Articles about "Quartz"


Career Beat: Ad Age gets new editorial director

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • Eli Lake is leaving The Daily Beast, where he’s a national security correspondent. Josh Rogin is leaving The Daily Beast, where he’s a senior correspondent. (Huffington Post)
  • Simon Dumenco is editorial director at Advertising Age. Previously, he was a columnist there. (Ad Age)
  • Fran Unsworth is now director of the World Service Group at the BBC. She’s deputy director of news and current affairs. (The Guardian)
  • Chris Moody will be a senior correspondent for CNN Politics Digital. Previously, he was a political correspondent for Yahoo News. (Politico)
  • Jeffrey Schneider is founding his own PR firm, Schneider Global Strategy. He’s a senior vice president and spokesperson at ABC News. (ABC)
  • Sruthijith KK is now editor at Huffington Post India. Previously, he was editor of Quartz India. (Medianama)

Job of the day: U.S. News and World Report is looking for a Congress reporter. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs)

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Read what happens when a bunch of over 30s find out how Millennials handle their money   Quartz

Storytelling experiment: Quartz publishes internal conversation

Your newsroom surely has been through the drill: an editor reaches out to some folks with an idea for a story. The cc line grows and grows as “stakeholders” chime in. By the end of the thread (or the day), you have a treatise on proposed subject.

But no story.

I thought of all those unpublished pearls today as we ran this story yesterday and promptly saw it soar to the top of our “most popular” list. As the ideas editor at Quartz, the 2-year-old global economy site of the Atlantic Media Co., it didn’t surprise me that we were pulling back the curtain and letting readers into our process and thinking. But as a reader (age 38, if you must know), the message of the transcript — that millennials are very public about their spending habits — did surprise and inform.

Screengrab of article from Quartz' site.

Screengrab of article from Quartz’ site.

I wondered what would happen to a chat like ours in a legacy newsroom. Would it have been given to a personal finance reporter as an assignment about “kids these days?” Would it have yielded a feature on the service Venmo? Or would it have — as so many of those great ideas that get ruminated and marinated over email or chat — stayed in our inboxes to die?

You might say that your newsroom doesn’t have the ability or desire to offer such transparency into the sausage-making of ideas. That the white space on your printed page only has room for 700 linear words.

The popularity of this post begs a reconsideration of that thinking. What we offered here was insight and authenticity, a “trend” story that doesn’t talk up or down to readers, but lets them truly feel a part of the conversation. Read more

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Career Beat: AP gets new global news manager for weekends

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • James Nord is now a political correspondent for The Associated Press. Previously, he was a political reporter at MinnPost. (AP)
  • Evan Berland is now global news manager for weekends at the AP. Previously, he was deputy editor for the eastern United States. (AP)
  • Mitra Kalita is now an adjunct faculty member at Poynter. She is Quartz’ ideas editor. (Poynter)
  • Catherine Gundersen is now managing editor of Marie Claire. She was editorial business manager at GQ. (Fishbowl NY)
  • Jacob Rascon is now a correspondent at NBC News. Previously, he was a reporter for KNBC in Los Angeles. (TV Spy)

Job of the day: The Wall Street Journal is looking for a banking editor. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs)

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Mitra Kalita joins Poynter as an adjunct

Quartz ideas editor Mitra Kalita will join the Poynter Institute as an adjunct faculty member. Before Quartz, Kalita worked at The Wall Street Journal, and she’s also worked for the Associated Press and The Washington Post.

Mitra Kalita.

Mitra Kalita.

Kalita first came to Poynter when she was a college student. “A lot has changed in our profession since then and I’ve made the transition from legacy media to a digitally native, innovative startup in Quartz,” Kalita says in the release. “But a lot hasn’t; the Poynter rules I learned that summer in the late 1990s still apply.”

Full release:

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (October 2, 2014) –Mitra Kalita, one of the nation’s leading digital innovators and current Quartz ideas editor, is joining The Poynter Institute’s adjunct faculty.

Kalita, who was named one of Folio’s Top 100 Women in Media for 2014, is also an author, a senior manager for three startups and is a frequent lecturer on digital storytelling.

