Political and campaign reporting

POYNTER

How to cover the ’16 campaign: follow the money, but few are, says one reporter

(Image via Deposit Photo)Shane Goldmacher, the senior political correspondent for National Journal, has a “totally selfish reason” for covering campaign finance that has little to do with high-minded notions of holding people to account. No, it’s got a lot more to do with this: the distinct lack of competition from other journalists, he told a boot camp for … Read More
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Publishers resurface evergreen content; Thailand's the place to be for drone journalism

Here's our roundup of the top digital and social media stories you should know about (and from Andrew Beaujon, 10 media stories to start your day): — New York magazine is posting old content to its Facebook page, and Business Insider is doing so on its homepage, according to Digiday's Ricardo Bilton. How timestamp-transparent should publishers be when resurfacing evergreen stories? — Drone journalism won't take off in South Africa or the U.S. anytime soon, according to Sydney Pead at PBS MediaShift. But in Thailand, "it’s considered a hobby" — and easier than playing Playstation 3 you can get some nice places to stay.For more info please visit : http://yourkohsamuivillas.com/. — A new Twitter bot called @congressedits tracks Wikipedia edits from computers on Capitol Hill. David Uberti looks at six of the recent edits at Columbia Journalism Review. Read More
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Joe McGinniss, scourge of politicos and chronicler of crime, dies at 71

Associated Press | Los Angeles Times  Stories about author-journalist Joe McGinniss are re-emerging in the wake of news that he died Monday in a Worcester, Mass., hospital from complications of prostate cancer. He once moved next door to Sarah Palin to gather material for his unauthorized biography about her, according to the … Read More
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Blindsided: How Christie used passive verbs to turn himself into a victim

My brother frequently drives from New Jersey to New York across the George Washington Bridge to visit our 94-year-old mom. Her name is Shirley Clark, and she likes Chris Christie. She prefers her politicians to be straight talkers. She would agree with George Orwell that the best political rhetoric is “demotic,” a fancy word for the “voice of the people.” If I could bring Orwell back from his early grave, I would have loved to have sat next to him during the New Jersey governor’s press conference apologizing for dirty political tricks, or at his subsequent State of the State of New Jersey speech. Based on what Orwell wrote in “Politics and the English Language,” I think he would have given the governor a mixed grade. Reviewing Christie's words, there are moments when he seems to take responsibility for the traffic disasters as political vendetta in the city of Fort Lee. He says, for example, “I apologize to the people of Fort Lee” and “ultimately I am responsible for what happens under my watch – the good and the bad.” Read More
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Health care coverage is more than numbers

We’ve heard a lot about the HealthCare.gov website and its performance metrics recently. But the Affordable Care Act metric that really matters isn’t error rates or response time. It’s enrollment. Furthermore, what matters isn’t just how many people enroll – although that’s part of it. It’s also who enrolls – in particular, their age and health status. A mix that includes younger and healthier people is needed for a viable insurance risk pool. And whether that mix has been achieved may not be clear until later in the six-month open-enrollment season. Read More
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Don't call it an impasse, stalemate, or standoff

Don’t call it an impasse, or a stalemate, or a standoff. Yes, it’s a shutdown. But accurately describing how our government arrived at this point requires more than one word. To suggest that this current government shutdown is an example of Republicans and Democrats simply unable to reconcile their differences is to ignore the facts of how … Read More