Articles about "Plagiarism"


After new plagiarism allegations, Time magazine will review Zakaria’s work again

Our Bad Media

Time magazine will review Fareed Zakaria’s work after Twitter users @blippoblappo and @crushingbort accused the CNN journalist of lifting from a variety of publications, including Vanity Fair, Businessweek and the New Yorker.

Time magazine “takes the accusations seriously,” according to a statement from Daniel Kile, vice president of communications for Time Inc.:

In 2012, we conducted a review of Zakaria’s work for TIME and were satisfied with the results of that investigation. We will be reviewing these new allegations carefully.

Zakaria is the host of “Fareed Zakaria GPS,” a columnist for the Washington Post and was recently named a contributor to Atlantic Media. He was previously an editor-at-large for Time magazine.

Fred Hiatt, the editorial page editor of The Washington Post, called the new accusations “reckless” in a statement to Poynter:

“If I’m not mistaken, the newest allegations feature only one WP column, and when I looked at that I thought it was so far from a case of plagiarism that it made me question the entire enterprise. Take a look. Fareed uses some budgetary information that is also cited in a Center for American Progress report.”

The Post intends to keep Zakaria as a contributor and will not be conducting another review of his work, said Kristine Coratti, the paper’s director of communications.

The fresh allegations of plagiarism, which were posted to the blog “Our Bad Media,” unearthed 12 instances where some of Zakaria’s work closely resembles the work of others. Here are a few of the articles flagged in the post:

In addition to Time magazine, The Washington Post and CNN both conducted reviews of Zakaria’s work in 2012. All publications cleared him of further wrongdoing and reinstated him; Time magazine spokeswoman Ali Zelenko called the incident an “unintentional error,” and CNN said their review found “nothing that merited continuing his suspension.”

Related: Fareed Zakaria: ‘People are piling on with every grudge or vendetta’ | Fareed Zakaria says many journalists don’t attribute quotations | Fareed Zakaria suspended from Time, CNN for plagiarizing New Yorker story Read more

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Police Shooting Missouri

Cop to reporter: ‘You’re going to be in my jail cell tonight’

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories. Maybe it’s not really 10. Let’s not dwell on specifics.