Prior to her current position as Quartz ideas editor, she managed The Wall Street Journal’s reporting on the Great Recession. She also spearheaded the launch of a local news section for New York City and covered the housing crisis. Additionally, she was a driving force behind the launch of Mint, a New Delhi business paper. Other previous editorial roles include her time spent on staff at the Washington Post, the Associated Press and Newsday. She also holds a position as adjunct professor of journalism at St. John’s and Columbia universities, and is a past president of the South Asian Journalists Association.

“Mitra is a perfect fit for Poynter’s teaching team, and her appointment symbolizes the institute’s new strategic focus on digital innovation,” said Tim Franklin, president of The Poynter Institute. “Mitra has thrived at top legacy news organizations, and now at a growing digital operation, Quartz. At the same time, she’s also gained experience teaching at Columbia University and St. John’s. That background uniquely positions Mitra for Poynter. Mitra also is one of the nation’s leaders when it comes to innovative digital storytelling. We couldn’t be happier to have Mitra join our team.”

Kalita began her affiliation with Poynter as a college student. “My introduction to Poynter came during a seminar for college editors,” she said. “It was there I picked up lifelong lessons on ethics, storytelling, diversity, and management—all through the complicated lens of a journalist’s desire for fairness, compassion, and accountability. A lot has changed in our profession since then and I’ve made the transition from legacy media to a digitally native, innovative startup in Quartz. But a lot hasn’t; the Poynter rules I learned that summer in the late 1990s still apply.

I am so honored to now be able to give back a little to this institution as an adjunct faculty member. As has always been tradition at Poynter, I expect to gain as much from participants as they might from me. And I look forward to figuring out together not just how our industry will survive but thrive.”

“Mitra’s an ideal complement to the Poynter faculty,” said Kelly McBride, Poynter’s vice president of academic programs. “She’s smart, entrepreneurial and dynamic. And she has the great combination of journalism chops, startup expertise and teaching experience to enhance our curriculum and help us lead the journalism industry.”

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Forecast: Digital ad revenue to jump 17% this year, magazine ad revenue to fall 11%

mediawiremorningWednesday already? Here we go.

  1. Digital ad revenue to pass TV in 2017: According to Magna Global forecasts, “television revenues are expected to grow 2.2% this year,” Nathalie Tadena writes. “Newspaper and magazine ad revenue are expected to decline 8.9% and 11% respectively, while digital ad revenues are expected to jump 17% this year to $50 billion.” (The Wall Street Journal) | “The research firm declared digital ad revenue will hit $72 billion by 2017, pulling slightly ahead of television at $70.5 billion.” (The Wrap)
  2. The perils of freelance war reporting: GlobalPost went “above and beyond” in working for James Foley’s release before he was killed by Islamic State militants, according to Medill’s Ellen Shearer. “But other freelancers may not get that kind of backing or have access to the infrastructure that a staff journalist would, she said.” (AP via NYT) | Freelance journalist Austin Tice, who has been missing for two years, is believed to be held by the Syrian government, Lara Jakes reports. (AP) | Previously: Tice “disappeared on Aug. 14, 2012, while reporting on Syria for The Washington Post and McClatchy, among other outlets.” (Poynter) | Related: Peter Theo Curtis, who was freed in Syria by extremist group al-Nusra Front on Sunday, has returned home to Boston and reunited with his mother. (AP)
  3. Online “spiral of silence”: In a Pew study, researchers found that 86 percent of U.S. adults were willing to talk about surveillance issues in-person, while just 42 percent of Twitter and Facebook users were willing to post about them on those social networks. “Overall, the findings indicate that in the Snowden case, social media did not provide new forums for those who might otherwise remain silent to express their opinions and debate issues.” (Pew Research Center) | Another interpretation, from Chris Ip: “A hesitancy to share online could actually be a valuable restraint for someone who would otherwise have shot an unthinking opinion into the digital ether, safe in the knowledge their network of followers would agree with their views.” (Columbia Journalism Review)
  4. “You could teach a whole course on Ferguson”: “We’ve seen it in other cities,” Amber Hinsley, assistant professor at St. Louis University, tells Kristen Hare. “But for St. Louis, this is really our first big story that broke on Twitter. You saw it unfold on Twitter.” (Poynter)
  5. Did you know: The domain .TV is owned by Tuvalu, a South Pacific nation, and it’s becoming a big deal for branding as sites look to capitalize on appetite for online video, Noam Cohen reports. (The New York Times)
  6. New Quartz homepage aimed at loyal visitors: It’s modeled after the site’s newsletter, Zach Seward tells Joseph Lichterman: “It’s so new, and there aren’t enough analogous products out there to really tell if we should be expecting people to just be twitchy and checking it all the time, or if they have one time in their day when they check it and it’s just that once a day.” (Nieman Lab)
  7. Nationwide Time Warner Cable outage: The Internet was down between 4:30 a.m. and 6 a.m. during “routine network maintenance,” Brian Stelter reports. Many of the homes served by TWC are in Los Angeles and New York: “That made Wednesday’s outage more noticeable, because it affected journalists and the people who employ them.” Good point. (CNN)
  8. Bigger iPad on the way? iPhones are getting bigger this year, and soon there will be a 12.9-inch version of the iPad, too. Sales of the tablet have fallen for two straight quarters. (Bloomberg) | It sounds awkward and way too big for a tablet, but Steve Kovach writes it could be a “dream device” by basically being a less “clunky and confusing” Surface Pro 3. (Business Insider) | Related: Walt Mossberg still loves tablets. (Re/code)
  9. Newspaper front page of the day: The Virginian-Pilot, selected by Kristen Hare. (Newseum)
    VA_VP
     
