NPR

NPR updates ethics policy after ombud raises political advocacy questions

NPR

NPR has revised its ethics code to describe which staffers it covers after network ombudsman Elizabeth Jensen raised questions about host Diane Rehm’s attendance at fundraising dinners for the right-to-die movement. Jensen explained the update in a new post:

The changes follow the debate sparked when The Washington Post reported that Diane Rehm, the host of the NPR-distributed The Diane Rehm Show, was taking part in fundraising dinners for Compassion & Choices. That non-profit organization’s activities include lobbying for states to permit medically-assisted death.

At heart the heart of the issue was whether NPR’s stricture preventing journalists from engaging in political advocacy should apply to Rehm, who hosts “The Diane Rehm Show” at WAMU in Washington, D.C., an NPR member station. The new guidelines make clear that the prohibition applies to “those who work for shows, podcasts and programming that are not part of the News division,” Jensen writes. Read more

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Career Beat: Kevin Krolicki named Washington bureau chief at Reuters

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • Kevin Krolicki has been named Washington bureau chief at Reuters. Previously, he was Japan bureau chief there. (Poynter)
  • Michael Oreskes is now senior vice president of news and editorial director at NPR. Previously, he was vice president and senior managing editor of The Associated Press. (Poynter)
  • Amy Gardner is now senior local politics editor at The Washington Post. Previously, she covered the White House there. (Washington Post)
  • Dakarai Turner is now a reporter and multimedia journalist at WMAR in Baltimore. Previously, he was a reporter at WLTX. (TV Spy)
  • Julie Shapiro is now news editor on the global continuous publishing desk at Time. Previously, she was news editor at DNAinfo.
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Michael Oreskes named senior vice president of news at NPR

NPR CEO Jarl Mohn on Thursday appointed Michael Oreskes to senior vice president of news and editorial director, according to a press release from NPR.

Oreskes, currently vice president and senior managing editor of The Associated Press, will begin at NPR in late April, according to the release. Oreskes replaces Chris Turpin, who was named interim senior vice president of news after Margaret Low Smith departed for The Atlantic.

Turpin, who was previously the executive producer of “All Things Considered,” will become vice president of news at NPR in charge of news programs, newscasts, news operations and collaborative coverage, among other things, according to the release.

Oreskes, who joined The Associated Press in 2008, also did stints at The International Herald Tribune and The New York Times, where he was deputy managing editor, assistant managing editor and Washington bureau chief. Read more

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Karen Everhart discusses recent changes at NPR

Karen Everhart, Managing editor of Current, the newspaper and website about public and nonprofit media in the U.S., was recently at the Poynter Institute for the Effective Editor seminar and we talked about the state of public media.

In this clip, Everhart talks about recent changes at NPR that including the hiring of a new President and CEO Jarl Mohn.

Here is a recent Q&A that Current did with Jarl Mohn. Read more

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Which news organizations let their reporters swear?

NPR standards editor Mark Memmott issued a terse reminder this morning — packaged with a wry headline — to bleep out swear words in their entirety:

If a word needs to be bleeped, no part of it should be heard. We don’t try to give listeners a hint by including a bit of the word’s start or end.

The post, titled “Bleep The Whole @#$%&*! Word,” links out to NPR’s profanity standards, which state that “language that depicts or describes sexual or excretory activities or organs is indecent or profane.” There are some exceptions: If the profanity is newsworthy or aired after 10 p.m., it might be permitted.

