Pulitzer Prizes

Investigative Reporting Pulitzer entries up 50 percent since magazines were allowed in

Since The Pulitzer Prizes changed the rules to allow online and print magazines, the contest has seen a 50 percent increase in investigative entries compared to last year, Mike Pride, the administrator of The Pulitzer Prizes, said in an email.

Feature submissions, meanwhile, have seen a 21 percent increase, Pride said. The number of entries for all categories, which usually number around 1,100, this year totals 1,191.

Investigative reporting entries, which last year totaled 75, this year number 112, Pride said. Feature submissions, which numbered 127 in 2014, increased to 154.

In December, The Pulitzer Prizes announced it was opening the competition to online and print magazines for the first time. Pride told Poynter at the time that the change was meant to recognize an increasing amount of magazines reporting under tighter deadline pressure. Read more

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Glenn Greenwald will live-blog the torture report

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. U.S. Senate will release torture report today

    Glenn Greenwald will live-blog. (The Intercept) | Former intelligence machers launch a website to respond to criticism. (Foreign Policy)

  2. Chris and Guy's press tour

    New Republic owner Chris Hughes and CEO Guy Vidra went on a press blitz Monday. Vidra told me remaining staffers at the in-turmoil publication were enthusiastic about its new direction after a Q&A on Friday. (Poynter) | He told Joe Nocera Vox was something like what he wanted to build under the New Republic brand. Nocera then gets browsing. "After we spoke, I went to the Vox website. I scrolled down until I saw a headline that stopped me cold. 'Everybody farts,' it read.

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Pulitzers

Pulitzers open up to magazines

The Pulitzer Prizes announced Monday two substantial changes in a press release:

  • The contest will consider entries from online and print magazines for two categories: investigative reporting and feature writing.
  • News organizations can nominate journalists who belong to partnering organizations — even if the organization does not itself qualify to compete for the prizes.

Pulitzer Prize administrator Mike Pride said the change reflects the reality that a growing number of print and digital magazines are reporting on current events under tighter deadline pressure.

“Things are changing in the world of journalism, and the Pulitzers I think have tried, quite judiciously, to change with them,” Pride said. “And I think this is the latest iteration of that.”

There are a couple caveats: For magazines to qualify, they must embody “highest journalistic principles,” a standard for which the prizes has no fixed criteria, Pride said. Read more

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Polk Awards

Did the government throw shade on latest Greenwald scoop?

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories. Also, from Sam Kirkland, your digital morning stuff, and from Kristen Hare, a look at journalism outside the U.S.

  1. Did the government try to stink up Glenn Greenwald’s latest story? The American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee’s national president, Samer Khalaf, says “It wasn’t that they were saying it was false. They were saying they can’t respond to a story that wasn’t out yet.” (The Washington Post) | The Intercept “began hearing about Justice Department officials attempting to discredit our story long before that [ADC] meeting took place.” (The Intercept) | Related: Bart Gellman answers objections to his latest NSA story, which he wrote with Julie Tate and Ashkan Soltani. (The Washington Post)
  2. Remembering John Seigenthaler, who died Friday: The Tennessean’s package | Former Poynter President Karen Dunlap remembers Seigenthaler.
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Bloomberg publications await launch dates, alt-weeklies get together on a story

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Where are Bloomberg’s new verticals? Its politics site will launch in October, “30 days before the 2014 Midterms,” Joe Pompeo reports. Bloomberg Business, Bloomberg Markets and Bloomberg Pursuits have “no hard launch dates,” Pompeo writes. “‘It’s still mostly chatter about strategy with no product being delivered,’ said one executive who was not authorized to speak on the record. ‘People want to see something on the table, basically.’” (Capital)
  2. Pulitzers have a new boss: Former Concord Monitor Editor Mike Pride will become the administrator of the Pulitzer Prizes this September. (NYT) | Pride talks with Kristen Hare: “What the Pulitzers really have to do, like every other institution associated with journalism, they have to change with the times and the times are changing very quickly.” (Poynter)
  3. Brown Moses is launching a site for crowdsourced reporting: Bellingcat will give citizen journalists “a chance to learn what I’ve learnt over the last two years by trial and error,” Eliot Higgins, a.k.a.
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Pulitzer names Mike Pride new administrator

Mike Pride (Submitted)

Mike Pride (Submitted)

Mike Pride is the new administrator of the Pulitzer Prizes, Columbia University announced Tuesday. Pride, the former editor of the Concord Monitor “led his small New Hampshire newspaper to national prominence and served as co-chair of the Pulitzer Prize Board,” according to the press release.