  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Mignon Fogarty is now the Donald W. Reynolds Chair in Media Entrepreneurship at the University of Nevada, Reno. She is the founder of the Quick and Dirty Tips network. (Poynter) | Tom Cibrowski is now senior vice president of news programs, newsgathering and special events at ABC News. He was a senior executive producer at “Good Morning America.” (ABC News) | Michael Corn will be senior executive producer at “Good Morning America.” Previously, he was executive producer of “World News.” Almin Karamehmedovic will be executive producer at “World News.” Previously, he was executive producer at “Nightline.” (ABC News) | Kylie Dixon is now co-anchor for “2une In” at WBRZ in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Previously, she was an anchor at KXII in Sherman, Texas. (businessreport.com) | Les Vann is now general manager of WISH in Indianapolis. Previously, he was general manager of WJCL in Savannah, Georgia. Steve Doerr will be acting general manager for WJCL. Previously, he was northeast region vice president for Smith Media. (Lin Media) | Job of the Day: The Associated Press is looking for a news editor in Nashville, Tennessee. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would you like this roundup each morning? This week, please email me: skirkland@poynter.org. You can reach your regular roundup guy at: abeaujon@poynter.org


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Facebook and Twitter Applications on Ipad

Times of India publisher to staffers: Give us your social media passwords if you’re posting news

mediawiremorningHey, it’s Tuesday. Media stories coming your way!

  1. Strict, strange social-media policy at Times of India: Bennett, Coleman and Company Ltd staffers have been told not to post news stories from their personal social media accounts; instead, they must create company-authorized accounts, according to Quartz India. Even weirder: the company — which publishes The Times of India and The Economic Times — “will possess log-in credentials to such accounts and will be free to post any material to the account without journalists’ knowledge,” Sruthijith KK reports. (Quartz India) | Quartz-related: How often should a site launch a redesign, like Quartz just did? Mario Garcia: “The answer varies, and there is a basic principle I follow: redesign (and/or rethink) when you need it.” (Garcia Media)
  2. NYT’s controversial Michael Brown profile: New York Times public editor Margaret Sullivan writes that calling Michael Brown “no angel” in a profile of the 18-year-old killed by police in Ferguson, Missouri, was “a blunder.” (Public Editor’s Journal) | Times national editor Alison Mitchell told Erik Wemple that the phrase derived from the story’s lead, which told an anecdote about Brown seeing a vision of an angel. (Erik Wemple) | The Times has used the term “no angel” in the past to refer to Al Capone, Whitey Bulger and one of the Columbine killers. (Vanity Fair) | The profile was written by John Eligon. (The New York Times) | Austin Kleon’s “newspaper blackout” poem from Monday:
  3. Facebook cracks down on clickbait: How does Facebook define clickbait? It’s “when a publisher posts a link with a headline that encourages people to click to see more, without telling them much information about what they will see.” (Facebook) | “Algorithm tweaks don’t change the bottom line: Facebook is in charge of what you see,” Mathew Ingram writes. (GigaOm) | Upworthy’s Adam Mordecai is “stoked” about the news. (Twitter) | “We welcome a focus from Facebook on engaged time,” an Upworthy spokesperson told John McDermott. (Digiday) | Previously: Upworthy released code for its “attention minutes” metric meant to go beyond clicks. (Poynter) | Previously: Facebook’s Mike Hudack famously — and ironically? — ranted against the shallowness of U.S. news in May. (Poynter)

