Articles about "Paywalls"


‘Traffic is great today’ at The New Yorker

How did The New Yorker arrive at the number of articles that will trigger its new metered paywall, which debuted today? It observed you cheapskates who gorged on its content for free all summer.

“We studied reader patterns,” newyorker.com Editor Nicholas Thompson said in a phone call. There was no magic spot, just “what seemed fair and what felt right.” Plus they looked at how people arrived on those pages.

“It’s hard, right, because of the way we read the Internet right now,” he said. “A large percentage of traffic is people who only read one or two stories a month.” Traffic to The New Yorker’s homepage is up, Thompson said, but phones and tablets now deliver about 50 percent of its total traffic.

Story No. 7 looked like the inflection point, the spot at which serious readers would lift their credit cards and commit.

A digital- or print-only subscription to The New Yorker costs $60 per year, and an all-access pass costs $70 (there’s a $1 per week promotion for the first 12 weeks, so you can nibble away at that a little). Read more

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NYT corrected Gary Hart story after source’s recollection changed

Good morning. Thanks, veterans. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. NYT corrects Gary Hart story

    Former Miami Herald reporter Tom Fiedler disputes the chronology he gave Matt Bai about when he saw Gary Hart's challenge to prove his infidelity. "Therefore, it is likely that the original version of this article, based in large part on Fiedler’s account, referred incorrectly to the point at which any of the Herald journalists first saw the Times article quoting Hart as saying, 'Follow me around,'" the correction reads. "The text has been adjusted accordingly." (NYT) | Bai: "I find it particularly disturbing that Fiedler, someone I'd very much admired, has now invented a new version of events after repeatedly and recently reconfirming his own longstanding account, which is something we as journalists often condemn in the people we cover." (HuffPost)

  2. Journalists and lawyers: A special legal mini-roundup

    ACLU sues St. Louis County police on behalf of Bilgin Şaşmaz, a Turkish journalist arrested in Ferguson in August.

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Fox News crushed competitors on election night

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Fox News beat broadcast networks on election night

    It also crushed in 2010, the last Republican wave. (NYT) | "Fox News is normally the dominant player in cable news, but its high ratings on Tuesday may have been partly influenced by the nature of the 2014 electorate." (Politico) | Related: "Think of the GOP’s Senate takeover as a full-employment act for Washington reporters," Jack Shafer writes. (Reuters)

  2. Earnings season update

    News Corp saw overall revenues rise, but ad revenue at its print newspapers fell 7 percent over the same period the year before. Strong results at its book division (including recently acquired Harlequin) and other businesses drove an overall growth in revenue at the spun-off company. (Capital) | Torstar, which sold Harlequin to News Corp, saw a 7 percent drop in revenue over all.

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Toronto Star plans to drop paywall

Toronto Star | Torstar | The Canadian Press

The Toronto Star “anticipates eliminating the paywall on its www.thestar.com website next year,” parent company Torstar says in an earnings release. The release says the company plans a new tablet product, developed with La Presse. The Star “will seek to expand its audiences and increase engagement through this and other projects and it anticipates eliminating the paywall in 2015 with some potential impact on circulation revenue,” the release says.

Revenue at Torstar was down 7 percent in the third quarter of 2014, compared to the same period the year before. Its holdings include
Metroland Media Group, which publishes three daily newspapers and many community papers, and the Star Media Group, which publishes the Star and other papers. It sold the book company Harlequin in August for $455 million CAD. Read more

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Brian Kilmeade

‘Fox & Friends’: ‘We are not, we were not’ taking domestic violence lightly

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Program may feature fewer domestic violence jokes: “Fox & Friends” co-hosts Brian Kilmeade and Steve Doocy had a real laff-fest over a video, released by TMZ, that showed the football player battering his then fiancée in an elevator. “I think the message is, take the stairs,” Kilmeade quipped. The program will address the remarks today. (WP) | That address in full:

    Peter King writes about the “lapse in reporting on my part” that led to him writing NFL officials had previously seen the Rice tape. “No one from the league has ever knocked down my report to me, and so I was surprised to see the claim today that league officials have not seen the tape.” (SI) | “At the time, it was important for the NFL to establish that it was taking great pains to investigate the incident.” (Deadspin) | Sally Jenkins: “It simply defies belief that league and team officials couldn’t have seen it if they wanted to.” (WP) | AP has seen a longer version of the video.

