Articles about "Photojournalism"


UK’s first female photojournalist honored

PetaPixel | Museum of London | The Guardian | Library of Congress
Christina Broom, who died in 1939, was Britain's first female photojournalist and the documenter of life before, during and after World War I. She also got a late start, the Museum of London's Anna Sparham wrote Friday.
It was with the fast approaching centenary of the First World War that we considered this acquisition for the museum. Broom photographed between 1904 and 1939 and saw the war through her photography of the soldiers going to and returning from the Front as well as documenting London before, during and after that time. From the outset however I also wanted to focus on this work of a woman photographer; a woman who was unique, intriguing, skilled and largely underappreciated, her story not yet being widely told. That Broom was 40 when she taught herself photography, and that her daughter Winifred made all the prints, is in itself a great story opener.
On Friday, April 4, the Museum of London opened a small display of Broom's photography, with a bigger display planned for the future. Broom's images include one of Rudyard Kipling's son, Jack, who died in the war and inspired the poem "My Boy Jack," Mark Brown reported in The Guardian, as well as images of the royal family and soldiers with their families.
The collection shows that Broom was a witness to the key moments of early 20th century life in London including being one of only two people allowed to photograph Edward VII lying in state. Her photographs were used extensively by newspapers including the Daily Sketch, Sunday Herald and Evening News, always with the credit Mrs Alfred Broom. Sparham said the images had strength and relevance in their own right but "it is the photographer's own fascinating story of determination and entrepreneurialism that makes them truly come alive".
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PoynterVision: War zone photographers a breed apart

Associated Press photographer Anja Niedringhaus’ death in Afghanistan serves as another reminder of the deadly calling that war photography can be. Recently, Afghanistan has become a dangerous assignment “on par with the height of the Iraq war or the current … Read more

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APTOPIX Afghanistan Election

Anja Niedringhaus: Covering war ‘is the essence of journalism’

AP photographer Anja Niedringhaus was killed Friday in Afghanistan. In her 2012 book "At War," she wrote about her work, and Nieman Reports shared some of her words: "For me, covering conflict and war is the essence of journalism," Niedringhaus wrote.
My assignment, regardless of the era, is about people—civilians and soldiers. The legacy of any photographer is her or his ability to capture the moment, to record history. For me it is about showing the struggle and survival of the individual. Conflict is not all that I cover. I like the Olympics and the World Cup. In sports, there is a start and a finish. With war, the story never ends. It keeps me coming back.
Here are some of Niedringhaus' photos from Afghanistan from the last week.
An Afghan girl helps her brother down from a security barrier set up outside the Independent Election Commission (IEC) office in the eastern Afghan city of Khost, Thursday, April 3, 2014. Afghans go to the polls to elect a new President on April 5, 2014. (AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)
A child pulls a rope which keeps Afghan women in line queuing to get their registration card on the last day of voter registration for the upcoming presidential elections outside a school in Kabul, Afghanistan, Tuesday, April 1, 2014. Elections will take place on April 5, 2014. (AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)
An Afghan man shouts in support for presidential candidate Ashraf Ghani Ahmadza as he arrives with others for an election campaign rally to the stadium in Kabul, Afghanistan, Tuesday, April 1, 2014. Elections will take place on April 5, 2014. (AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)
An Afghan man waits to have his picture taken for his registration card on the last day of voter registration for the upcoming presidential elections outside a school in Kabul, Afghanistan, Tuesday, April 1, 2014. Elections will take place on April 5, 2014. (AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)
An Afghan soldier, left, and a policeman peek through a window as they queue with others to get their registration card on the last day of voter registration for the upcoming presidential elections outside a school in Kabul, Afghanistan, Tuesday, April 1, 2014. Elections will take place on April 5, 2014. (AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)
An Afghan woman sits on destroyed school benches as she waits to get her registration card on the last day of voter registration for the upcoming presidential elections outside a school in Kabul, Afghanistan, Tuesday, April 1, 2014. Elections will take place on April 5, 2014. (AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)
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Reuters uses activists as photographers in Syria

The New York Times
Reuters employs rebel activists and "in one case a spokesman" as photographers in Syria, James Estrin and Karam Shoumali write. In interviews with photographers there, they say there are more issues with the wire service's practices:

Three [photographers] also said that the freelancers had provided Reuters with images that were staged or improperly credited, sometimes under pseudonyms. And while Reuters has given the local stringers protective vests and helmets, most said that the stringers lacked training in personal safety and first aid.
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Custom camera-mounted device lets Toronto Star photographers file direct to live blog