  4. How American journalist was released in Syria: Before Peter Theo Curtis was freed on Sunday, Qatar “had been working on the case for months at the request of the Obama administration.” David Bradley, chairman and owner of Atlantic Media Co., and a former FBI agent had traveled to Doha to meet with the Qataris, Adam Goldman and Karen DeYoung report. Officials insist no ransom was paid. (Washington Post)
  5. An ‘emotional cauldron’ after James Foley’s death: “When the press isn’t panicked about the Islamic State, it’s confused,” Jack Shafer writes. “Enemies exist, of course. But boogeymen don’t.” (Reuters)
  6. Ken Doctor on Gannett’s “newsrooms of the future”: “It’s easy to paint the laying off/buying out of veterans as simply getting rid of the digitally clueless. There’s some of that, of course, but this is mainly a financial exercise, as is most of the change we see sweeping the American news industry this year.” (Nieman Lab) | Previously: Gannett exec: Goal of reshuffled newsrooms is to invest “fewest resources necessary in production.” (Poynter)
  7. AP expands food columns: “Food Network star Melissa d’Arabian will join AP’s team of kitchen authorities, taking over ‘The Healthy Plate,’ a weekly column aimed at helping home cooks discover the healthier side of everyday ingredients,” according to a press release. (AP)
  8. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: John Batter will be CEO of Gracenote. Previously, he was CEO of M-GO. (Tech Crunch) | Mark Jurkowitz is the owner of the Outer Banks Sentinel in Nags Head, North Carolina. Previously, he was the associate director of Pew Research Center’s journalism project. (Romenesko) | Jon Ward is a senior political correspondent with Yahoo News. Previously, he was a political reporter for the Huffington Post. (Politico) | Shauna Rempel is now a social media strategist for Global News. Previously, she was social media and technology editor at the Toronto Star. (Muck Rack) | Chris Tisch is now business editor for the Tampa Bay Times. Previously, he was assistant metro editor there. (Tampa Bay Times) | Nathan Lump is now editor of Travel and Leisure. Previously, he was director of branded content at Condé Nast. (Time Inc.) | Job of the day: The San Antonio Express-News is looking for a web producer. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would you like this roundup each morning? This week, please email me: skirkland@poynter.org. You can reach your regular roundup guy at: abeaujon@poynter.org


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American Freed Syria

American journalist released in Syria; British officials ID man believed to be Foley’s killer

mediawiremorningHappy Monday. Andrew Beaujon is taking a much-deserved vacation. Here are some media stories.