  1. Reporters arrested, assaulted in Ferguson: Washington Post reporter Wesley Lowery and Huffington Post reporter Ryan J. Reilly were arrested Wednesday night while covering the unrest in Ferguson, Missouri. (Poynter) | They were working in a McDonald’s when police ordered them to leave. Both started documenting the transaction on their phones. Lowery said one cop slammed him into a soda fountain after his bag slipped off his shoulder and he ducked down to get it; Reilly said a cop pushed him into a plate-glass window and “sarcastically apologized.” (HuffPost) | In his account of his arrest, Lowery writes that he told an arresting officer “This story’s going to get out there. It’s going to be on the front page of The Washington Post tomorrow.” The cop, Lowery reports, replied, “Yeah, well, you’re going to be in my jail cell tonight.” (WP) | Today’s Washington Post front page | Today’s St. Louis Post-Dispatch front page | HuffPost splash: “BAGHDAD USA” | Front pages, as always, courtesy the Newseum.
  2. Other reporters say they were injured while on the job for this story: MSNBC reporter Trymaine Lee was tear-gassed while covering protests Wednesday. (@trymainelee) | Al Jazeera journalists got tear-gassed, too. (Vox) | The St. Louis American says cops pointed weapons at two of its reporters. (@StLouisAmerican) | NYT freelancer Whitney Curtis was reportedly hit by a rubber bullet Monday. (@PDPJ) | Antonio French, the St. Louis alderman who has provided citizen coverage of the protests through social media, was also arrested. (HuffPost) | You’ll hear people complaining today that “the media” is focusing too much on injuriries sustained by its own, or that Lowery and Reilly, as Dana Loesch trolled, “hijacked the light onto themselves.” | Such criticisms are easily dealt with. Elise Foley: “I love the accusations that @ryanjreilly and @WesleyLowery got themselves arrested to get attention BY SITTING IN A McDONALD’S.” (@elisefoley) | But as Lowery told the Post’s Mark Berman last night (in a story that has been, unfortunately, updated to exclude the quote), most people in Ferguson who “don’t have as many Twitter followers as I have” can’t call Jeff Bezos when they get arrested. (I’m paraphrasing because this fantastic quote is gone. Here’s my best account of it from last night.) (WP) | Or as Huffington Post reporter Jason Cherkis tweeted: “Makes you wonder what #Ferguson police do when they think no one is watching.” (@jasoncherkis)
  3. Meanwhile, Nate Silver remembered that time he ate a burrito in jail: Thanks for the update. (Gawker)
  4. Sally Quinn remembers Lauren Bacall: Through the lens of the time Bacall and Ben Bradlee disappeared into the dunes in Amagansett. “It was no consolation when Betty came over to me as we were leaving and confided in me that Ben was the only man who had ever reminded her of Bogey.” (WP)
  5. How to build a non-diverse newsroom: “The biggest factor that leads to a homogenous newsroom is an over-reliance of personal recommendations,” Judd Legum says. (BuzzFeed)
  6. Tough times at The Tennessean: “In off-the-record conversations — staffers would only talk anonymously for fear of jeopardizing their chances to get a job in the new newsroom — Tennessean personnel described the climate at 1100 Broadway as ‘horrific’ and ‘morose.’” (Nashville Scene)
  7. An update on Joseph Hosey: James Risen’s bid to get the DOJ off his back is getting lots of deserved attention, but Hosey, a Patch editor who obtained police reports on a grisly murder in Joliet, Ill., still faces jail and fines for refusing to name a source. (CJR) | From last year: A quick overview of the Hosey case. (Poynter)
  8. Plagiarism punished: Dylan Byers: “Vice Media has dismissed i-D writer Jack Borkett after he posted an item about Lauren Bacall that lifted the title and portions of text from a New York Magazine article.” (Politico)
  9. The Ann Arbor Chronicle brought in about $100,000 a year: “That was enough to pay the Chronicle’s expenses and to allow [Publisher Mary] Morgan and [Editor Dave] Askins to make a living, but if they wanted to bring on additional full-time help to ease their workload, Askins estimated that existing revenue would need to increase by four times to fund a full-time staff of five.” (Nieman)
  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Fiona McCann, Byron Beck, Cornelius Swart and Shelby Sebens have joined GoLocalPDX, a Portland news website that will launch later this month. McCann will be a senior editor at the site; she was an editor at Storyful. Beck will be the site’s features editor. He has written for a variety of publications in the Portland area, including The Oregonian and Willamette Week. Swart will be the site’s director of content. He was the founder and publisher of the Portland Sentinel. Sebens will be lead investigative journalist for GoLocalPDX. Formerly, she was a correspondent for Reuters. (GoLocalPDX) | Michele Promaulayko will be editor-in-chief of Yahoo Health. Previously, she was editor-in-chief of Women’s Health. Katie Brown will be editor-in-chief of Yahoo DIY Crafts Magazine. She was the host of “Katie Brown Workshop” on Create TV. Sarah Cristobal will be editor of Yahoo Style. Previously, she was the editor of V Magazine. She will be joined by Nick Axelrod, former editorial director of Into the Gloss and Andrea Oliveri, a celebrity bookings director. Both will be contributing editors. Bifen Xu will be special projects director for the site, focusing on photography. Formerly, she was a producer at W Magazine. (Yahoo) | Job of the day: The National Journal is looking for a reporter. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org.

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New York Times Slim

NYT acknowledges Carol Vogel lifted from Wikipedia

mediawiremorningGood morning. 10-ish, anyone?

