Articles about "Plagiarism"


Gawker suspends staffer after story with ‘several similarities’ to Miami New Times piece

Gawker Editor Max Read has suspended staff writer Jay Hathaway after he posted a story that drew on a Miami New Times story without attribution. An editor’s note now adorns the post.

Reached by email, Read said he didn’t think Hathaway’s post went through an editor, and that Gawker would look at Hathaway’s other writings “As a matter of course.” He also said, “I want to emphasize this is the first time he’s ever been accused of plagiarism, and I have faith that he will never duplicate or fail to cite ever again.”

Read plans to look “at the site as a whole” to make sure “we’re maintaining best ‘how not to blog like a huge prick’ practices,” he writes.

Here’s Read’s memo to Gawker staff:

As soon as I send this email, I’ll be attaching the following note to this post:

On Sunday, the writer Kris Ex called our attention to several similarities between this post and an article by Kyle Munzenrieder in the Miami New Times, located here–specifically, several similar phrasings, one outright identical phrase, and a close structural similarity.

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Coming clean: notes on becoming an honest writer

I’ve written four books since 2006, and I’m at work on another. But for every book that reaches publication, I have at least one (sometimes two or three) proposals rejected.

One of them was to be called “The Honest Writer: A Guide to Originality.” I stumbled upon my proposal last week and delivered part of it to a group of college teachers gathered for a conference on academic integrity. Having dusted it off for them, I thought I’d show it to you. It includes, you should know at the start, a list of some of my literary sins over the years. The purpose of such a list is not to insist that everyone cheats, or, as they say in the sports world: “If you ain’t cheatin’, you ain’t tryin’.” I write more in the spirit of “The Confessions” of St.… Read more

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Reuters will investigate CNN plagiarist’s work

Reuters was “not aware of any concerns raised” about Marie-Louise Gumuchian’s work when she was a reporter there, Head of Corporate Affairs David Crundwell tells Poynter in an email. “However in light of press reports we are reviewing her stories.”

CNN said Friday it had dismissed Gumuchian, a news editor in London, after finding plagiarism in more than 50 of her stories. A CNN source told Poynter she had primarily lifted copy from Reuters. “She worked for us for about six months, so if we found that many in six months I can’t imagine the job Reuters has now,” the source told Craig Silverman. … Read more

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CNN serial plagiarist primarily lifted from her old employer, Reuters

Editors at CNN were performing a regular spot check of content in the organization’s publishing queue last week when they discovered that a story by London bureau news editor Marie-Louise Gumuchian included material taken without attribution from another source.

Using plagiarism detection software, they quickly turned up more examples and in the end have so far found that Gumuchian plagiarized in roughly 50 articles.

CNN leadership announced their findings and her firing in an Editor’s Note published today. Gumuchian was on the CNN world desk, and appears to have written frequently about the Middle East, among other topics.

“Most of what we found was [lifted] from Reuters, which she was previously employed by,” says a CNN source who asked not to be identified due to the fact that they were not cleared to speak publicly about the incident.… Read more

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CNN CUTS

CNN fires serial plagiarist

CNN

CNN has terminated news editor Marie-Louise Gumuchian after discovering “multiple instances of plagiarism,” it says in an editors’ note Friday. Gumuchian was based in London.

An unpublished story flagged last week during our editing process led to an internal investigation that uncovered other examples in about 50 published stories, and our investigation is ongoing.

CNN says it has “removed the instances of plagiarism found in her pieces” and “In some cases, we’ve chosen to delete an entire article.”… Read more

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FILE - In this March 12, 2004 file photo, former New York Times reporter, Jayson Blair speaks to an audience in New York's Harlem neighborhood. After the plagiary scandal, Blair has been working as a life coach in northern Va. since 2007. The ex-New York Times reporter best known for fabricating and plagiarizing says his experience hitting the lows helps him relate to people, and the respected psychologist who hired him into his practice agrees: "Jayson is now using his talents for good." (AP Photo/Jennifer Szymaszek, File)

Washington Post was ambivalent about Jayson Blair story at first

The Washington Post

Washington Post reporter Manuel Roig-Franzia writes that when he discovered New York Times reporter Jayson Blair had plagiarized from a San Antonio Express-News article, “I called the national desk at The Post and suggested we write about what appeared to be an egregious case of plagiarism.” He “didn’t relish the idea of doing a gotcha piece about another journalist. For years, I felt so conflicted about the events that took place on that reporting trip that I seldom mentioned my small, early role in what became a major scandal.”