  1. American journalist freed in Syria: On Sunday, UN peacekeepers received Peter Theo Curtis, who was kidnapped in 2012, and turned him over to the U.S. “According to German newspaper die Welt am Sonntag, ‘something was given in return for his release’.” Curtis was “reportedly held by the al-Nusra Front or by splinter groups allied with the al-Qaeda-affiliated group.” (Al Jazeera) | Previously: The U.S. declined to pay ransom for James Foley, who was killed by Islamic State militants last week. (Poynter)
  2. UK intel ID’s person believed to be Foley’s killer: And “sources have said that rampant media speculation about the identity of the killer may be off base.” (NBC News) | Medill professor Ellen Shearer on Foley’s return to the front lines: “Passion prevailed. Jim wasn’t a desk guy.” (Washington Post)
  3. Carr makes peace with Vice: In 2011, when David Carr was “bumping bellies with [Vice CEO Shane] Smith over whose coverage was worthier, I failed to recognize that in a world that is hostile to journalism in all its forms, where dangerous conflicts seem to jump off every other day, you can’t be uppity about where your news comes from.” (New York Times) | Previously: Vice CEO: Woodward and Bernstein used to be punks, too. (Poynter) | Here’s the Carr-Smith showdown from “Page One.” (YouTube)
  4. “The reality is, magazines as a print business will ultimately die,” says Time Inc. CEO Joe Ripp in Gabriel Sherman’s profile of the recently spun-off company. “If we don’t transform this company, someone else will come in and do it.” (New York magazine)
  5. The homepageless Quartz gets a homepage: Visitors to qz.com will now see an “efficient briefing on global business news, called the Brief.” But it’s not “a sea of headlines,” Zach Seward writes in his introduction to the redesigned site. (Quartz) | Previously: The homepage is dead, and the social web has won—even at the New York Times. (Quartz) | Previously: 3 takeaways from the ‘death of the homepage’ and The New York Times innovation report. (Poynter)
  6. Has NYT subscriber growth stalled? Four years ago, a consulting firm estimated for The New York Times that it could reach 800,000 to 900,000 digital-only subscribers. “The problem is, the Times already hit the low end of that projection in June with 831,000 paying online readers,” Edmund Lee reports. (Re/code)
  7. Is it time to ditch native news apps? App use is growing more quickly than mobile Web use, but John McDermott argues news sites can best take advantage of that by having mobile-friendly sites that can be linked to in the apps people are actually using, like Facebook. (Digiday) | Previously: App use dominates mobile browser use, but what does that mean for news content? (Poynter)
  8. ‘We need more of a coffeehouse conversation’: That’s how NBC News president Deborah Turness explains her vision for “Meet the Press” to Bill Carter. Turness tried to make things work with host David Gregory, but “we weren’t able to build a new vision together in the end.” (New York Times) | Previously: Gregory’s replacement is Chuck Todd. (CNN)
  9. Paul Krugman saw Arcade Fire at Barclays Center: “I have to admit that the sound in a big arena is a bit murky — the bass was too loud — so it helped if you already knew and loved all the songs, which I did.” (New York Times)
  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Ed Reams will be news director for WKOW in Madison, Wisconsin. Previously, he was assistant news director at WISN in Milwaukee. (Wheeler Report) | Clayton Clark will be a communication specialist for St. Agnes Hospital. Previously, he was a reporter for KMPH in Fresno. (Fresno Bee) | Bob Kravitz starts today as a columnist and sports reporter at WTHR in Indianapolis. Previously, he was a sports columnist at The Indianapolis Star. (Bob Kravitz) | Job of the day: Poynter’s News University is looking for an interactive learning fellow. Get your résumés in! (Poynter) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org.

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would like this roundup each morning? This week, please email me: skirkland@poynter.org. You can reach your regular roundup guy at: abeaujon@poynter.org


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Time.com’s bounce rate down 15 percentage points since adopting continuous scroll

Three major news website redesigns this year look very different but have an important feature in common: articles that seamlessly transition to new content, without requiring readers to click or tap headlines and then wait for new pages to load.

This “continuous scroll” strategy for news sites’ article pages is gaining momentum. It’s been adopted by Time.com, NBCNews.com and LATimes.com, reflecting the fact that direct homepage traffic is waning (see the New York Times innovation report), and traffic from social media (particularly Facebook) just keeps growing.

So as readers increasingly enter sites from “side doors” or article pages, media organizations are trying to figure out how to get them to stick around. Pew recently found that visitors from Facebook are far less engaged than direct visitors. Here’s how sites that relaunched in the first half of 2014 are addressing that problem by making use of the continuous scroll (aka infinite scroll) feature in their article pages:

Time.com

Since its March redesign, Time.com’s bounce rate — the percentage of visitors who leave the site after viewing only one page — has declined by 15 percentage points, according to managing editor Edward Felsenthal. The percentage of desktop visitors going to another piece of content jumped 21 percentage points between February and May.

Felsenthal attributed that to the continuous scroll, which provides a clickless path for readers to reach another story. He said the left rail, which serves as a “traveling homepage” of links to the top stories of the moment, also helped.

The fact that Time.com queues up top stories, not related stories, is crucial to the site’s strategy for serving social visitors, Felsenthal said: “In many ways the major objective of our redesign was to showcase for those users the full Time offering.”

That seems to acknowledge that much of what attracts social media readers to the site initially might not be the content deemed most editorially important. So now, readers going to the site for a story that may not be what you’d expect from Time.com…

… will scroll into Time’s more substantive top stories once they get to the bottom of the article. (For what it’s worth, Felsenthal told Digiday, “We don’t want to do really clickbait-y Facebook posts, because it’s just not what the brand’s about. But we do want to tease.”)