Pride, 67, became editor of the Monitor in 1983 after serving as managing editor. Under his leadership the Monitor won the New England Newspaper of the Year Award 19 times, as well as numerous national awards for excellence. The paper was cited by Time magazine and the Columbia Journalism Review as one of the best papers in the country. In 2008, the Monitor won the Pulitzer Prize for Feature Photography.

“Mike Pride is the ideal candidate to take the Pulitzer Prizes into their next phase,” said Danielle Allen, a professor of social science at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, N.J., and the Pulitzer Board chair who led the search committee that tapped Pride.

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Reuters will defend ‘vigorously’ if Thai police move to arrest journalists

Agence France-Presse | Phuketwan

Reuters journalists “will be summoned in the next few days to acknowledge defamation charges” in Thailand, Agence France-Presse reports. “If they do not come, arrest warrants will be issued,” Lt. Somkid On-Jan of Phuket’s Vichit Police Station told AFP. Somkid didn’t name the journalists, but Reuters’ Stuart Grudgings and Jason Szep wrote an article about Thai authorities selling members of a Muslim minority group in Myanmar to human traffickers. It was part of a series that won a Pulitzer Prize.

“We’re aware that a captain in the Royal Thai Navy filed a criminal complaint against Reuters and two Reuters journalists, Stuart Grudgings and Jason Szep, arising out of the Rohingya coverage, and that the complaint alleges violations of the Computer Crimes Act,” David Crundwell, Thomson Reuters’ head of corporate affairs, told Poynter in an email. Read more

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Lucky Peach gets five James Beard Awards

James Beard Awards

The food quarterly Lucky Peach got five James Beard Awards Friday night.

The magazine, which is no longer published by McSweeney’s, won for John Birdsall’s essay “America, Your Food Is So Gay,” Lisa Hanawalt’s “On the Trail with Wylie,” John Jeremiah Sullivan’s “I Placed a Jar in Tennessee,” Fuchsia Dunlop’s “Dick Soup” and Francis Lam’s “A Day on Long Island with Alex Lee.”

Washington Post reporter Eli Saslow also got an award for his series about food stamps. The work won a Pulitzer Prize for explanatory reporting last month. (While speaking to his newsroom about the award, Saslow said sources on stories like these are “the ones who take the huge risk.”)

Some of the other media awards: Read more

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NABJ names Stephen Henderson 2014 Journalist of the Year

National Association of Black Journalists

Stephen Henderson, editorial page editor at the Detroit Free Press and a 2014 Pulitzer Prize winner, has been named the 2014 Journalist of the Year by the National Association of Black Journalists. In a press release Friday, NABJ noted that Henderson won the Pulitzer for commentary, according to the citation, “on the financial crisis facing his hometown, written with passion and a stirring sense of place, sparing no one in their critique.”

“Stephen Henderson’s career has been one marked by incisive, detailed reporting about politics, policy and urban affairs,” NABJ President Bob Butler said. “As an editorial writer and columnist, Stephen has a unique voice which helps punctuate his arguments and compels readers to seriously reflect on the issues facing them locally, nationally and globally, often motivating them to seek solutions to the problems discussed.”

Henderson, who has also worked at The Baltimore Sun and the Chicago Tribune, worked at the Free Press in the 90s, NABJ reports, and returned in 2007. Read more

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Despite ABC News/CPI blowup, here’s how news partnerships can work

Journalism organizations might get discouraged about joining partnerships after the public meltdown of the partnership between ABC News and The Center for Public Integrity this week.

CPI’s reporter Chris Hamby won a Pulitzer Prize for stories that exposed how coal miners who were dying from black-lung disease were being unfairly denied health benefits. ABC wanted to get some of the credit for the investigation. What followed was a nasty exchange that played out here on Poynter Online all week.

But let’s not forget the upside to great investigative journalists from different organizations working together. ABC and CPI did affect lives, expose wrongdoing and reach a national audience that neither could have done alone.

Some of the most important journalism in recent years has been the product of partnerships. Read more

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