Articles about "Pew Research"


58% of US adults say they have a smartphone — and other sobering stats from Pew

Pew Research Center

As an online journalist I think it’s sometimes easy to forget that the mobile revolution hasn’t put a smartphone in the pocket of every American yet. Read more

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Women more likely to report kindness on the Internet than men

Pew

Women “are more likely than men to have been treated kindly (74% vs. 66%)” on the Internet, a Pew survey released Thursday says. “There were not statistically significant differences between online women and men when it comes to being treated unkindly or attacked by someone online.”

People under 29 were more likely to report seeing both good and awful behavior online, and those over 65 “were the most likely to say people were mostly kind—85% of them said so.”

Those findings are part of Pew’s rolling report on the Web’s 25th birthday — Sir Tim Berners-Lee wrote a paper in 1989 proposing a distributed, hypertext-based system for sharing information.

A strong majority of Internet users surveyed by Pew say people online are “mostly kind.” Please feel free to attack these findings (or me for sharing them!) using whichever Internet platform you prefer.

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Teenagers don’t use social media to share links, says Microsoft researcher

Fast Company

In a conversation with Evie Nagy, Microsoft Research Principal Researcher danah boyd talks about how teens use social media. It’s not the same way grown-ups do:

My adult Twitter experience is more of people using it for professional communication or news sharing or brand building or comedy. How do teens use Twitter differently, and what do adults need to understand most?

The first thing you would notice if you were following teenagers is that you would not see very many links. Which is radically different than our world. They’re doing a lot of interacting and engaging around celebrities, pop culture, really funny trending topics that they think are interesting, I’m sure you’ve seen some of the crazy hashtags. And of course with Instagram, hashtags have become even stronger on Twitter. Hashtags are content in and of themselves. I’m not sure if you saw that SNL sketch that was like ‘hashtag, how are you today?,’ etc. There’s a degree to which this is kind of true when you look at teen content. They’re also more likely to have protected accounts, and use it to talk to a small group of their actual friends. To them Facebook is everyone they ever knew, and Twitter is something they’ve locked down to just a handful of people they care about–which is often the opposite of how adults use them.

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Pew study shows local TV news still the ‘top news source’

Pew Research Center

Local TV news continues to be the leading news source for Americans, according to a study released Tuesday by Pew Research Center, “with almost three out of four U.S. adults (71%) watching local television news, compared with 65% viewing network newscasts and 38% cable news over the course of a month, according to our analysis of Nielsen data from February 2013.”

In the study, Katerina Eva Matsa wrote that audiences for the three main time slots for local news grew. Even including numbers from 2013, however, the overall numbers for local TV news is down about 3 percent since 2007. Big news events during November of last year may also explain the higher numbers for 2013, Matsa wrote. Read more

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About a fifth of Facebook and Twitter users often get news from newspapers, too

Pew

21 percent of Facebook users and 18 percent of Twitter users tell the Pew Research Journalism Project they get news “often” from print newspapers. The organization continues to look at how social media users get news.

YouTube, LinkedIn and Google Plus news consumers are more likely than Facebook and Twitter news consumers to watch cable news. Twitter news consumers are among the least likely to turn to local and cable TV. And nearly four-in-ten LinkedIn news consumers listen to news on the radio, compared to about a quarter of the general population.

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Few people frequently turn to Twitter for breaking news

CNBC | Pew

Sixteen percent of Twitter users “say they turn to Twitter frequently for breaking news,” a poll by Associated Press and CNBC says. “That said, 44 percent of users do so at least some of the time.” And yet far fewer Americans get news from Twitter (8 percent) than from Facebook (30 percent), separate analysis the Pew Research Center released Monday says.

Forty-five percent of those who use Twitter to get news are 18-29 years old — more than the 30 percent of Twitter users overall who are in that demographic, Pew previously reported. Both organizations found a similar number of Americans use the service — one in five, CNBC-AP finds, 16 percent, Pew says.

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News remains "incidental" on Facebook, according to a recent Pew Research Center report.

News organizations’ brands matter little to Facebook users, study finds

Pew

A third of Americans get news from Facebook, a new study from Pew Research Center says. But 80 percent of the people who get news on Facebook get it when they’re on Facebook for other reasons.

Only 20 percent of people who told Pew they click on links inside Facebook posts said they did so because they prefer the news organization that produced the story. Nearly twice as many said a friend’s recommendation was important, and half said they clicked because a story looked surprising, funny or entertaining. Read more

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Pew: TV is ‘the dominant way that Americans get news at home’

Pew Research Center

American adults continue to watch TV more than any other news source at home, with the highest percentage watching local news, the Pew Research Center reported Friday.

In a study of Nielsen data covering February 2013, researchers found 71 percent of U.S. adults had watched local newscasts and 65 percent watched network news over the span of the month. And while only 38 percent of adults watched cable news, those viewers spent twice as much time doing so than viewers of local or network broadcasts.

The Nielsen data, specially prepared for the Pew study, is based on the rating service’s panel of metered homes during the important February “sweeps” period. The findings are similar to that reported in previous Pew studies showing television remains the most popular platform for Americans consuming the news.