World news typically doesn’t receive as much social engagement as softer content does, but Time’s redesign means more visitors will at least be exposed to hard news. Post-redesign, Felsenthal said, “The mix of our top 10 articles is more reflective of where we want to be.”

NBC News

The redesigned NBC News takes a different approach from Time. Article pages transition into related stories, not top stories. And some stories are compiled into “storylines,” so if you’re interested in “hot cars and kids,” you can read a stack of more than 30 stories.

Mobile page views in June were up 30 percent over the previous 12-month average, according to an NBC News spokesperson. On average, NBC News readers on desktop and mobile are seeing nearly 20 percent more pages per visit than before the site’s February redesign.

Los Angeles Times

The LA Times redesign is less seamless than the other two in terms of transitioning quickly to the next piece of content. There’s a choose-your-own-adventure quality to the layout; non-blog stories transition into a section page instead of another article page based on which section you choose:

latscroll

That gives readers more control over where the site takes them next, but requiring readers to choose what they see next adds some friction that the other sites lack.

A spokesperson for the LA Times said it was too early to share specifics about how the newspaper’s new site is performing. She summed up the goals of the May redesign:

• Eradicating print-centric and antiquated web concepts, such as “the fold,” “the jump,” “endless clicking” and “the dead end” with endless scrolling and multi-directional navigation
• Seamlessly pathing readers from one piece of content to the next, with section fronts and article pages anchored by a row of thumbnails that automatically transport readers to related coverage or other sections

Quartz, Fortune, and Cosmopolitan

The homepage-less Quartz is a clear influence here, particularly for Time. Whatever page you arrive on via social media occupies the top spot in the story stack, with top news — not related stories — below. Editorial news judgment plays a big role in the reader’s experience.

Quartz senior editor Zach Seward said it’s nice to see others emulate one of his site’s signature features: “It must mean we’re onto something.” He also said he doesn’t like the term “infinite scroll”:

The intent is to help users who get to the end of a story but want to keep reading. Some sites have dead ends, others create paralysis of choice. We choose to quietly suggest just one more story, which users can easily scroll into or just ignore. It’s all about that one moment rather some kind of infinite experience.

Seward recently told Digiday’s Ricardo Bilton that Quartz estimates “readers view about 50 percent more stories per visit than they would without the option to scroll.” And, Seward said, “When people choose to read another story on Quartz, about 80 percent do so by scrolling, as opposed to clicking on a headline.”

Time Inc.’s Money and Fortune have also adopted the Quartz-inspired Time.com template for their redesigns. And at the “sexy new Cosmopolitan.com”, a long stack of related stories is presented to readers at the bottom of article pages.

The article page is the new homepage, so what goes on underneath articles seems to be the paramount concern when redesigning a media site in 2014. Some, like Time and Quartz, choose to “quietly suggest” a particular story. Others, like the LA Times and Cosmo, are using the space below stories to offer lots of choices for readers. But all of them have redesigned with an eye toward that second click or page view.


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Quartz plans to ‘add some fuel to the rocket ship’ with new hires

Quartz is “planning to add some fuel to the rocket ship,” Publisher Jay Lauf and Editor-in-Chief Kevin Delaney told staffers in a memo this morning. It’s hiring more than 20 new jobs, 16 of which are on its jobs page, including four editorial spots. (The company will add more positions to the page this week, a spokesperson tells Poynter.)

Memo: Read more

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Man watching tv. Photo from behind. Editable copyspace at the sc

Quartz launches Glass, a “notebook”-style vertical focused on the future of TV

Quartz

No, the just-launched Glass isn’t Quartz’s foray into wearables — it’s the new home for the Atlantic Media business site’s “obsession” (Quartz’s term for verticals) with screens:

“The name is an argument: that media are best understood as a competition for attention on screens connected to the internet. Phones, tablets, laptops, monitors, TVs—it’s all just glass.”

Editor Zach Seward writes that the site, glass.qz.com, is powered by Fargo, with an outline format Seward calls a “notebook.” Content is broken into small parts, and many of the main points are expandable.

Glass by Quartz on an iPad Air.

Seward told me via email that lots of topics could be a natural fit for this format, but TV (broadly defined) in particular “is well-suited for an outline because there’s just so much going on related to that topic, generating a lot of half-formed and stray thoughts. The notebook is an ideal home for that kind of stuff and should appeal to people who are similarly obsessed with the future of TV.” Read more

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