a 'textbook serial killer's calling card.'" (AP)

  3. Russia annexes media

    The Kremlin's new Sputnik service "aims to offer an alternative for people who are 'tired of aggressive propaganda promoting a unipolar world and want a different perspective,' according to its press release." (Moscow Times) | For instance, did you know that Miami was on the brink of secession? (BuzzFeed) | "The editor-in-chief of business daily Kommersant has resigned, triggering speculation Monday that he was forced out over a recent article in the newspaper about oil giant Rosneft." (Moscow Times) | CNN will no longer be broadcast in Russia after the end of the year; it ended distribution deals "following the passage of new media laws in Russia." (Mashable)

  4. Washington Post says Zakaria stories are problematic

    Five of the Post articles ID'd as unoriginal by the mysterious media critics @blippoblappo and @crushingbort are "problematic," editorial page Editor Fred Hiatt said. (Poynter) | Slate corrected a 1998 article he wrote. "I have to distinguish my own view here from Slate’s editorial decision, which I respect but don’t agree with," Slate Group boss Jacob Weisberg tells Dylan Byers. (Politico) | The next thing? "Someone from NYC is editing Zakaria's Wikipedia page to remove notes about his plagiarism and fix his mom's name." (@blippoblappo)

  5. NPR's ombudsman search is taking a while

    Edward Schumacher-Matos' last day keeps getting postponed. (Media Moves)

  6. The New Yorker paywall returns

    "We are quite reliably told that" on Tuesday "the Web site of the New Yorker, the last magazine in the world, will no longer offer the entirety of its archives, going back to 2007, for free." (The Awl)

  7. Is it time to forgive Stephen Glass?

    Hanna Rosin visits her former New Republic colleague, who has reassembled his life as a paralegal in California. "When clients come in, Steve helps the firm get them ready for trial. The first thing he does is tell them who he is. He says he worked at a magazine and he lied and made up stories and covered them up. He says he got caught, that Hollywood made a movie about it and that there are many people 'who dislike me and rightly so.'" (The New Republic)

  8. Meanwhile, in Australia

    Reporter drinks camel's milk for a month. (The Advertiser)

  9. Front page of the day, curated by Kristen Hare

    A chiseled salute to veterans on the Arizona Republic. (Courtesy the Newseum)

    arizonarepublic-11112014 

  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin

    Greg Jaffe will cover the White House for The Washington Post. Previously, he covered the Pentagon there. Steve Mufson will cover the White House for The Washington Post. He covers the energy industry there. (Washington Post) | Herman Wong has joined the Washington Post's social media team. Previously, he was on the social media team at Quartz. (Washington Post) | Peter Holley is now a reporter on the general assignment desk at The Washington Post. Previously, he was an associate editor at Houstonia magazine. (Washington Post) | Joyce MacDonald is now vice president of journalism at the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Previously, she was interim president and CEO at National Public Media. (Poynter) | Job of the day: The Center (Texas) Light and Champion is looking for a reporter. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org.

Corrections? Tips? Please email me: abeaujon@poynter.org. Would you like to get this roundup emailed to you every morning? Sign up here. Read more

Tools:
0 Comments
magliozzi-100

Why so many people loved Tom Magliozzi’s storytelling

FILE In this July 9, 1991 file photo, Brothers Tom, left, and Ray Magliozzi pose under a car hood in Boston.   Tom Magliozzi died today of complications from Alzheimer's disease. He was 77. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

FILE In this July 9, 1991 file photo, Brothers Tom, left, and Ray Magliozzi pose under a car hood in Boston. Tom Magliozzi died today of complications from Alzheimer’s disease. He was 77. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

The one thing about the news that is eternal, I guess, is that you never know for sure who is going to die next.  One day in 1977 I was walking through the newsroom of the St. Petersburg Times and ran into Mike Foley, the city editor. “What’s new?” I asked him. “Elvis is dead,” he said.

Back then it was Elvis, and today, I learned, it was Tom Magliozzi, a dimmer star in the celebrity heavens than the King, but a special personality in his own right. With his brother Ray, he hosted Car Talk, a radio feast for almost 40 years, now in syndication.

If you’ve heard the show once, you know the ingredients:

  • Chatter about popular cultural and the events of the day.
  • Brainy jokes about language, wives, or automobiles.
  • The vestigial remains of what we used to call a “Boston accent.”
  • Four or five phone calls from all over the nation and sometimes beyond, complaining about that squeak coming from under the dashboard or the smell of gas coming from the trunk.
  • A brain teaser called the Weekly Puzzler.
  • And lots and lots of laughter.

What was great about these guys is that they were authentically from the Boston-Italian working class, kids from the neighborhood who happened to have degrees in chemical engineering from MIT. They could talk about engines the ways the Jack Nicklaus can talk about a golf swing, the way Shakespeare, I imagine, could talk about the sonnet.

Part of their genius was to latch themselves on to something huge and almost universal. It could have been music, food, or love. In their case it was THE CAR.  Their interest of course, was not just the car, but all of the human relationships the car enabled or distressed.

Coincidentally, I just spent a couple of lucky days in Detroit working with the good journalists from Automotive News. I told them, though they already knew, how lucky they were to be writing about cars.  No other invention, I argued, had inspired more song lyrics or stories than the American automobile.  At least one of us, I opined without evidence, was probably conceived in the back seat of a Ford or Chevrolet.

Write down the themes you think of when you imagine a car: Freedom, escape from home, commuting to work, going on vacation, the drive-in movie, the drive-through window, crime, sex, family, the suburbs, pollution, accidents, speeding tickets, love, and, of course, death.

The Magliozzi Brothers tapped into that culture like few others in American entertainment history.  They understood the almost universal American experience of wanting, needing a set of wheels, and the incredible frustration when that vehicle lets you down, or costs you money.