  1. NYT acknowledges Carol Vogel lifted from Wikipedia: Part of a July 25 column “used specific language and details from a Wikipedia article without attribution; it should not have been published in that form,” a grisly editor’s note reads. (NYT) | Times spokesperson Eileen Murphy told Ravi Somaiya “editors have dealt with Carol on the issue.” (NYT) | “It seems to me that there can be little dispute about the claim,” Times Public Editor Margaret Sullivan wrote Wednesday. “Anyone can see the similarity.” (NYT)
  2. E.W. Scripps Co. and Journal Communications will combine broadcast properties, spin off newspapers: The companies “are so similar and share the deep commitment to public service through enterprise journalism,” Scripps Chairman Richard A. Boehne says. Among the newspapers in the new company, named Journal Media Group: The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel and The (Memphis, Tennessee) Commercial Appeal (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel) | “The complicated transaction is the latest move by media companies to focus on either television or print operations, with nearly all choosing to leave behind the slower-growing print business.” (NYT) | Al Tompkins: Scripps “is well positioned to cash in on mid-term political spending with stations in hotly contested political grounds of Ohio and Florida.” (Poynter) | “This deal looks much better for print spinoff than the Tribune deal. No debt or pension obligation. That is huge.” (@dlboardman)
  3. News Corp may bring back something like The Daily: It’s “working on an app-based news service aimed at ‘millennial’ readers” that would “would blend original reporting with repurposed content from News Corp properties such as the Wall Street Journal,” Matthew Garrahan reports. (FT) | Earlier this month, News Corp VP of product Kareem Amin talked about a project in development: “Our users are getting older and our products don’t have as much reach into the younger generation, and we would like to reach them on mobile devices,” Craig Silverman reports he said. (API) | #TBT: Jeff Sonderman on lessons from The Daily’s demise (Poynter)
  4. David Frum apologizes: Images from Gaza he questioned “do appear authentic, and I should not have cast doubt on them.” (The Atlantic) | “Atlantic spokesperson Anna Bross says Frum isn’t facing any repercussions from the company.” (Poynter) | “Frum showed how utterly inclined he is to believe and recirculate a claim of Palestinian photo fakery. Journalists guard against their biases by checking their reporting before publishing it.” (The Washington Post)
  5. Is Vocativ for real? The company, which says it plumbs the “deep web” for stories, has a deal to provide video to MSNBC and is about to announce a series on Showtime. But many who’ve used its vaunted software, Johana Bhuiyan reports, describe “a milieu in which they and other employees continually misled the company’s leadership about the usefulness of the software in their reporting, writing and video work.” Also worth noting: One exec tells Bhuiyan the company paid George Takei “under-the-counter” to tweet stories. (Capital) | #TBT: This is Bhuiyan’s last story for Capital; she’s moving over to BuzzFeed. Earlier this month, she gave advice to media reporters: “Turn your computer off once in a while.” (Poynter)
  6. Where did Plain Dealer journalists land? A year ago today, the paper cut about a third of its newsroom. Where are they now? There “aren’t a lot of of jobs that are cooler than being a reporter,” John Horton, who now works in media relations at Cuyahoga Community College, said. “I mean, that’s what Superman was.” (Poynter)
  7. Why Twitter’s diversity statistics matter: The company is 70 percent male and 59 percent white. That’s “a problem because white men unconsciously build products for white men – products that subtly discourage anyone else from using them,” Jess Zimmerman writes. (The Guardian) | Related: How would Twitter users react if it offered a moderated, Facebook-style feed? (Gigaom)
  8. Thomson Reuters releases second-quarter results: Revenue at the news division was down 1 percent from the same period last year. (Thomson Reuters) | The company’s cost-cutting program helped swing it to a profit, even as net income “was little changed.” (Bloomberg News)
  9. Here is a picture of Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein in the Washington Post newsroom: “Very, very cool moment.” (‏@JoshWhiteTWP) | Related: Jeremy Barr asks Post Executive Editor Marty Baron whether “that traditional path” to the Post, through small papers, is still the way in. Baron: “I would say that that model passed a long time ago.” (Capital)
  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Margery Eagan will be a spirituality columnist for Crux, The Boston Globe’s Catholicism vertical. Previously, she was a columnist for The Boston Herald. Lauren Shea is now a project director at The Boston Globe. Formerly, she was a senior digital producer at Arnold Worldwide. Corey Gottlieb and Angus Durocher will be executive directors of digital strategy and operations for Boston.com and The Globe’s online marketplace. Formerly, Gottlieb was a senior manager of product development at Major League Baseball Advanced Media. Durocher was a lead engineer at YouTube. Adam Vaccaro, formerly a writer at Inc. Magazine, has joined The Globe as a staff writer, along with Sara Morrison and Eric Levenson, both from The Atlantic Wire. Laura Amico, the creator of Homicide Watch, has also joined The Globe as news editor in charge of multimedia and data projects. (dankennedy.net) | Lindsay Zoladz will be pop music critic for New York magazine. She’s currently an associate editor at Pitchfork. (@lindsayzoladz) | Eva Rodriguez will be a senior editor at Politico Magazine. Formerly, she was an editorial writer at The Washington Post. (@DylanByers) | Job of the day: Oregon Public Broadcasting is looking for an assignment editor! Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org.

