PolitiFact

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Fact-checkers around the world agree on shared code of principles

Thirty-five organizations from 27 countries have signed a new code of principles that emphasizes the importance of transparency and a non-partisan approach. Signatories include Africa Check, Chequeado, El Objetivo on La Sexta, Factcheck.org, Full Fact, PolitiFact, Snopes and the Washington Post's Fact Checker. Around the world, the unholy trinity of partisan news outlets, social media echo chambers and fact-challenged … Read More
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The Washington Post, PolitiFact and Factcheck.org are using this widget to make facts more shareable

The presidential campaign in the United States has led to oodles of commentary about the importance and effects of fact-checking political figures. Angie Holan, the editor of PolitiFact, encapsulated the zeitgeist aptly in the headline of her recent article "Fact-checking 2016: This is gonna be messy." (PolitiFact is a project of the Tampa Bay Times, which is … Read More
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Minnesota Public Radio shows how to put the public into fact checking

"Ben Wiener will be another vote against Medicare." Or so claimed a 2012 campaign flier targeting the Republican candidate in a close Minnesota legislative race. The claim was false, according to Minnesota Public Radio's PoliGraph. As the political fact checker noted, the state House would have no real say over federal efforts to fix a funding … Read More
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Academic research: 'Huge growth' in fact checking by the media

As some wring their hands about a decline in newsroom resources and quality, there’s a “huge growth” in fact checking in the coverage of politics, according to a new academic study. Several thousand papers were delivered at the Midwest Political Science Association conference, including, “Where and Why Do Journalists Fact-Check.” The paper contends that reporters now fact-check politicians … Read More
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The extreme ratings of fact-checkers around the world

This article was republished with permission by the Duke Reporters' Lab. Claire Ballentine is a student researcher at the Lab. A 2015 census of fact-checkers reveals the odd names they use for the most ridiculous falsehoods. FactCheckEU calls them “Insane Whoppers.” The Voice of San Diego uses “Huckster Propaganda.” Honolulu Civil Beat refers to them as “Screaming … Read More
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Yes, Virginia, it is OK for a writer to play with the form

As a boy, my favorite story genre was the cowboy movie.  As I got a little older, I left Hopalong Cassidy behind in favor of parodies of cowboy movies, the kind of thing Mad magazine produced or Mel Brooks perfected in Blazing Saddles. No doubt, good writers learn how to fulfill the requirements of a particular writing form, whether … Read More
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Creating new forms of journalism that put readers in charge

It’s been 20 years since the Internet began to disrupt journalism. It has turned our business upside down, but it’s also given us a new canvas to invent different ways of presenting information. It’s time to start reimagining the news story. Last week, four of us gathered in a windowless conference room in New York to explore what … Read More
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Researchers find politicians may fear fact-checkers

In the months before the 2012 election, state legislators in nine states received letters from two political scientists. “We are writing to let you know about an important research project,” the letters began. It wasn't just a letter letting them know about the project — the letters were a core piece of the research, as were the politicians themselves. Some of the letters informed legislators that PolitiFact had set up shop in their state, and that the researchers were conducting work related to “how elected officials in your state are responding to the presence of this fact-checking organization during this campaign season.” It also told them that, “Politicians who lie put their reputations and careers at risk, but only when those lies are exposed.” Read More
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Fact-checkers, copy editors on why they'll be affected by Michele Bachmann's retirement

U.S. Rep Michele Bachmann announced early Wednesday that she would not seek her seat next year, an announcement that will land hard on two constituencies: Fact-checkers and copy editors. "She was great to cover because she was consistently and unapologetically wrong," Washington Post fact-checker Glenn Kessler told Poynter in an email. "But others will fill the breach, I am sure!" In a post bidding her adieu, Kessler wrote that Bachmann's absence "will leave the Capitol a much less interesting place to fact check." Read More