Related: One-third of millennials watch mostly online video or no broadcast TV | Pew surveys of audience habits suggest perilous future for news| Nearly one-third of U.S. adults have abandoned a news outlet due to dissatisfaction | Pew: Half of Americans get news digitally, topping newspapers, radio Read more

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Third of millennials watch mostly online video or no broadcast TV

Thirty-four percent of millennials surveyed watch mostly online video or no broadcast television, new research from The New York Times says.

Brian Brett, the Times’ executive director of customer research, is scheduled to present the research at the INMA Audience Summit in Las Vegas Thursday. Read more

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Pew surveys of audience habits suggest perilous future for news

News organizations have been confronting the problem of a shrinking audience for more than a decade, but trends strongly suggest that these difficulties may only worsen over time. Today’s younger and middle-aged audience seems unlikely to ever match the avid news interest of the generations they will replace, even as they enthusiastically transition to the Internet as their principal source of news.

Pew Research longitudinal surveys find that Gen Xers (33-47 years old) and Millennials (18-31 years old), who spent less time than older people following the news at the outset of their adulthood, have so far shown little indication that that they will become heavier news consumers as they age.

Notably, a 2012 Pew Research national poll found members of the Silent generation (67-84 years old) spending 84 minutes watching, reading or listening to the news the day before the survey interview. Boomers (48-66 years old), did not lag far behind (77 minutes), but Xers and Millennials spent much less time: 66 minutes and 46 minutes, respectively.

The truly troubling trend for the media is that Pew Research surveys give little indication that news consumption increases among members of the younger age groups as they get older. For example, in 2004 Xers reported following the news about as often as they did in 2012 (63 minutes versus 66 minutes). The eight-year trend for Millennials was equally flat (43 minutes versus 46 minutes).

Younger generations just don’t enjoy following news

The relatively modest levels of news consumption among the younger generations may be the result of any number of factors – more activities that compete with following the news, fewer compelling major historical events during childhood and adolescence, and so forth. But a critical factor that emerges from the surveys is that older people simply enjoy the news more than the young do. The Pew Research Center’s latest surveys find 58 percent of Silents and Boomers reporting they enjoy following the news a lot, compared to 45% of Xers and just 29 percent of Millennials. This generational difference has been consistently apparent in the surveys over the years.

The audience for newspapers among younger Americans has been modest from the outset of their adulthood, and has not increased as these people have matured. In fact, as they have gotten older Xers and Millennials have become even less inclined to read newspapers.

While much has been made about the potential appeal, especially to younger audiences, of reading newspapers on digital devices such as iPhones, iPads and Kindles, such readership is modest (8 percent and 6 percent respectively) among both Millennials and Xers, and has done little to offset declines in newspaper readership among these groups in recent years.

Television news viewership is markedly lower among younger age groups compared to older people, with no sign of it increasing as Xers and Millennials age. However, unlike newspapers, there is little indication that this TV news viewership declines with age.

In sharp contrast, Xers and Millennials have increasingly turned to the Internet for news as they have gotten older. Among Xers the Internet news audience jumped from 29 percent to 49 percent between 2004 and 2012. It now matches turning to TV for news, which also declined (by 20 percentage points over this period). Similar patterns are apparent among Millennials, but they are more extreme. More of those born between 1982 and 1995 (43 percent) now turn to the Internet for news than to TV (35 percent).

Radio is the traditional news source that has held its own the best among the younger cohorts as they have aged. Fully 38 percent of Xers say they got news from radio “yesterday” and 27 percent of Millennials said the same. Both measures are little changed since the middle of the last decade.

Older Americans’ habits show little change

The percentage of Silents and Boomers who turn to TV for news has not declined since the mid 1990s, when we first began these surveys. In fact, as Boomers have aged a growing percentage have turned to TV for news. Strikingly, many fewer Silents and Boomers get news from radio than they did in the mid-1990s.

The surveys indicate much more change with respect to newspaper readership. The percentage of Boomers who “read a paper yesterday” is much lower today than it was in the mid-1990s – 49 percent in 1996 versus 36 percent in 2012. Digital newspapers are read by minuscule numbers of Silents (3 percent) and Boomers (6 percent). But Silents stand out as heavy consumers of newspapers — every bit as much as they were in the mid-1990s.

Over the years, only modest numbers of Boomers and Silents have adopted the Internet as a source of news — 23 percent and 35 percent, respectively.

For all the potential bad news for the traditional news media, social media looms as a potential booster of news consumption among the younger generation, albeit a modest one so far. Pew Research’s 2012 survey found a third of Millennials and 20 percent of Xers saying they regularly see news or news headlines on social-networking sites. However, only about 35 percent of those who get news from social network sites say they follow up and seek out full news stories.

News organizations clearly and correctly see digital readership as vital to their future. But again, this data suggests that expectations have to be modest with respect to regaining the huge audience the media once enjoyed. The raw material — high levels of news engagement among the younger generations — just has not been there, at least for now.

Andrew Kohut is the Founding Director of the Pew Research Center, in Washington, D.C.

Correction: A paragraph about news consumption increasing among members of  younger age groups as they get older has been updated to reflect more accurate figures. Read more

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