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Medical Marijuana Kids

NYT will take pot questions at 4:20 today

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 or so media stories.

  1. BuzzFeed fired Benny Johnson for plagiarism: “After carefully reviewing more than 500 of Benny’s posts, we have found 41 instances of sentences or phrases copied word for word from other sites,” BuzzFeed EIC Ben Smith wrote Friday night. (BuzzFeed) | Smith’s memo to staffers. (@brianstelter) | Johnson’s lifts offend “not only readers but Web journos everywhere who fiddle to no end with their copy to guarantee originality, who link neurotically to eliminate any suggestion of misappropriation, who close and reopen and close and reopen their posts before publishing to re-inspect this little thing or that little thing, and who finally hit ‘publish’ with a plume of palm sweat.” (The Washington Post) | The 34 sources from which Johnson lifted. (Gawker) | BuzzFeed stands by a January piece in which Johnson quoted anonymous intelligence sources who said they’d like to kill Edward Snowden. (Pando)
  2. Legalize pot, NYT editorial board urges: “Repeal Prohibition, Again” (NYT) | The NYT will continue to drug-test employees: “‘Our corporate policy on this issue reflects current law,’ the spokeswoman said.” (HuffPost) | Judy Woodruff: “When I think of grass I think of something to walk on, pot as something to put a plant in.” (Mediaite) | Times Editorial Page Editor Andrew Rosenthal will take questions on Facebook at 4:20 p.m. Monday (NYT Facebook)
  3. Sarah Palin launches subscription-based online channel: “The conservative pol’s online network is modeled on TheBlaze, the online-video network and website that ex-Fox News host Glenn Beck launched in 2011.” (Variety) | “no half-term package?” (‏@SteveFriess) | Palin calls The Washington Post’s leadership “wusses” (Sarah Palin Facebook)
  4. The National Enquirer wants to win again: Joe Pompeo writes about the newspaper’s struggle to claw back from financial and editorial struggles. “Anyone who has information and wants to get paid, call me,” Editor-in-Chief Dylan Howard tells Pompeo. “My checkbook is open.” (Capital)
  5. Michel Martin writes about childcare: Women of color “often face additional pressures that white women are far less likely to encounter” when balancing work and family, the NPR host writes. “One reason I am so disappointed about the cancellation of Tell Me More, which will have its last broadcast Aug. 1, is that the show has allowed me to prioritize these discussions on my own terms.” (National Journal)
  6. News, but with ambient sound: Tools to lighten your text-heavy articles. (journalism.co.uk)
  7. Reddit wants to improve its advertising business: “‘Reddit is a 1998 product, trying to have a 1998 business model,’ said Gina Bianchini, chief executive of Mightybell, a social networking start-up.” (NYT)
  8. Tweet of the weekend: “BREAKING: Col Allen out, J. Jonah Jameson in at New York Post.” (@harrysiegel)
  9. Here’s today’s world news, edited by Kristen Hare: Media regulators say the BBC’s Jeremy Clarksondeliberately used a pejorative racial term to refer to an Asian man on BBC2’s Top Gear, causing offense without justification and breaching broadcasting rules,” Jason Deans reported for The Guardian. The incident took place in March during an episode of “Top Gear.” | In a Sunday editorial, The New York Times said censorship and pressures on the press have returned to India. | Here’s the front page from Apple Daily – Taiwan edition, in Taipei, Taiwan. (Beware the shopping cart.) Front page courtesy Newseum.

    TAIW_AD

  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Joe Flint will be a media reporter at The Wall Street Journal. He’s currently a media reporter for the Los Angeles Times. (@JBflint) | Danielle Knox will be an anchor and reporter at WSVN in Miami. Formerly, she hosted a show on Lifetime. (TVSpy) | Tammy Cohen and Lori Cohn have both been named executive beauty directors at Self. Formerly, they were both executive beauty directors at Lucky. (FishbowlNY) | Job of the day: The Kokomo Tribune is hiring a sports reporter. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org.