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Are you paying too much for the NYT?

The New York Times has introduced three new digital subscription tiers in recent months — and added new benefits to others. So it’s a good time to reevaluate which price point and products are right for you. You might be surprised to find out you’re paying too much for your Times subscription.

I was still under the impression that my Sunday print subscription was the cheapest way for me to also get all the digital benefits I wanted (Nieman Lab’s Joshua Benton wrote about this print subsidization phenomenon a few years back). But it turns out I can get every digital product I actually use for a couple fewer bucks per week — if I’m willing to give up the physical newspaper. Read more

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Missourian paywall is ‘Biggest buzzkill,’ student paper says

The Maneater

The Columbia Missourian’s paywall “makes no sense,” Jill Deutsch writes in University of Missouri student paper The Maneater, dubbing the gate the university’s “Biggest buzzkill” in its Year in Review package.

It makes no sense for journalism students, many of whom are, uh, required to take reporting classes with the Missourian. That means that besides shelling out for those credit hours and providing free labor for a professional newspaper, these students have to pay extra money in order for them (and potential employers) to access their own work.

Professional editors oversee a student staff at the Missourian, which covers the city of Columbia. It launched a paywall in 2012 that charges for articles more than 24 hours old. The paywall, which costs $6 per month, brings in about $40,000 per year, The Maneater reported in January.

Last December the Missouri Students Association requested the Missourian find some way to make the paper free for students, and Missourian GM Dan Potter committed to doing so. Read more

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No paginated articles for members of Slate’s new membership program

Slate | Nieman

Slate’s new membership program Slate Plus launched Monday, and Editor David Plotz reels off some of the premiums in the $5 per month/$50 per year program he says will lead to a “a richer, smoother Slate experience” in his announcement: “special access to favorite Slate writers and editors.” Early access to some features. A really nice-looking mug.

All of which pales compared to the most important benefit: No more paginated articles.

Slate will be sleeker for Slate Plus members. We know how much some of you dislike pagination: Slate Plus members will automatically get single-page articles throughout the site. Members will also be able to read and post comments directly on article pages, rather in a pop-up window, and we’ll highlight member comments.

The membership is not a paywall — all Slate’s content is still free for cheapskates. (Though the idea of eliminating annoyances in exchange for cash may be interesting to publishers no matter how or whether they charge for content — I would consider paying to never see “Read more” followed by a URL when I paste a quote into a blog post.)

Nieman’s Josh Benton writes that Slate Plus’ value “isn’t single-page stories or a pre-show spritzer with Emily Bazelon — it’s just the fact that it’s an opportunity for people willing to pay to do so.”

There are Slate superfans whose relationship with the site stretches more than a decade.

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Why The Seattle Times lowered its paywall during the mudslide — but not completely

The mudslide near Oso, Wash., on March 22 and its aftermath commanded national attention, but one local news organization was in position to own the story.

That meant The Seattle Times had a decision to make: Was its tirelessly produced news about the disaster and the search for survivors so important that it merited a suspension of the website’s year-old paywall?

Yes and no. Read more

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Slate to introduce Amazon Prime-like membership plan

The New York Times

“Slate Plus” will launch Tuesday, Leslie Kaufman reports. While all Slate’s content will remain available for free, readers who pay $5 per month (or $50 per year) will get “special access to the site’s editors and writers, as well as members-only discussions with Emily Yoffe, Slate’s Dear Prudence advice columnist.” They’ll also get input into profiles, ad-free podcasts and discounts on events.

“Our model is Amazon Prime, which keeps adding benefits,” Slate Editor David Plotz told Kaufman.

In late 2012, Jeff Bercovici reported Slate might be considering a paywall. (The company tried one long ago but didn’t think it worked.) Paywalls “don’t make sense for a site like ours,” Weisberg told me at the time. He did say Slate was looking at a membership model. Read more

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