Articles about "phone hacking"


News Corp’s revenue falls

News Corp

Revenue at News Corp’s news and information division fell 6 percent in the last quarter of the corporation’s fiscal year, and 9 percent in the full year, when compared with the respective same periods the year before.

“The majority of the revenue decline reflects lower advertising revenues at the News and Information Services segment, the sale of LMG and foreign currency fluctuations, partially offset by strong performance in the Book Publishing and Digital Real Estate Services segments,” the company says in an earnings release. “LMG” refers to Dow Jones’ Local Media Group, which the company sold last September.

Overall revenue was down 3 percent in the fourth quarter and 4 percent for the year. Circulation and subscription revenues were down 5 percent in the year, the report says.… Read more

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Google protesters arrested; what @SavedYouAClick won’t do

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Net neutrality protesters reportedly arrested at Google HQ: Valleywag’s Nitasha Tiku and TechCrunch’s Natasha Lomas report that members of a group called Occupy Google were arrested outside Google’s Mountain View, California, headquarters early this morning. (Valleywag; TechCrunch)
  2. Source spot: New York Times Public Editor Margaret Sullivan draws a line between “serious and valid use of confidentiality” and anonymity granted for sources relaying “what is often, in essence, officially approved government communication, or for promoting their own political agenda.” (NYT)
  3. Phone-hacking stories you might actually want to read: The criminal case against several former News Corp employees “is not the final word on whether either editor, News Corp., or much of the British tabloid press has betrayed the principles of journalism,” Ken Auletta writes.
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Online publications not sure how British regulatory scheme will affect them

The Guardian | politics.co.uk | The New York Times
Bloggers and online publishers aren’t clear on how a proposed press-regulation scheme in Great Britain will affect them, Lisa O’Carroll reports. The proposed law — which could lead to high libel fines for bloggers — defines “a website containing news-related material (whether or not related to a newspaper or magazine)” as a “relevant publisher” subject to regulation and orders of damages.

Cabinet member Maria Miller told Parliament “the new rules were designed to protect ‘small-scale bloggers,’” O’Carroll writes.

[I]t is hard to envisage a workable definition of a news site, whether it be by staff numbers, content or location of servers,” Ian Dunt writes in politics.co.uk. He also reports that several publishers are considering boycotting the scheme.… Read more

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As BBC strikes, Brits trust journalists less than Americans do

Ipsos MORI | International Herald Tribune | The Drum | Associated Press
Good news for British journalists: At least you’re not politicians. Those public servants were the only group trusted less by Britons than members of the press, according to an Ipsos MORI poll published Friday. Only 21 percent of adults in Britain trust journalists to tell the truth; 72 percent do not trust them. Even members of parliament in general did better than journos (23 percent trust them to tell the truth) despite their proven ability to put together scandals like a recent one involving a speeding ticket, a spurned wife and … oh yeah, a journalist.… Read more

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I visited the Leveson Inquiry on ‘the dullest day yet’

It seemed an inspired idea: Stroll just a few minutes down the road and observe part of that morning’s Leveson Inquiry at London’s Royal Courts of Justice.

What could be better than absorbing an important bit of press history by attending a public inquiry into the “culture, practices and ethics” of the British press?

This, I thought to myself as I walked along The Strand yesterday, is how you really #partylikeajournalist in a foreign city.

“Right,” said the woman at the information desk when I asked for directions to the Leveson media tent. “Walk straight to the end of the main hallway through the two arches — you can of course choose which one to go through — then turn to the right and walk to the end of the hallway.… Read more

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Dow Jones President Todd Larsen steps down

Todd Larsen has resigned as president of Dow Jones & Co., says a company press release. Larsen was touted as a potential replacement for Les Hinton, who resigned as CEO of Dow Jones last July, saying he wasn’t aware of the phone-hacking that went on when he was executive chairman of News International, which like Dow Jones is owned by News Corp. “That I was ignorant of what apparently happened is irrelevant and in the circumstances I feel it is proper for me to resign from News Corp, and apologize to those hurt by the actions of the News of the World,” Hinton wrote in his resignation letter. Hinton resigned the same day Rebekah Brooks resigned the top spot at News International.

Larsen enjoyed a special status within the company’s upper reaches at the time: He’d been there more than a decade, so he wasn’t an outsider, nor was he a Murdoch crony.… Read more

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A New York Times correction notes The Daily News did cover the parliamentary hacking report issued this week in the U.K.:

An article on Wednesday about Colin Myler, former editor of The News of the World and current editor of The Daily News, who has become part of the hacking scandal story at┬áRupert Murdoch’s British newspapers, described incorrectly Daily News coverage on Tuesday about a parliamentary report on the scandal. The Daily News’s Web site did indeed publish information about the report, an article by The Associated Press; it is not the case that the Web site published ”nothing.”

The New York Times

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