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BuzzFeed fires Benny Johnson for plagiarism

Buzzfeed

BuzzFeed fired viral politics editor Benny Johnson after an investigation revealed “41 instances of sentences or phrases copied word for word from other sites“, BuzzFeed Editor-in-Chief Ben Smith wrote in a note to readers Friday night.

“Benny is a friend, colleague and, at his best, a creative force, but we had no choice other than letting him go,” Smith wrote. Read more

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BuzzFeed is reviewing Benny Johnson’s work

Our Bad Media

BuzzFeed is reviewing the work of viral politics editor Benny Johnson, BuzzFeed Editor-in-Chief Ben Smith tells Poynter.

Two Twitter users who go by @blippoblappo and @crushingbort have published what they call “more plagiarism” from Johnson, who Smith told Gawker’s J.K. Trotter is “one of the web’s deeply original writers.”

Some of what @blippoblappo and @crushingbort uncovered is patchwriting, but Smith says, “There are three serious instances of plagiarism in this post.” He told Poynter yesterday that he planned to keep Johnson on staff. Read more

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Screen Shot 2014-07-25 at 9.17.58 AM

The history of TMZ, FT’s mobile revenue rises

mediawiremorningGood morning. Almost there! Here are 10 or so stories.

  1. The problem with making a graphic about diversity in top newsroom positions over the years: “there isn’t really any racial diversity at all,” Manjula Martin writes. “Any way you click it, of the 183 top editors of mainstream English-language media outlets [Vijith] Assar counted here, one is a black man. Nine are white women (and two of them are Tina Brown).” (Scratch)
  2. Digital subscriptions up 33 percent at FT: Total circulation (677,000 across platforms) is up 13 percent over the first half of last year, FT parent Pearson reports in its half-year results. Mobile “now generates almost 50% of total traffic and 20% of new digital subscriptions,” and mobile ad revenue was up 9 percent. (Pearson) | But sales are down at Pearson, which will have cut 4,000 jobs through 2014. (Bloomberg News) | Related, from March: “How data from Financial Times readers lead to more readers and revenue” (Poynter)
  3. AP’s Gaza-based staff wins the news co-op’s “Beat of the Week” award: In one instance, Senior Managing Editor Mike Oreskes writes in a memo to staffers, photographer Hatem Moussa called colleagues to help and then alerted a Red Cross team after he heard a woman under rubble say, “I’m here under the shop. God please, I can’t breathe.” Rescuers later pulled her from the rubble as well as her husband and her niece. (AP)
  4. The history of TMZ: Anne Helen Petersen takes a long, fun look at the “well-oiled, money-making, gossip-generating machine” and asks whether it has “compromised the mission that set it apart from the rest of the gossip industry.” (BuzzFeed)
  5. NowThis News changes name to NowThis: The moniker tweak “lets the edit team focus on what’s trending on social channels,” Lucia Moses writes. (Digiday)
  6. Reddit’s live-blogging platform is out of beta: “RedditLive doesn’t have to be a publisher, though that’s technically what it is, but could be a really good source for you in the newsroom,” Karen Fratti writes. (10,000 Words)
  7. BuzzFeed corrects posts with swiped material: Three posts by viral politics editor Benny Johnson contained unattributed text, J.K. Trotter reports. (Gawker) | BuzzFeed EIC Ben Smith says Johnson will remain on staff. (Poynter) | On Wednesday, Johnson accused another publication of stealing his work, saying, “Repeat after me: Copying and pasting someone’s work is called ‘plagiarism’ (@bennyjohnson) | “Citing that tweet, Trotter told POLITICO: ‘I subscribe to Benny Johnson’s theory of plagiarism, under which Benny Johnson is guilty of plagiarism.’” (Politico)
  8. Why Kevin Sablan took a buyout from the OC Register: “I didn’t see our digital efforts move forward. I was happy that we hired dozens of new journalists. I was excited about new weekly community papers. I couldn’t believe how thick our paper had gotten. But I didn’t see any real advancement for our online subscribers.” (Almighty Link)
  9. Here’s today’s world news, edited by Kristen Hare: Al Jazeera correspondent Peter Greste is appealing his seven-year Egyptian jail sentence, Paul Farrell reported in The Guardian. Farrell reports that Greste plans to work with an Egyptian lawyer. | Journalists have been banned from covering fighting in the Donetsk region of eastern Ukraine, according to a report from Reporters Without Borders. “Signed on 21 July by PRD “defence minister” Igor Strelkov and released yesterday, it is fuelling arbitrary arrests of journalists operating in the region.” | The Washington Post’s correspondent in Tehran is in government custody in Iran along with four other journalists, Ernesto Londoño reported Thursday in the Post. Jason Rezaian has worked for the Post since 2012, Londoño reported. | From The Province, published in Vancouver, Canada, a perfect Friday headline. (Front page courtesy Newseum.)