The Canadian Journalism Project It's hard to file photos from Toronto's Air Canada Centre, Toronto Star visuals editor Taras Slawnych tells Mark Taylor: "There are lights around the arena and every time these neon lights and billboard signs go on it creates a lot of interference. Traditional ways of submitting with a WiFi card or some other way just didn’t work." So the Star built its own device, called AWAC -- for "Automated Web Access Coupling." It sits "on the hot shoe mount," Slawnych says, and "basically provides the Internet connection, the routing of it, and then sends the picture to an FTP site. There’s a (HTML) script here that handles it and then there’s another script that sends it to a ScribbleLive blog and the (Toronto Star) archive at the same time." Slawnych says he's not sure whether the Star will patent the device -- other reporters "are trying to figure out what the hell we’re doing," he says -- but did allow that it was 3-D printed and that the Star has spent about $2,500 developing it. The device solves a workflow problem other technical solutions to filing in the field don't, Slawnych says:
Traditional wire agencies have a whole bunch of things to do this as well. The problem is the traditional workflow. Let’s say it’s a wire photographer shooting the game like we did. He sends the picture, and he’s probably sending it just as fast as we are. The picture then goes to headquarters and is then put on the wires. There’s probably a minute delay, maybe 30 seconds even. The picture is then sent out to an FTP to newspapers around the world. Then you’ve got a processor from your archive that is picking up these shots every 30 seconds, every minute. To put that picture online, you have to publish that picture onto your pagination system and wait for it to appear there. That’s probably another 30 seconds and then you have to move it onto your online Content Management System, which is probably minimum 30 seconds. And that’s if everyone is watching everything and has the time to do that. So that’s at least two, three minutes if every step worked out perfectly, which I doubt because there’s going to be other pictures moving on the wire. The editor that’s pulling that picture might not be paying attention because he’s doing other stuff at the same time. Our picture, without anyone having to touch it here, is on our blog within 45 seconds.
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White House photographers protest lack of access to Obama meeting with Dalai Lama

The White House News Photographers Association White House photographers issued a statement Friday protesting the release of an official photograph showing President Obama's meeting with the Dalai Lama. The handout photo was produced despite requests by news organizations to have the "closed press" event opened to photojournalists. The group urged news organizations not to publish or circulate the official photo, which it called "a visual press release of a news worthy event." In a statement on its website, WHNPA added:
A government photographer is no substitute for an independent, experienced photojournalist. We are disappointed the White House has reverted to their old strategy of announcing a closed press event and then later releasing their own photo.
News organizations and the White House have been at odds over the Obama administration's practice of locking out photojournalists from official events and distributing its own pictures. Several news outlets, including USA Today, have stated they will not use the handout photos except in "extraordinary circumstances."
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USA vs. CHN Curling

Sochi photo coverage takes ‘patience, planning, logistics’

Harry Walker, photo director at McClatchy-Tribune Information Services, has a unique vantage point overseeing MCT’s visual coverage of the Olympic Games.

Raised in Savannah, Ga., Walker graduated from Morehouse College in 1980. He started his photojournalism career at The Columbus … Read more

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U.K. newspapers decide photographers aren’t necessary

HoldTheFrontPage | The Guardian
Johnston Press' newspapers in England's Midlands region will no longer have photographers, Helen Lambourne reports. A source tells Lambourne "the papers would instead rely on freelance photographers, along with increasing use of submitted pictures from readers and reporters taking photos on their phones."

In The Guardian, Roy Greenslade says concerns about quality probably won't be relevant "at local weekly newspaper level."
No event occurs - fires, fetes, road accidents, cats up trees, whatever - without someone being on hand to snap a picture. In the real sense of the word, newspaper photographers are therefore redundant.
Photographers "must surely recognise that their fate is due to a combination of the digital revolution and newspaper economics," Greenslade writes. "It does make sense."

Johnston Press owns newspapers throughout the U.K. Greenslade says he's heard reports that the company plans a similar move in Scotland. In 2012, Johnston Press eliminated the role of editor-in-chief at Edinburgh's The Scotsman, saying it wanted to create a "flatter, more efficient management structure." The company recently hired Jeff Moriarty from the Boston Globe in a top digital role.

Previously: Chicago Sun-Times lays off its photo staff
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Martin Luther King Jr. under shepherd’s watch: debunking urban legend

St. Petersburg Times photographer Bob Moreland took this photo in June 1964 after Martin Luther King Jr. was arrested during a St. Augustine, Fla., sit-in and was being transported to Duval County jail. The caption read: “Dr. King Sits in
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obama & pete souza

PoynterVision: White House photo practices break promise of open government

Kenny Irby, senior faculty at Poynter, advises the public to critically analyze photos from the White House Press Office, particularly as it routinely denies photojournalists access to the president.

Founder of Poynter’s photojournalism program, Irby says he doesn’t believe … Read more

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