Articles about "Police and crime reporting"


Students are escorted as they leave the campus of the Franklin Regional School District after more then a dozen students were stabbed by a knife wielding suspect at nearby Franklin Regional High School on Wednesday, April 9, 2014, in Murrysville, Pa., near Pittsburgh. The suspect, a male student, was taken into custody and is being questioned. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

How to cover what comes next in the Pennsylvania school stabbing case

Pittsburgh-area newsrooms now must live through the reality of covering a mass casualty attack, just as journalists near Fort Hood, Texas, did last week.

They will seek answers about how a student at the Franklin Regional Senior High School in … Read more

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No-knock policy bars TV station staff from rapping on crime suspects’ doors

A Houston television station is telling its staff not to knock on the doors of crime suspects. The station issued a memo saying it is too big a risk to journalists’ safety, but others see the move as a way … Read more

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Reporter undergoes deployment of Taser technology

The Herald-Journal Daniel Gross of the (Spartanburg, S.C.) Herald-Journal took a citizen's police academy course and volunteered to feel what it's like to have a Taser deployed upon him. He remembers the experience:
I recall instantly feeling an endless, relentless, sheer and utter pain jolting through my body. Two sharp prongs felt as if they went deep under my skin, tearing havoc throughout my insides for five continuous seconds. Those five seconds felt like five years.
In the video below, you can see Gross lie on the ground afterward while the cops try to soothe him. "Ready to go again?" one of them asks him, presumably joking. Jim Spellman, at the time a CNN producer, got zapped by a Taser for a 2008 segment. Spellman told Nicole Lapin it "hurt like the dickens.” In his account of the Taser incident, Gross advised readers to "think twice about fleeing from or fighting with an officer" equipped with a Taser. "Take it from me; it's not worth that indescribable pain," he writes. Incidentally, the stun gun's manufacturer objects to the use of the word Taser as a verb or a noun, preferring it be used as an adjective preceding the phrase "conducted electrical weapon." "Instead of, 'The officer shot his taser' use, “The officer deployed his TASER CEW,” the company advises.
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Joe McGinniss, scourge of politicos and chronicler of crime, dies at 71

Associated Press | Los Angeles Times 
Stories about author-journalist Joe McGinniss are re-emerging in the wake of news that he died Monday in a Worcester, Mass., hospital from complications of prostate cancer.

He once moved next door to Sarah Palin to gather material for his unauthorized biography about her, according to the Associated Press. The subject of his best-selling book, "Fatal Vision," sued him, claiming McGinniss tricked him into believing the convicted murderer was innocent. McGinniss' publisher settled out of court for $325,000.

Associated Press reported:
The tall, talkative McGinniss had early dreams of becoming a sports reporter and wrote books about soccer, horse racing and travel. But he was best known for two works that became touchstones in their respective genres — campaign books (”The Selling of the President”) and true crime (”Fatal Vision”). In both cases, he had become fascinated by the difference between public image and private reality.
McGinniss worked for the Philadelphia Inquirer as a columnist while writing the book on Richard Nixon. Nixon's campaign allowed him access, not suspecting he would turn out a book exposing the soul-less marketing of the presidential candidate. He was unflinching with Democrats as well, although his book, "The Last Brother: The Rise and Fall of Teddy Kennedy," attributed imagined thoughts to Ted Kennedy and drew rounds of criticism, the Los Angeles Times reported.

On his website, the Times said, McGinniss wrote:
Penetrating the façade of institutions and people in public life can be an exhilarating but risky business. Sometimes the results are culturally ground-breaking and wildly popular, sometimes disillusioning and distinctly unpopular, sometimes personally heartbreaking.
He is survived among others by his wife Nancy Doherty and his son, author Joe McGinniss Jr.
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Ohio newspaper thief makes daring escape on bicycle

Dayton Daily News
On Sunday at 6 a.m., a man stole an "entire stack of Dayton Daily News that had just been delivered" to a service station, the Dayton Daily News reports. The suspect "was riding a bicycle and carried the newspapers in his hand."

I have no sense of the intensity with which the Dayton Police Department is approaching this investigation, but they could take a tip or ten from the Dallas Morning News, which is perhaps a newspaper thief's biggest nightmare.

In January, Marina Trahan Martinez published security video of someone appearing to steal David Miller's copy of the Morning News. He'd lost 38 papers to the scoundrel, he told Trahan Martinez: “I now sleep with my cell phone beside me as it chimes when the motion detector is triggered.” (more...)
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For 7 years, L.A. Times’ Homicide Report has wrested stories from grim data

We’ve heard a lot about Chris and Laura Amico’s Homicide Watch – and for good reason. The site tracks homicides in Washington, D.C., (and, as of just over a year ago, Chicago and Trenton) from police report to conviction, giving … Read more

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Crime scene

Hyperbolic to sensitive, how news outlets treated dramatic car crash video

The 55-second cell-phone video of an SUV going the wrong way on the Interstate, smashing into a sedan and exploding into a fiery ball that killed five people quickly sky-rocketed to one of the most viewed videos ever on the … Read more

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College papers dropping arrestee names from crime blotters

Those arrested on the University of Connecticut campus this academic year may not feel lucky, but actually they are catching a break. Their arrests are being published in the student-run campus daily newspaper as has been typical for decades, but … Read more

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This July 20, 2012 file photo shows police outside of a Century 16 movie theatre in Aurora, Colo. after a shooting during the showing of a movie. Police and fire officials failed to tell each other when and where rescuers were needed following the Aurora theater shootings, according to reports obtained by the Denver Post. (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski, File)

Learning from prize-winning journalism: how to cover a breaking news story

In Poynter’s e-book, “Secrets of Prize-Winning Journalism,” we highlight and examine 10 award-winning works from 2013 through interviews with their creators.

These works are inspiring. They’re also instructive. Starting with the “secrets” shared with us by their creators, we’ve extracted … Read more

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Four-year-old Jake Richards watches as his sister Stephanie makes signs reading "Remember Aurora," during a remembrance event at which the names of people killed by gun violence in America over the past year were read aloud, at Cherry Creek State Park in Aurora, Colo., on Friday, July 19, 2013. Saturday, July 20 marks one year since the Aurora movie theater shooting rampage, which left 12 dead and 70 wounded. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

A victim’s mother asks journalists not to name killer

Caren Teves wants you journalists to remember her 24-year-old son, Alex, the next time you write a story about a mass shooting. Alex was one of the 11 people who were murdered when a gunman opened fired in a movie … Read more

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