Articles about "NPR"


Why are so many news organizations still worried about retweets by staffers?

Here’s our roundup of the top digital and social media stories you should know about (and from Andrew Beaujon, 10 media stories to start your day, and from Kristen Hare, a world roundup):

— At Reuters, Jack Shafer picks up on my piece yesterday about how so many news organizations — with The New York Times being a notable exception — still seem afraid of reporters’ retweets coming across as endorsements: “Are NPR, the AP, and Reuters’s editorial reputations really so fragile that a 140-character tweet or retweet by a staffer can blow the whole thing down?”

— Three months into the “temporary” Chicago Sun-Times comments ban, publisher and editor-in-chief Jim Kirk tells Robert Feder “he’s heard no complaints lately and he’s seen no drop-off in online traffic.” Comments should return with a new CMS “sometime around the fourth quarter.”

— BuzzFeed’s director of editorial products, Alice DuBois, on the photo “slide things” in popular posts lately: “I do think there’s a part of the editorial mission to keep pushing and experimenting,” she tells Poynter’s Andrew Beaujon.… Read more

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Retweets are endorsements at NPR and AP, but not at NYT

NPR is still worried that retweets can easily be misconstrued as endorsements, according to a memo from standards and practices supervising editor Mark Memmott obtained by Jim Romenesko.

According to Memmott, “despite what many say, retweets should be viewed AS endorsements.” He quoted from NPR’s ethics handbook:

“Tweet and retweet as if what you’re saying or passing along is information that you would put on the air or in a ‘traditional’ NPR.org news story. If it needs context, attribution, clarification or ‘knocking down,’ provide it.”

The reiterated policy of treating every retweet as a message that could be dangerously misconstrued comes in light of an education blogger lamenting on an official NPR account that “only the white guys get back to me” on deadline.… Read more

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New Yorker to introduce metered paywall; New York Times adds deputy-level digital editors

Here’s our roundup of the top digital and social media stories you should know about (and from Andrew Beaujon, a world roundup):

— All articles published in The New Yorker since 2007 will be free online for three months as the magazine gets set to introduce a metered paywall. As it stands, the site’s mix of free and subscriber-only content has been “this kind of awkward, the best we could do, kind of paywall, where we held things back,” editor David Remnick tells Ravi Somaiya of The New York Times.

— The Times will add a deputy-level digital editor to each of its main news desks, according to a memo from executive editor Dean Baquet shared by Jeremy Barr at Capital New York. The role will include managing social media, audience development and long-term innovative projects.… Read more

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Glenn Greenwald returns, Daily Mail removes Clooney story

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. U.S. officials warned Muslims about Greenwald story: Glenn Greenwald and Murtaza Hussain reported in a piece published early Wednesday that the FBI and NSA have “covertly monitored the emails of prominent Muslim-Americans.” Prior to publication, they write, Justice Department officials “were reaching out to Muslim-American leaders across the country to warn them that the piece would contain errors and misrepresentations, even though it had not yet been written.” (The Intercept) | The authors will discuss the story on Reddit. (@ggreenwald)
  2. New Yorker plans changes to paywall: All articles will be available free for three months starting July 21, then it plans to charge “its most avid readers through a subscription plan.” (NYT)
  3. BuzzFeed reporter “would suck” at clickbait: BuzzFeed “hired me because they want me to do what I’ve done before: big investigative projects,” Chris Hamby writes in an AMA.
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NPR left two words out of the Declaration of Independence, listeners caught mistake

NPR

In its annual reading of the Declaration of Independence, NPR’s “Morning Edition” accidentally omitted two words.

On Monday, hosts Renee Montagne and Steve Inskeep apologized to Thomas Jefferson, the original colonies and the whole country for leaving out the words, “establish commerce.”

“The most impressive part of the episode is that sharp-eared listeners caught this omission fairly deep in our founding document,” Montagne said. “If we’d said, ‘When in the course of events,’ many people would have caught it.”

She and Inskeep thought of other well-known documents and what those would look like minus a word or two.

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Mobile trends to watch in second half of 2014; plus, a newsgathering guide to Tweetdeck

Here’s our roundup of the top digital and social media stories you should know about (and from Andrew Beaujon, 10 media stories to start your day, and from Kristen Hare, a world roundup):

— At Poynter, Adam Hochberg explores in depth Gannett’s three-year CMS overhaul to “replace the existing systems and serve every Gannett newsroom – from USA Today to KHOU-TV in Houston to the Fort Collins Coloradoan.”

Frédéric Filloux runs down three mobile trends to watch for the rest of 2014, including questions about what news sites should do about the market of Android users — which is bigger than the iOS market but less lucrative.

Joanna Geary, Twitter UK’s head of news, visited the Wall Street Journal in June to share tips on how to use Tweetdeck to gather news.… Read more

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Glen Taylor’s plans for Star Tribune, NPR’s new approach to diversity

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. AP hires robots: The news co-op will use automation technology from Automated Insights to produce more than 4,000 earnings-reports stories (it now produces about 300). No job cuts: “If anything, we are doubling down on the journalism we will do around earnings reports and business coverage,” AP’s Lou Ferrara says. (Poynter) || Related: “Can a robot-journalist win a Pulitzer Prize?” Laugh it up while you can, humans. (HuffPost)
  2. Glen Taylor plans to appoint his daughter to the Star Tribune’s board: Deal is “on the verge of closing.” He tells Curt Brown, “Most business guys are saying about the newspaper thing: ‘Don’t do it. Don’t do it,’ and that’s why I’m doing it.” (The Star Tribune)
  3. NY1 will stop using the term “illegal immigrant”: “Instead, staff are encouraged to indicate that an individual is ‘here illegally,’ with ‘undocumented immigrant’ as a permissible fallback.” (Capital)
  4. Twitter says JAV can stay: During its broadcast of Jose Antonio Vargas‘ film “Documented” last night, CNN polled people with a tweet: “Do you think Jose should be deported?” 63 percent of people said he should stay.
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Hillary Clinton

Hillary Clinton criticizes Terry Gross for being ‘persistent’

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KCRW targets streaming listeners on mobile with new website

Listeners of Santa Monica’s KCRW have another option now for listening to its famous music programming and NPR shows: inside a mobile browser.

The new KCRW.com has a persistent audio player, meaning it continues to play even as visitors navigate from page to page on the site. KCRW has ditched its old Flash-based player, so it works on mobile browsers now, too.

KCRW general manager Jennifer Ferro told Poynter via phone that streaming listeners historically have gravitated toward the KCRW apps, while on-demand listeners tend to download podcasts. The new browser-based, mobile-friendly player makes it easier for newcomers to listen, particularly if they arrive via social media. As Ferro put it, “the app requires an extra step if you don’t already have the app.”… Read more

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NPR: 1960 doc ‘Harvest of Shame’ is ‘more like advocacy than journalism’

NPR

How much impact did CBS’ 1960 documentary “Harvest of Shame” have? On Saturday, NPR’s Elizabeth Blair looked back at the program, which showed Americans scenes of what life was like for migrant workers. By modern standards, “‘Harvest of Shame’ feels more like advocacy than journalism,” Blair reported:

In his closing remarks, [Edward R.] Murrow looks squarely into the camera and urges viewers to take action: “The people you have seen have the strength to harvest your fruit and vegetables. They do not have the strength to influence legislation. Maybe we do.”

The New York Times called the documentary uncompromising, Blair reported. Time said it was exaggerated. “The style was part expose journalism, part a deep digging investigative report,” Dan Rather told NPR. Blair spoke with people interviewed in the documentary and their families about “Harvest of Shame,” and some inaccuracies.… Read more

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