    CAN_TP

  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Joshua Topolsky, the co-founder and top editor of The Verge, will join Bloomberg as “the editor of a series of new online ventures,” Ravi Somaiya reported in The New York Times. He will be replaced by co-founder Nilay Patel, currently the managing editor of Vox.com. (Poynter) | Derl McCrudden has been named head of international video for the Associated Press. Formerly he was head of video newsgathering. Denise Vance, AP’s deputy director of U.S. video, has been named head of U.S. video and radio. Vaughn Morrison, former vice president for programming and production for TV Guide on Demand, has been named AP’s head of U.S. video production. (AP) | Jake Milstein has been promoted to news director of KIRO in Seattle. Previously, he was KIRO’s managing editor. (coxmediagroup.com) | Simone Eli is a sports reporter and anchor at Houston’s KPRC. Previously, she was a sportscaster at WALA in Mobile, Alabama. (@Simone_Eli) | Alexandra Peers has been named culture editor at the New York Observer. Peers is “a veteran arts writer” and has been a reporter with The Wall Street Journal, Joe Pompeo writes. (Capital New York) | Indrani Sen, formerly an interim editor at Quartz, will be deputy news editor there. She’ll be joined at Quartz by Heather Landy, who will be Quartz’ global news editor. Formerly, Landy was editor in chief at American Banker. (Mediabistro) | Job of the day: The Lamar Ledger in Southeast Colorado is looking for a news editor. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs)| Send Ben your job moves:bmullin@poynter.org.

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BuzzFeed changes posts that swiped text

Gawker | Our Bad Media

BuzzFeed has updated and attached corrections to three articles by Benny Johnson that swiped passages from other sources, J.K. Trotter reports in Gawker. The notes (1, 2, 3) were added Thursday afternoon.

Two Twitter users with the names @blippoblappo and @crushingbort outlined examples of Johnson lifting text, in one case from a press release from U.S. Rep. Sam Johnson.

BuzzFeed Editor-in-Chief Ben Smith told Trotter BuzzFeed was “grateful to @blippoblappo and @crushingbort” for alerting it to the lifted text and said Johnson, the publication’s viral politics editor, “is one of the web’s deeply original writers, as is clear from his body of work.”

Smith told Poynter that BuzzFeed plans to keep Johnson on. Read more

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Bloomberg publications await launch dates, alt-weeklies get together on a story