I once suggested to someone in Boston, I forget who, that what was then the Nieman Narrative Conference should invite Tom and Ray to do a panel discussion, or even better, to do a live broadcast of their show at Harvard. The reaction I got suggested that they would prefer someone like Tom Wolfe or Norman Mailer.

But in their own mode, Click and Clack (their nicknames) were masters of the narrative arts. When a caller called, there was often banter about how the caller got her unusual name and something about the city, town, or village from whence they came. The more remote the town or the more interesting the name, the more occasion there was for some lively anecdote.

More storytelling might precede the automotive problem, “My husband and I are having an argument about when to use the emergency brake, so we turned to you guys to find out which one of us is right.” Or, “I just got a divorce, and I want to know what kind of a car I should buy to attract women who are in their 40s.”

Then of course, came the description of the problem, which almost always had narrative elements. “On cold mornings the sound is really loud until I get on the Interstate. It goes away when I hit 60 mph, but then my steering wheel starts to shake.”

What follows is the automotive equivalent of a mystery story, with Tom and Ray sifting through the evidence like Holmes and Watson. What did it sound like? When did you first hear it? What did your mechanic say? And, when they hit on a possible explanation, there was one more story to be told: “This is what I think is happening with your Subaru.”

I suddenly realize that I’ve been writing about Tom and Ray as if they are both now dead, T-boned, perhaps, by a tractor trailer on their route from the garage to the recording studio. Ray, the lead singer of the duo, it turns out, is still with us. But there are certain acts that never seem to work as a solo. This, I fear, is one of them. My condolences, of course, go to Ray and the entire Magliozzi family. They gave me and my wife (who is from Rhode Island and used to talk like them!) many laughs and, from time to time, saved me a few bucks when it came to fixing my car. But nothing was more valuable than those stories. Read more

Tools:
2 Comments

Career Beat: Arianna Huffington to get new chief of staff

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • Elise Hu will be NPR’s Asia correspondent in Seoul. She covers tech and culture at NPR. (Poynter)
  • Mitra Kalita is now executive editor-at-large for Quartz. Previously, she was ideas editor there. Paul Smalera will be Quartz’ new ideas editor. He is editor of The New York Times opinion app. (Poynter)
  • Donald Baer is now chairman of PBS’ board of directors. He is CEO of Burson-Marsteller. (PBS)
  • Jessica Coen is now a contributing editor at Marie Claire. She is an editor-at-large with Jezebel. (Fishbowl NY)
  • Stephen Lacy is now chairman of the Association of Magazine Media. He is CEO of the Meredith Corporation. (Email)
  • Dan Katz will be chief of staff to Arianna Huffington. He’s currently a chief researcher for David Gergen. Maxwell Strachan is now senior editor of business and tech at The Huffington Post. Previously, he was business editor there. (email)
  • Emily Yoshida will be entertainment editor at The Verge. Previously, she was culture editor at Grantland. (Muck Rack)

Job of the day: The Virginian-Pilot is looking for a digital news editor. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs)

Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

NPR to open Seoul bureau

NPR | Fishbowl NY

National Public Radio Wednesday revealed plans to open a bureau in Seoul, South Korea, naming culture and technology reporter Elise Hu its Asia correspondent there.

In addition to being at the heart of a technological and economic force, the bureau is strategically placed near multiple countries of interest to NPR, including Japan and China, Hu said. From there, she’ll be able to coordinate with NPR bureaus in other cities, including New Delhi, Islamabad and Beijing.

The opportunity to report overseas is a huge privilege, she said. Her family — including her husband, Wall Street Journal data journalist Matt Stiles — will make the move with her.

“I obviously had to talk it over with my family,” Hu said. “This is indeed a cross-planet move, but my husband is on board. He’s an incredibly talented journalist in his own right, so I’m confident that something will work out for him.”

The bureau, which will open in 2015, will consist of Hu and a translator-assistant, who she’ll hire.

Hu came to NPR in 2011 to help develop StateImpact network, a government reporting project, according to the announcement. Before that, she was a founding reporter at The Texas Tribune, a journalism non-profit based in Austin, Texas.

Hu wrote about the move on her blog:

I don’t know what to do with our house yet. I am panicked about getting to see the final episodes of Mad Men without too much time delay. I worry about my 16-year-old dog surviving a cross-planet move. I am unsure of my own abilities to cover a place where I am illiterate.

But I’m also filled with excitement and wonder and gratitude for the chance to do this. I know how rare a privilege it is these days to get a chance to work overseas, supported by a large, well-funded news organization. As my friend and mentor Kinsey said, it’s invaluable experience that will change and shape our lives.

She also tweeted about it:

Read more

Tools:
1 Comment

Career Beat: Fred Santarpia named chief digital officer at Condé Nast

Good morning! Here are some job moves from the journalism community:

  • Sarah Lumbard is now senior digital curator at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum’s National Institute of Holocaust Education. Previously, she was vice president of content strategy and operations at NPR. (Poynter)
  • Fred Santarpia will be executive vice president and chief digital officer at Condé Nast. Previously, he was executive vice president at Condé Nast Entertainment. (Poynter)
  • Hassan Hamdani is editor-in-chief at HuffPost Morocco. Previously, he was editor-in-chief of TelQuel’s multimedia division. (HuffPost)
  • Bernardo Chévez is now vice president of technology at Hearst Magazines International. Previously, he was director of engineering at Condé Nast. (Fishbowl NY)

Job of the day: The Washington Post is looking for an editorial copyeditor. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs)

Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

Get the latest media news delivered to your inbox.


Select the newsletter(s) you'd like to receive:
Page 2 of 3012345678910...Last »