Articles about "Ombudsmen"


How Jim Brady plans to make money in local

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Was SI’s LeBron James scoop legit? Sam Kirkland rounds up some thinkination from thinkinators and notes that SND’s Rob Schneider said the NYT’s celebrated sports section front on Saturday was inaccurate — James hadn’t signed at the time. (Poynter) | The “item did move on the sports AP wire, exactly as presented,” Margaret Sullivan writes. “I guess I can see his point, but it’s too literal,” Benjamin Hoffman, who designed the page, told her. (NYT) | James decided to go to SI rather than ESPN because 2010′s “The Decision” “upset America’s collective stomach and spoiled his reputation as a basketball god,” Robert Weintraub writes. “The average fan could read his moving, sincere announcement on SI.com and subconsciously think, Maybe it was ESPN’s fault, not LeBron’s, all along.” (CJR) | The “trade rumor — shorthand here for any offseason transaction news — has become the dominant form of NBA journalism.” (Grantland)
  2. How Jim Brady plans to make money in local: His Philly news startup Brother.ly will use a “mix of advertising, events and memberships,” Joe Pompeo reports.
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Washington Post names new reader representative

The Washington Post

Alison Coglianese will succeed Doug Feaver as The Washington Post’s “reader representative,” the Post announced Thursday. She will “help make sure that reader questions and complaints are directed to the right place and responded to appropriately,” the announcement says. “She will also answer questions from time to time on the Ask the Post blog.”

Post Editorial Page Editor Fred Hiatt told Joe Strupp in January that Coglianese may assume the role.

The Post did away with a traditional ombudsman role last March, saying “media writers inside and outside The Post will continue to hold us accountable for what we write.” Feaver explained to Poynter’s Craig Silverman why he wouldn’t be an ombudsman: I’m not [charged with] holding the newsroom accountable,” he said.… Read more

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Guardian ombudsman explains decision to remove Keller post

The Guardian | The New York Times | NPR

There were problems with the style and tone of Emma Keller’s Jan. 8 piece about Lisa Bonchek Adams, who has stage IV breast cancer and writes about her experiences on Twitter. There were editing problems and some difficulties that, for now, likely won’t be resolved, Chris Elliott, the Guardian readers’ editor, wrote Thursday.

The Guardian removed Keller’s piece from its site Jan. 13, after a wave of reader complaints and a Twitter backlash.

Adams and her family were shocked by the blog post, which she has said completely misrepresented the nature of her illness and her reasons for tweeting, was riddled with inaccuracies, and quoted from a private direct message to Keller through Twitter published without permission.

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Washington Post’s reader representative leaves

Media Matters for America

Doug Feaver has left his position as The Washington Post’s “reader representative,” Joe Strupp reports. Editorial Page Editor Fred Hiatt tells Strupp “the Post is still considering whether or how Feaver will be replaced, saying that Feaver’s deputy, Alison Coglianese ‘may assume the role.’ ”

Last March, Post Publisher Katharine Weymouth said the paper would eliminate its ombudsman position: “We know that media writers inside and outside The Post will continue to hold us accountable for what we write,” she said. … Read more

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NPR Headquarters

NPR ombud’s latest report raises important questions, but it’s not without flaws

The modern ombudsman has been a prominent fixture in several of the largest American newsrooms since The New York Times instituted its public editor in the wake of the Jayson Blair debacle a decade ago.

While the position itself has been controversial among journalism leaders, newsrooms that contract with an ombudsman signal to their audience that they take their work seriously enough to open themselves up to independent critique.

Every ombudsman worth his (or her, but most of them have been men) tenure produces a few particularly noteworthy reports or analyses during his tenure.

In 2004, Daniel Okrent took a look at The New York Times’ failure on weapons of mass destruction and did a very smart examination of whether The New York Times was liberal.… Read more

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NPR Headquarters

Do errors in NPR piece merit an 80-page report?

NPR

NPR Ombudsman Edward Schumacher-Matos’ massive report on an investigative series NPR broadcast in 2011 “sets up an unfair challenge to NPR,” Poynter’s Kelly McBride tells NPR’s David Folkenflik.