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Where are Bloomberg’s new verticals? Its politics site will launch in October, “30 days before the 2014 Midterms,” Joe Pompeo reports. Bloomberg Business, Bloomberg Markets and Bloomberg Pursuits have “no hard launch dates,” Pompeo writes. “‘It’s still mostly chatter about strategy with no product being delivered,’ said one executive who was not authorized to speak on the record. ‘People want to see something on the table, basically.’” (Capital)
  2. Pulitzers have a new boss: Former Concord Monitor Editor Mike Pride will become the administrator of the Pulitzer Prizes this September. (NYT) | Pride talks with Kristen Hare: “What the Pulitzers really have to do, like every other institution associated with journalism, they have to change with the times and the times are changing very quickly.” (Poynter)
  3. Brown Moses is launching a site for crowdsourced reporting: Bellingcat will give citizen journalists “a chance to learn what I’ve learnt over the last two years by trial and error,” Eliot Higgins, a.k.a. Brown Moses, tells Mathew Ingram. (Gigaom) | Previously: “How an unemployed blogger confirmed that Syria had used chemical weapons.” (The New Yorker)
  4. RIP Jeffrey Ressner: The former writer for Politico, Time, Rolling Stone, L.A. Weekly and others was 56. (Billboard, LA Observed)
  5. Google Reader has been dead for a year: How do you use RSS, if you still do? (Mashable) | For what it’s worth, I really like Digg Reader.
  6. It’s time to credential SCOTUSblog: “According to the site’s internal data, Scotusblog’s single biggest user is the Supreme Court itself.” (NYT) | SCOTUSblog Publisher Tom Goldstein talks about the sassy replies he sent to Twitter users who confused his blog with the court. The message? “Just to take a minute and be more civil and think about what you are doing rather than blasting off.” (AJR)
  7. Alt-weeklies bash politicians: A bunch of AAN member papers will publish an “unabashedly irreverent” 15,000-word piece about the country’s worst politicians this week. (AAN) | Did they Snowfall it? They Snowfalled it! (America’s Worst Politicians)
  8. Sources at powerful institutions usually fit into five categories: “The scorned lover,” “The only guy with half a brain,” “The charmer,” “The suicide bomber,” “The archivist.” More tips from New York Times reporter Matt Apuzzo. (Jim Romenesko)
  9. Plagiarism: The T-shirt: Only $6.99. (LOL Shirts)
  10. Job stuff: Jane Spencer is Fusion’s new digital editor-in-chief. She had been The Wall Street Journal’s editor of digital projects and innovation. (Politico) | Mark Katches is The Oregonian’s new editor. He had been at the Center for Investigative Reporting. (Willamette Week) | Stan Wischnowski is the new vice president for news operations at The Philadelphia Inquirer, the Philadelphia Daily News and Philly.com. He had been the Inquirer’s executive editor. (The Philadelphia Inquirer) | Carol Loomis is retiring from Fortune: “this year marks her 60th as an employee of Fortune and Time Inc., a record surely never to be broken,” Managing Editor Andy Serwer writes. (Fortune)

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Gawker suspends staffer after story with ‘several similarities’ to Miami New Times piece

Gawker Editor Max Read has suspended staff writer Jay Hathaway after he posted a story that drew on a Miami New Times story without attribution. An editor’s note now adorns the post.

Reached by email, Read said he didn’t think Hathaway’s post went through an editor, and that Gawker would look at Hathaway’s other writings “As a matter of course.” He also said, “I want to emphasize this is the first time he’s ever been accused of plagiarism, and I have faith that he will never duplicate or fail to cite ever again.”

Read plans to look “at the site as a whole” to make sure “we’re maintaining best ‘how not to blog like a huge prick’ practices,” he writes.

Here’s Read’s memo to Gawker staff:

As soon as I send this email, I’ll be attaching the following note to this post:

On Sunday, the writer Kris Ex called our attention to several similarities between this post and an article by Kyle Munzenrieder in the Miami New Times, located here–specifically, several similar phrasings, one outright identical phrase, and a close structural similarity. The New Times article was not linked to or cited in any way.

The author of the Gawker post, Jay Hathaway, says he read the New Times article before writing his, and “parts of it probably got stuck in my head while I was posting. I didn’t intend to duplicate any of their article, and I definitely meant to link the source prominently.” I believe Jay, but both the inadvertent duplication and the lack of citation are serious errors. Since even the appearance of wrongdoing does serious damage to our credibility and integrity, I’m suspending Jay for a week. Both he and I offer our sincerest apologies to Munzenreider and the New Times.

To reiterate, this is a serious error, and one none of us can afford to make.

We are, and always have been, frank aggregators–by which I mean we are honest about our aggregation. This is of the utmost importance. We are not in the business of hiding links or sources; we are generous with our credits and citations; and we do not present others’ writing as our own. This is a key component of what Hamilton calls “how to blog without being a huge prick.” Our credibility and integrity—our ability to write honestly and critically about other outlets and institutions—is on the line.

Please feel free to email me if you have any questions. I’m happy to meet with any of you privately today.

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