Articles about "Pew Research"


Chart shows how minority employment at newspapers has stalled

Pew

New York Times Executive Editor Dean Baquet is “part of a small minority at U.S. news outlets,” Monica Anderson writes for Pew. “[I]n newspaper newsrooms, the percentage of overall staffers and supervisors who are black, Hispanic, Asian, Native American or multiracial has remained virtually unchanged in the past two decades.” Anderson uses data from the American Society of News Editors census to chart that stagnation:

The percentage of minority journalists in newspaper newsrooms edged up by a miserable .05 percentage points in 2012, even as absolute numbers fell by 300 positions. The decline counts as stagnation because minority journalists lost newspaper jobs at about the same rate as journalists overall.… Read more

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Women journalists make 17% less than men

Pew

The median salary of women journalists is 83 percent of their male counterparts’ pay, Monica Anderson reports for Pew. That’s in line with the national pay gap: “the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics found that median hourly earnings for all women in 2012 amount to 84% of what a man makes,” Anderson writes. Anderson’s report draws on the most recent Indiana University survey of journalists.

Ken Auletta reported Thursday that ousted New York Times Executive Editor Jill Abramson made a $475,000 salary in her first year in the top job. That’s 85 percent of what Auletta reports her predecessor, Bill Keller, was making that year.

Anderson gathers other stats from the annual ASNE census: At newspapers, the percentage of women has “barely budged,” she writes, and the percentage of women in supervisory positions has gone up a whopping 1 percent since 1998.… Read more

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Few say they heard ‘a lot’ about Heartbleed bug from news sources

Pew

Only about 1 in 5 U.S. adults said they’d heard “a lot” about the Heartbleed bug from news sources, Pew reports in a new survey. 60 percent of adults said they’d at least heard about the security flaw in a widely used encryption program, one serious enough that many Web entities urged their customers and users to change their passwords.

The story “registered roughly the same level of public awareness as the U.S.-Iran negotiations and agreement to allow monitoring of Iran’s nuclear program (in November and December 2013) and Catholic Bishops in the U.S. protesting Obama Administration policies they believe restricted religious liberty (July 2012),” Pew writes.

The report lists public awareness of some previous news stories by way of comparison:

  • 88% of Americans said they had heard “a lot” about the Newtown, Connecticut shootings in December 2012.
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News biz revenue has shrunk by a third since 2006

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The news business had about $30 billion more revenue in 2006 than it does today, Pew finds. Advertising’s percentage of that revenue has shrunk markedly, from 82 percent of news business revenue in 2006 — before the recession — to 69 percent today.



Money from audience members now accounts for about a quarter of all revenue, Pew says, as it did in its recent State of the News Media report. Rick Edmonds noted that newspapers still account for about 60 percent of the news business’ revenue, despite their rough decade.

Retransmission fees have bolstered many TV stations’ balance sheets, as has political advertising revenue. That last category may be even more robust in future years after Wednesday’s Supreme Court ruling that struck down a limit on campaign contributions.… Read more

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Pew: More seniors own tablets or e-readers than smartphones

Pew Research Center

About 27 percent of U.S. adults age 65 or older own a tablet or e-reader device while just 18 percent of seniors own a smartphone, according to Pew’s new report on seniors’ digital habits.

That’s the opposite of the pattern seen in all U.S. adults, who own smartphones at a higher rate (55 percent) than tablets or e-readers (43 percent).

All such device use among older adults follows the “elite” patterns seen in the overall adult population, Pew found: More education and higher household income are correlated with higher rates of ownership.

Meanwhile, more seniors embrace the Internet every year, but they continue to lag behind the overall population. Fifty-nine percent of seniors go online, while 86 percent of all U.S. adults do.… Read more

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Growth in online video news consumption slows

Pew Research Center

Despite the recent rapid proliferation of mobile devices, the number of Americans who consume video news online has increased just three percentage points since 2009, from 33 percent to 36 percent in 2013.

An uncertain future for news video on the Web is a key finding in Pew Research Center’s annual State of the News Media report released this morning.

Overall, the number of U.S. adults who view any online video has increased about 20 percent since 2009, before the iPad was introduced, while the number of U.S. adults who view online news video increased just 9 percent. That 9 percent growth over four years represents a significant slowdown from the 27 percent growth observed between 2007 and 2009.

Pew points out that the mobile boom is hardly over.… Read more

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Pew finds embattled newspaper industry still pulls in more than half of all news revenue

Pew’s 11th annual State of the News Media report, out this morning, offers fresh measures of news media revenue and news staffing at digital-only start-ups. Both findings are arresting for those of us in the news-about-news business but also shed light on the well-being of the industry as a whole.

Among the highlights:

  • The Pew research team attempted a revenue estimate for all the branches of the United States news industry it has covered in past reports. The surprising conclusion: Even though newspaper advertising revenue has fallen by half over the last decade, including subscriptions and other revenue, the industry still accounts for $38.6 billion of $63.6 billion in news revenue per year. That is roughly 61 percent of the total.
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Missing plane: Only a third of people think there’s too much coverage

Pew Research Center

Almost half of the people surveyed by Pew think there’s been the right amount of coverage of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370. Thirty-three percent said there was too much coverage and 12 percent — seriously? — said they haven’t heard enough.


It was by far the most-followed story among people Pew surveyed.


Fewer young people followed the story, for what that’s worth. And young people (those between 18-29) were also less likely to be interested in stories about government surveillance, Pew found. Only 14 percent said they were following surveillance stories closely, about the same percentage that was closely following news about Crimea.… Read more

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‘Sideways’ visitors to news sites are less engaged, Pew finds

Pew

People who visit a news organization’s website directly engage with its content more than those who enter “sideways,” according to a new study by the Pew Research Journalism Project. People arriving via Facebook and search stay a shorter time and view fewer pages. Pew’s data “suggest that turning social media or search eyeballs into equally dedicated readers is no easy task,” Amy Mitchell, Mark Jurkowitz and Kenneth Olmstead write.

That finding was consistent across the 26 news websites whose comScore data Pew examined, even BuzzFeed and NPR.org, “which have an unusually high level of Facebook traffic,” the report says.… Read more

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Millennials: Have more Facebook friends, share more selfies

Pew

Millennials, Pew reports, “are relatively unattached to organized politics and religion, linked by social media, burdened by debt, distrustful of people, in no rush to marry— and optimistic about the future.”

Which is all well and good, but where do they stand on selfies?



But if you remember “The Downward Spiral”‘s original release date (20 years ago Saturday), you’re not just less likely to post selfies, you probably have fewer Facebook friends than younger people.



Pew reported last year that publishers’ brands meant little to people who consumed news on Facebook — they were far more likely to click on something recommended by a friend.

But, Pew writes in this new report: “amidst their fervent embrace of all things digital, nine-in-ten Millennials say people generally share too much information about themselves online, a view held by similarly lopsided proportions of all older generations.”… Read more

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