NPR

NPR standards editor voices disapproval of Affleck episode on PBS

NPR

An episode of PBS’ “Finding Your Roots” that glossed over the slave-owning heritage of movie star Ben Affleck is not in keeping with standards at NPR, Standards and Practices Editor Mark Memmott wrote Wednesday.

Let’s keep this simple: The people we interview, the sources we use and the supporters who give us money do not shape or dictate what we report.

NPR neither produces nor distributes “Finding Your Roots,” although the two organizations are the among the most prominent public media organizations in the United States and are both represented by the same corporate sponsorship organization, National Public Media. WGBH, where much of PBS’ content is produced, is an NPR member station.

The controversy surrounding Affleck’s appearance on “Finding Your Roots” began after a cache of documents stolen from Sony Pictures Entertainment and published on Wikileaks revealed that the actor requested that the show omit the fact that one of his relatives owned slaves, according to the Los Angeles Times. Read more

Tools:
2 Comments

NPR editors: Chuy broadcast did not meet our standards

NPR

An episode of the NPR-distributed program “Latino USA” that focused on the campaign of Chicago mayoral candidate Jesus “Chuy” Garcia did not meet standards of fairness and completeness, the public radio network’s editors said Friday.

The editors raised a number of concerns about the hourlong program, which aired four days before the runoff election between Garcia and Chicago mayor Rahm Emanuel. They noted that unflattering charges made against Emanuel by his critics stood unchallenged in the episode while nearly no criticism was leveled at Garcia.

Earlier Friday, NPR ombudsman Elizabeth Jensen addressed the concerns raised by listeners and NPR executives, which stemmed from the program’s decision to run the episode just before the election, focus heavily on Garcia’s side of the campaign and include unanswered criticisms of Emanuel’s camp:

The Latino USA production team clearly felt it was important to get the other side.

Read more
Tools:
3 Comments
NPR Headquarters

Inside NPR’s podcasting strategy

NPR's headquarters in Washington, D.C.

NPR’s headquarters in Washington, D.C.


In January, months after “Serial” rocketed to the top of the iTunes podcasting charts and ignited a conversation about the “Golden Age of Audio,” NPR was preparing to answer with a hit of its own.

The show had spent more than a year in development. For its launch, staffers used every bit of experience they’d gained about how to engineer a popular program: They cross-promoted previews of the show on podcasting staples like “This American Life” and “Radiolab,” coordinated a media campaign, even set aside a modest sum — about $1,500 — to buy Facebook ads promoting the show.

It paid off.

Since “Invisibilia” launched on Jan. 6, its episodes have been downloaded more than 33 million times, briefly eclipsing “Serial” on the iTunes charts. Read more

Tools:
2 Comments

NPR editor: be careful using ‘suicide’ in Germanwings case

NPR

Mark Memmott, standards and practices editor at NPR, gave journalists there two reasons to be cautious of the word “suicide” to describe the death of Andreas Lubitz, the co-pilot of a Germanwings flight who may have purposefully forced the plane down:

— His motivation and state of mind aren’t known (and may never be).

– The investigation into what happened is still in the early stages.

Memmott also writes that the word “suicide” may not be adequate given that Lubitz might have deliberately crashed the plane. He also addressed the use of other formulations that incorporate “suicide,” including “suicide bomber” and “committed suicide.” In both cases, better alternatives exist, he says.

The AP Stylebook on Friday previewed a new entry for its forthcoming 2015 edition, recommending journalists should avoid using “committed suicide,” preferring instead “killed himself, took her own life or died by suicide.”

Committed, the new entry notes, “suggests possibly an illegal act” that is inconsistent with laws in certain U.S. Read more

Tools:
2 Comments

NPR updates ethics policy after ombud raises political advocacy questions

NPR

NPR has revised its ethics code to describe which staffers it covers after network ombudsman Elizabeth Jensen raised questions about host Diane Rehm’s attendance at fundraising dinners for the right-to-die movement. Jensen explained the update in a new post:

The changes follow the debate sparked when The Washington Post reported that Diane Rehm, the host of the NPR-distributed The Diane Rehm Show, was taking part in fundraising dinners for Compassion & Choices. That non-profit organization’s activities include lobbying for states to permit medically-assisted death.