With his post, Memmott becomes the third standards referee to raise the issue of profanity in recent weeks. Read more

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Career Beat: Teri Hayt named executive director at ASNE

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • Dashiell Bennett will be news editor at Bloomberg Markets. Previously, he was news editor at The Atlantic. (@TheStalwart)
  • Kate Bennett will be a gossip columnist at Politico. She is fashion editor at Washingtonian. (Email)
  • Teri Hayt will be executive director of the American Society of News Editors. She is executive editor of GateHouse Media Ohio (Email)
  • Pamela Padilla is now a multimedia journalist for KDEN. Previously, she was Web editor for KXTX. (Media Moves)
  • Chelsea Manning will be a columnist for Guardian U.S. Previously, she was an Army intelligence analyst. (NPR)

Job of the day: Wired is looking for a features editor. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs)

Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org Read more

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Career Beat: Jorge Mettey named vice president of news at Azteca América

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • Jorge Mettey is now vice president of news and community relations at Azteca América. Previously, he was senior vice president of news at MundoFox. (Media Moves)
  • Jeffrey Dastin is now U.S. airlines correspondent for Reuters. Previously, he was an intern there. (Email)
  • Melisa Goh will be senior home page editor at CNN. Previously, she was weekend editor at NPR.org. (Email)
  • Keith Connors is now news director for WTNH in New Haven, Connecticut. Previously, he was news director for WTHR in Indianapolis. Dave Ciliberti is now news director for WCMH in Columbus, Ohio. Previously, he was news director for WTEN/WXXA in Albany, New York. (Rick Gevers)

Job of the day: CBS Interactive is looking for an associate editor. Read more

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How long will Brian Williams be out of the anchor chair?

Good morning. I’m subbing for Kristen today. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Brian Williams cancels Letterman appearance

    Over the weekend, "a source close to Williams" said the NBC anchor will not keep his scheduled appearance on "Late Show with David Letterman," the same show where he erroneously claimed he was aboard a helicopter that took enemy fire. (CNN) | On Sunday, Politico's Mike Allen suggested that appearing on the talk show might be a "high-profile, controlled way for Williams to clear the air." (Politico) | On Saturday, the embattled "NBC Nightly News" anchor announced he would take a hiatus from the show for "several days," adding that he planned to return and "be worthy of the trust" of his audience. (Poynter) | Meanwhile, media reporters and critics are contemplating the scandal's affect on Williams' career.

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Melody Kramer: WNYC is helping people learn to be bored again

Illustration by John Hersey, courtesy of WNYC

Illustration by John Hersey, courtesy of WNYC

I fiddle with my phone everywhere: waiting for the subway, on the subway, on the street, on the escalator and in bed. I need help, and I’m the first to admit it.

So I was pretty pleased to find WNYC’s new Bored and Brilliant campaign. The premise is pretty simple: We’re all addicted to our phones. We can’t stop looking at our phones, particularly when we’re bored. And constantly looking at our phones when we’re bored could be incredibly bad for our potential creative output, according to recent research.

In January, WNYC’s technology podcast New Tech City launched Bored and Brilliant, a new online and podcast campaign that’s asking people to both monitor their smartphone habits and consciously try to change them over the course of a week through a series of emailed challenges designed to spark creativity and inspire spacing out. Read more

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How a listener’s complaint improved NPR’s reporting

Dan Charles, NPR Agriculture Reporter

Dan Charles, NPR Agriculture Reporter

National Public Radio’s Dan Charles taught journalists two lessons Monday morning. One lesson is that simple solutions to complex problems usually don’t work. The other lesson is when your public takes the time to contact you about your reporting, and you take the comments seriously, you may just find an even better story.

Charles is NPR’s agriculture reporter and on Jan. 12, he reported a story about the problem of nitrates that run off of farm fields into Iowa’s waterways.

Charles is a careful reporter, he has studied science, technology and international affairs. He has written about fertilizer use in China and has a degree in business in international affairs.

In his story he reported;

“Farmers spread nitrogen fertilizer on their corn fields, it turns into nitrate and then it commonly runs into streams through networks of underground tile pipes that drain the soil.”

Sarah Carlson,  Practical Farmers of Iowa

Sarah Carlson, Practical Farmers of Iowa

But a listener, Sarah Carlson, heard Charles’ story on the radio as she was driving to work and, she said, she hoped her beloved NPR would not fall into the same old storyline that is so often accepted not just as fact, but truth. Read more

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