Roig-Franzia says the Post’s first reaction was “Meh.” After he met with Macarena Hernandez, who wrote the Express-News story, he decided to try again:

I made another call, and this time my editor, Daniel LeDuc — who also felt strongly that The Post should write about the plagiarism — took printouts of the two stories directly to Leonard Downie Jr., the paper’s executive editor.

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In Pennsylvania and Alaska, a publisher takes infringement to another level

Near the end of last year, a small publishing company made a big bet: it purchased a a group of 19 regional papers servicing remote areas of Alaska. The purchase included a printing plant, but the plan at Allen Total Media was to transition to a digital-only company as a way to service remote villages near King Salmon.

“We will be working closely [with] local news providers to consolidate news from as many as 50 communities to facilitate ease of access, and to lower advertiser costs to reach larger numbers of people,” read the Allen Total Media announcement on Facebook. (The page is now unavailable.)

“Consolidate” was an interesting word choice.

The man behind Allen Total Media is A William “Bill” Allen, a would-be media mogul who has attracted scorn and ridicule from publishers in Pennsylvania for helping himself to other people’s reporting and and “consolidating” it under seemingly fake bylines on his websites.… Read more

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Editor apologizes to Washington Examiner for material his paper lifted

Washington Examiner

Oakland (Mich.) Press Executive Editor Glenn Gilbert apologized to the Washington Examiner for a “word-for-word usage of material” from a Dec. 6 Examiner article. He’d previously told Examiner Managing Editor/Digital Jennifer Peebles, “You’re not going to get an apology” and said his usage of the story, by Zack Colman, was “fair use.”

Reached by email, Gilbert told Poynter “If the accepted standard is use of direct quotes then I should have done that.”

“I define plagiarism as claiming material as your own when it is not — basically the failure to atttribute,” he wrote. “I used three separate attributions as sources of my material, and verified its accuracy from other sources. Except for one paragraph, I feel it is clear to the reader the material is from the Examiner, and is mostly statement of established fact.”… Read more

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Attribution in a digital age is getting murkier. (Depositphotos)

Getting digital attribution right, Part 2

This is the second of a two-part series. Part 1 is here.

Traditional journalism standards have typically governed attribution, and the general rule when using the work of others verbatim is to put quotation marks around the republished content and clearly indicate the source.

But this isn’t the only method of attribution used in the digital world — publishers are trying different tactics, and audience expectations may be changing as well. During a recent Poynter and MediaShift symposium on journalism ethics in the digital age, Tom Rosenstiel, former Project for Excellence in Journalism director and current executive director of the American Press Institute, said that the norms and ethics of journalism “have come from the streets,” adding that “audience has been the determiner of what works.”

Aggregation and curation, two techniques that often overlap, have become popular forms of publishing — and places where problems with attribution often arise.… Read more

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Computer keyboard keys used CTRL, C and V for copy and paste. (Depositphotos)

Getting digital attribution right, Part 1

Control+C, Control+V.

These two simple keystrokes — copy, paste — have created a culture that makes it easy for online publishers to share others’ content and use it in their own work. Much of this sharing and reuse is done appropriately, but sometimes the way a work is credited may not meet traditional standards for attribution.

Most people agree on a definition of plagiarism: It’s a verbatim republication of work that was originally published elsewhere, without clear attribution to the original publication. But ask how to apply that definition to practices and things get murky. Some say any use of more than seven words should be attributed. Others say attribution becomes necessary when more than two sentences are used. Applying that definition to the online publishing world introduces even more gray areas.… Read more

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