At heart the heart of the issue was whether NPR’s stricture preventing journalists from engaging in political advocacy should apply to Rehm, who hosts “The Diane Rehm Show” at WAMU in Washington, D.C., an NPR member station. The new guidelines make clear that the prohibition applies to “those who work for shows, podcasts and programming that are not part of the News division,” Jensen writes. Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

Career Beat: Kevin Krolicki named Washington bureau chief at Reuters

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • Kevin Krolicki has been named Washington bureau chief at Reuters. Previously, he was Japan bureau chief there. (Poynter)
  • Michael Oreskes is now senior vice president of news and editorial director at NPR. Previously, he was vice president and senior managing editor of The Associated Press. (Poynter)
  • Amy Gardner is now senior local politics editor at The Washington Post. Previously, she covered the White House there. (Washington Post)
  • Dakarai Turner is now a reporter and multimedia journalist at WMAR in Baltimore. Previously, he was a reporter at WLTX. (TV Spy)
  • Julie Shapiro is now news editor on the global continuous publishing desk at Time. Previously, she was news editor at DNAinfo.
Read more
Tools:
0 Comments

Michael Oreskes named senior vice president of news at NPR

NPR CEO Jarl Mohn on Thursday appointed Michael Oreskes to senior vice president of news and editorial director, according to a press release from NPR.

Oreskes, currently vice president and senior managing editor of The Associated Press, will begin at NPR in late April, according to the release. Oreskes replaces Chris Turpin, who was named interim senior vice president of news after Margaret Low Smith departed for The Atlantic.

Turpin, who was previously the executive producer of “All Things Considered,” will become vice president of news at NPR in charge of news programs, newscasts, news operations and collaborative coverage, among other things, according to the release.

Oreskes, who joined The Associated Press in 2008, also did stints at The International Herald Tribune and The New York Times, where he was deputy managing editor, assistant managing editor and Washington bureau chief. Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

Karen Everhart discusses recent changes at NPR

Karen Everhart, Managing editor of Current, the newspaper and website about public and nonprofit media in the U.S., was recently at the Poynter Institute for the Effective Editor seminar and we talked about the state of public media.

In this clip, Everhart talks about recent changes at NPR that including the hiring of a new President and CEO Jarl Mohn.

Here is a recent Q&A that Current did with Jarl Mohn. Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

Which news organizations let their reporters swear?

NPR standards editor Mark Memmott issued a terse reminder this morning — packaged with a wry headline — to bleep out swear words in their entirety:

If a word needs to be bleeped, no part of it should be heard. We don’t try to give listeners a hint by including a bit of the word’s start or end.

The post, titled “Bleep The Whole @#$%&*! Word,” links out to NPR’s profanity standards, which state that “language that depicts or describes sexual or excretory activities or organs is indecent or profane.” There are some exceptions: If the profanity is newsworthy or aired after 10 p.m., it might be permitted.

With his post, Memmott becomes the third standards referee to raise the issue of profanity in recent weeks. Read more

Tools:
1 Comment

Career Beat: Teri Hayt named executive director at ASNE

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • Dashiell Bennett will be news editor at Bloomberg Markets. Previously, he was news editor at The Atlantic. (@TheStalwart)
  • Kate Bennett will be a gossip columnist at Politico. She is fashion editor at Washingtonian. (Email)
  • Teri Hayt will be executive director of the American Society of News Editors. She is executive editor of GateHouse Media Ohio (Email)
  • Pamela Padilla is now a multimedia journalist for KDEN. Previously, she was Web editor for KXTX. (Media Moves)
  • Chelsea Manning will be a columnist for Guardian U.S. Previously, she was an Army intelligence analyst. (NPR)

Job of the day: Wired is looking for a features editor. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs)

Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org Read more

Tools:
0 Comments
Page 2 of 3312345678910...Last »