Articles about "Photo Errors"


Man sues GateHouse paper over photo error and ‘meaningless and failed’ correction

This story starts with two men, both named Angel Ortiz.

One was indicted for raping a child, among other offenses, in December. The other wasn’t — but the MetroWest Daily News of Framingham, Mass., used his photo in its story about the other Angel Ortiz.

Yes, a big mistake. It’s also exactly the type of error I highlighted in a recent post offering advice on how to avoid photo mix-ups.

This incident is made even more egregious because the paper published the story — with the wrong photo — on its front page. After being informed of the mistake, MetroWest Daily News removed the image from its website and published a correction in the next edition of the paper, on page two. (The online version of the article does not include the correction.)

The paper’s action’s did not satisfy the wrong Mr. Ortiz, who filed suit against the GateHouse Media publication February 1, according to a report by Framingham Patch. Read more

Tools:
2 Comments

5 tips for getting photo IDs right

Mistaken identifications are among the most common photo errors I see corrected by the media. People in photos have either been mislabeled internally or by a photo or wire service, or someone hasn’t checked the image to verify it’s showing who they think it does.

A case in point: this Monday correction in The Independent

In our print edition of Friday 3 February we ran a photograph of an actor named David Bradley under the heading “stars who have slipped.” We very much regret that we used a photograph of the wrong David Bradley and that the David Bradley we pictured is still enjoying a highly successful career, including playing Argus Filch, the caretaker in the Harry Potter films.

This is a bit tricky, as the photo was in fact of an actor named David Bradley — it was just the wrong David Bradley.

Then there are other photo mistakes that on their face seem less clear and forgivable. Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

A photo mixup at The Daily Mirror killed the wrong man:

DUE to an error in yesterday’s report concerning the fatal shooting of Alan McNally, the photograph on page 1 purporting to depict the late Alan McNally was in fact of another man who is not involved in any of the matters referred to in the report.

We apologise for the error and for any confusion caused as a result.

We are happy to correct the position.

The Daily Mirror (U.K.)

Tools:
0 Comments
bbchoax

Interview with a hoaxster: How I fooled the Daily Mail with fake pic

Jody Kirton didn’t set out to fool the press, he just got lucky.

As detailed by the great Tabloid Watch blog, an image created by Kirton ended up forming the basis of a story on the Daily Mail’s website. Here’s the image in question:

Looks pretty authentic, yes? Well the image of a snow-covered road and cars never aired on the BBC, wasn’t taken in Lutterworth, and it certainly wasn’t submitted by anyone with the name Shanda Lear. (Chandelier, anyone?)

Kirton, a truck driver and photographer, created the image in Photoshop and then made it look like it had been on TV. After the Mail somehow discovered the image, it published a story headlined, “Not a name to make light of! BBC News shows picture taken by viewer called Shanda Lear.” It began:

It was meant to draw attention to the heavy snowfall which has started to blanket parts of the UK.

Read more
Tools:
3 Comments
RadioTimes

UK’s Radio Times apologizes for photo showing Royal Marine’s little soldier

Here’s a reminder to make sure you inspect handout photos for any, um, irregularities.

UK listings publication Radio Times issued an apology after it accidentally published a photo of a group of Royal Marines that showed one man’s penis. The story was about a documentary airing on Channel 5, and the photo was provided by that organization’s PR department.

A censored version of the photo, via the Radio Times website, is below. From the apology:

It has come to our attention that an apparently innocent photo of the Royal Marines’ 42 Commando unit – printed by Radio Times in good faith and issued by Channel 5’s publicity department to promote the documentary Royal Marines: Mission Afghanistan – contains the sight of one of the marines playing a prank.

“I know that British soldiers serving in Afghanistan are well equipped, but seeing the roll call of Royal Marines gives the expression a whole new meaning,” wrote one reader in a letter to RT this morning.

Read more
Tools:
7 Comments

ON Friday 30 December 2011, as part of an article concerning a drugs test investigation at Hull FC, we published a picture of a man we said was Ben Cooper who has been suspended for his role in the affair.

In fact the picture was of Stuart Donlan, the assistant coach of Castleford Tigers, who has never been involved in any way with any drugs testing incident. The photo was supplied by an agency. We offer Stuart Donlan, his family and friends our sincere apologies.

An apology from the Daily Mirror

Tools:
0 Comments

Attorney Scott Tenley was misidentified as Emanuel Goffer in a photo caption accompanying the continuation of an article on the government’s broad insider-trading investigation in Wednesday’s Money & Investing section. The person who was supposed to be pictured, Mr. Goffer, is a figure who was convicted in the case. Mr. Tenley is a lawyer for another figure in the case and his photo appeared in error.

A correction in the Wall Street Journal

Tools:
2 Comments

A prominent photograph showed – according to the caption – “the five men originally charged with Stephen Lawrence’s murder being pelted with eggs after giving evidence at a public inquiry.” Only four of the six men shown in the picture – a crowd scene from June 1998 – were charged in the Lawrence case. For the avoidance of doubt: the man most prominently shown in the foreground of the shot, wearing spectacles and a blue shirt, was not among the accused, nor was a sixth man shown in the photo’s rear (4 January, page 7).

A correction in The Guardian

Tools:
0 Comments

An archive photo showed a famous woman — aproned, holding a saucepan and contemplating several wine glasses — in a galley kitchen (Ironing lady, 30 December, page 10). Our caption read: “Margaret Thatcher, as PM, attends to domestic concerns at 10 Downing Street.” In fact, notes a reader, “the photo shows almost the opposite: it’s a publicity still from a BBC TV series called ‘Take Nobody’s Word For It. ‘ ” The reader, who worked on this 1987 series, goes on: “Mrs Thatcher is appearing as a ‘guest scientist’ doing kitchen chemistry experiments; she’s explaining that red cabbage can be used as an indicator for acid and alkali, and she’s about to pour the red cabbage water from the saucepan . . . into the wine glasses with acid, alkali and neutral liquids in them, to show the colour changes.”

A correction in The Guardian

Tools:
0 Comments
Page 2 of 212