“Because, if he wants to do a column about why they chose this story instead of that story, then he should do that column. But he essentially does both in this very long report.”

NPR’s top news management “recused themselves from the preparation of this article about the dispute between the network and the ombudsman over the investigative series,” Folkenflik writes. The reporters and editors behind the series “declined to respond on the record to most of the points” in Schumacher-Matos’ report, he wrote. “NPR stands by the stories,” Kinsey Wilson (who is on Poynter’s board of trustees) and Margaret Low Smith wrote in an editors’ note.… Read more

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NPR Headquarters

NPR stands by story its ombudsman criticized

NPR
There are six chapters of NPR Ombudsman Edward Schumacher-Matos’ epic examination of Laura Sullivan and Amy Walters’ October 2011 investigation about foster care in South Dakota.

The series won awards but was also criticized by the state’s governor and head of its Department of Social Services. “Many South Dakota residents also have written me in disapproval of it,” Schumacher-Matos writes. “My finding is that the series was deeply flawed and should not have been aired as it was,” Schumacher-Matos writes. He lists the story’s “five sins”:

1. No proof for its main allegations of wrongdoing;
2. Unfair tone in communicating these unproven allegations;
3. Factual errors, shaky anecdotes and misleading use of data by quietly switching what was being measured;
4. Incomplete reporting and lack of critical context;
5.

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Robert Lipstye

New ESPN ombud Robert Lipsyte talks about his role

Ask if Robert Lipsyte is going to be particularly critical as ESPN’s new ombudsman, and he mentions a little piece he penned for Slate magazine back in June 2011. The piece dismantles the 763-page oral history of ESPN, “Those Guys Have All the Fun.”

In that review, Lipsyte — who once worked on ESPN’s SportsCentury and Classic Sports Reporters shows, among many prestigious sports journalism jobs — criticized the authors for not being tough enough on the Worldwide Leader in Sports.

Why didn’t they look at how ESPN’s cheerleading affected America’s perception of celebrity athlete, or its problems covering athletes it also pays? (“The phrase ‘conflict of interest’ seems flabby,” he wrote then.)

Robert Lipstye

Turns out, when top ESPN executive John A. Walsh called to ask if he would be interested in the job, Lipsyte eventually sent him that column — which also indirectly called Walsh “controlling,” “Machiavellian” and “a genius.”

It was an example of the type of work he’d be doing as the outlet’s fifth ombudsman; an independent columnist who reviews ESPN’s journalism on ESPN’s website.… Read more

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Earns Washington Post

New Washington Post reader representative explains why he won’t be the paper’s ombud

Doug Feaver has no illusions about his new job.

“My primary mission is to respond to readers,” says the Washington Post’s new reader representative.

In other words, he is not an ombudsman.

“This is different — I’m not [charged with] holding the newsroom accountable,” he said in a recent phone interview, adding that “if there were some very difficult subjects that come up, or some obvious matter, I would try to explain how it happened and do the reporting with who is involved, but I wouldn’t be doing what the previous ombudsman was doing.”

Doug Feaver

Feaver started his career at the Post in 1969 and held many roles over the course of 36 years, including washingtonpost.com executive editor. He at one point wrote the Post’s dot.comments blog, which highlighted reader feedback and discussion.… Read more

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Reading the newspaper

Washington Post appoints its first ‘reader representative’

Washington Post
Doug Feaver “will serve as an advocate for readers, responding to their questions and concerns,” the Post announced today.

Doug Feaver

Feaver was a career Postie — a reporter and editor for 29 years on the Business, Metro and National desks. He then became executive editor of washingtonpost.com in 1998 and retired in 2005. He stayed involved for a few more years with a blog called dot.comments that responded to reader comments on the site.

The Post just ended its ombudsman program, replacing it with this new reader representative. Unlike Patrick Pexton and other Post ombudsmen of the past, the reader rep is a Post employee (not an independent contractor) and will not have a regular weekly print column.

It seems the primary outlet of expression for Feaver and assistant reader representative Alison Coglianese will be a blog on washingtonpost.com.… Read more

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