Articles about "Paywalls"


nyt-building-v-small

Are you paying too much for the NYT?

The New York Times has introduced three new digital subscription tiers in recent months — and added new benefits to others. So it’s a good time to reevaluate which price point and products are right for you. You might be surprised to find out you’re paying too much for your Times subscription.

I was still under the impression that my Sunday print subscription was the cheapest way for me to also get all the digital benefits I wanted (Nieman Lab’s Joshua Benton wrote about this print subsidization phenomenon a few years back). But it turns out I can get every digital product I actually use for a couple fewer bucks per week — if I’m willing to give up the physical newspaper.… Read more

Tools:
2 Comments

Missourian paywall is ‘Biggest buzzkill,’ student paper says

The Maneater

The Columbia Missourian’s paywall “makes no sense,” Jill Deutsch writes in University of Missouri student paper The Maneater, dubbing the gate the university’s “Biggest buzzkill” in its Year in Review package.

It makes no sense for journalism students, many of whom are, uh, required to take reporting classes with the Missourian. That means that besides shelling out for those credit hours and providing free labor for a professional newspaper, these students have to pay extra money in order for them (and potential employers) to access their own work.

Professional editors oversee a student staff at the Missourian, which covers the city of Columbia. It launched a paywall in 2012 that charges for articles more than 24 hours old. The paywall, which costs $6 per month, brings in about $40,000 per year, The Maneater reported in January.… Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

No paginated articles for members of Slate’s new membership program

Slate | Nieman

Slate’s new membership program Slate Plus launched Monday, and Editor David Plotz reels off some of the premiums in the $5 per month/$50 per year program he says will lead to a “a richer, smoother Slate experience” in his announcement: “special access to favorite Slate writers and editors.” Early access to some features. A really nice-looking mug.

All of which pales compared to the most important benefit: No more paginated articles.

Slate will be sleeker for Slate Plus members. We know how much some of you dislike pagination: Slate Plus members will automatically get single-page articles throughout the site. Members will also be able to read and post comments directly on article pages, rather in a pop-up window, and we’ll highlight member comments.

Read more
Tools:
0 Comments
seattletimesfeatured

Why The Seattle Times lowered its paywall during the mudslide — but not completely

The mudslide near Oso, Wash., on March 22 and its aftermath commanded national attention, but one local news organization was in position to own the story.

That meant The Seattle Times had a decision to make: Was its tirelessly produced news about the disaster and the search for survivors so important that it merited a suspension of the website’s year-old paywall?

Yes and no.… Read more

Tools:
4 Comments

Slate to introduce Amazon Prime-like membership plan

The New York Times

“Slate Plus” will launch Tuesday, Leslie Kaufman reports. While all Slate’s content will remain available for free, readers who pay $5 per month (or $50 per year) will get “special access to the site’s editors and writers, as well as members-only discussions with Emily Yoffe, Slate’s Dear Prudence advice columnist.” They’ll also get input into profiles, ad-free podcasts and discounts on events.

“Our model is Amazon Prime, which keeps adding benefits,” Slate Editor David Plotz told Kaufman.

In late 2012, Jeff Bercovici reported Slate might be considering a paywall. (The company tried one long ago but didn’t think it worked.) Paywalls “don’t make sense for a site like ours,” Weisberg told me at the time. He did say Slate was looking at a membership model.… Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

Guardian builds a business around ‘snacking’

Journalism.co.uk | CJR | PressGazette

Guardian CEO Andrew Miller told attendees of the Digital Media Strategies conference in London that his publication doesn’t assume readers stay with one news source all day long, Rachel Bartlett reports. Keeping the doors to its journalism open, Miller said, means a big audience outside the publication’s native U.K. And indeed the Guardian recently reported double-digit growth in digital revenue.

“The reality of the world is that people snack,” he said, and the Guardian approach is to “build a business around that”, he added.

Miller said entities that refer traffic to the Guardian “aren’t our enemies, these are our friends.” He said it’s “essential to our business model to ensure our journalism is read,” Bartlett reports.

“This isn’t about trying to protect old business models.

Read more
Tools:
0 Comments

From Lucia Moses’ profile of Hearst CEO Steve Swartz:

While many newspapers have turned to paywalls to offset declining ad revenue, Hearst has clung to free access. Some see this as lacking innovation, but Swartz counters that Hearst chose to place its bets on household penetration and that its free newspaper sites are profitable without paywalls. “If you put a gate on your free website, you’re giving up a powerful tool to reach the consumer, and we think that’s a better strategy than putting up a paywall,” he says.

Lucia Moses, Adweek

Tools:
0 Comments

Sun-Times will test Bitcoin paywall

The Domains

The Chicago Sun-Times will test a “social paywall” Feb. 1. To access the site, “readers will be prompted to donate Bitcoins to or Tweet about the Taproot Foundation,” a group that says it “makes business talent available to organizations working to improve society.”

Sun-Times Editor-in-Chief and Publisher Jim Kirk said the Sun-Times is the “first major USA newspaper to test a Bitcoin-based paywall.” The Dish Daily implemented a paywall built by the same company, BitWall, last year.

The Sun-Times erected a more traditional metered paywall in 2011.

Related: News nonprofit starts taking donations in BitcoinRead more

Tools:
0 Comments

Cincinnati TV station plans paywall on its website

NetNewsCheck

WCPO will introduce a paywall for much of its website content early next year, NetNewsCheck reports.

Over the past year, the ABC affiliate’s site has added more than 30 editorial staffers to its digital reporting team, including eight veteran reporters covering local crime and justice, politics, business, education and the arts.

Paywalls are increasingly common for newspaper sites — 41 percent of U.S. dailies will have them after Digital First Media puts its paywalls in place, Ken Doctor wrote recently — but they’re an elusive species among TV stations, which could arguably benefit from competitors putting their content behind a gate.

The Cincinnati Enquirer, like all Gannett-owned papers, has a metered paywall. The E.W. Scripps Co., which owns WCPO, announced at the end of 2012 it would install paywalls for all of its newspaper sites.… Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

Salt Lake Tribune won’t get a paywall because of competition

Salt Lake Tribune

After Digital First Media CEO John Paton announced Monday that the company would roll out paywalls to “all 75 dailies run by DFM,” the Salt Lake Tribune tweeted to Poynter that its site would remain free:

 

A Digital First Media spokesperson confirmed to Poynter (as did Paton, on Twitter) that the Tribune would stay free. Tribune Editor Terry Orme hasn’t replied to my request for more information, but Managing Editor Lisa Carricaburu explained the exemption in a story on Monday:

We are in a very competitive news market flush with free online access to news. For us to charge for access to sltrib.com and our mobile applications at this time would be to risk losing a significant chunk of audience that easily could find local news somewhere else.

Read more
Tools:
0 Comments