Articles about "Reddit"


WHO blacklists BuzzFeed reporter, accidentally tells her

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. WHO blacklists BuzzFeed reporter

    World Health Organization spokesperson Laura Bellinger mistakenly CC'd BuzzFeed reporter Tasneem Nashrulla on an email saying "My understanding is that BuzzFeed is banned." Tarik Jasarevic, another WHO staffer weighed in on another email -- Nashrulla was still CC'd -- saying only BuzzFeed reporter Jina Moore, who is covering Ebola in West Africa, was blacklisted. Jasarevic has not replied to a request from Poynter for elaboration on the thinking behind such an extraordinary (and petty) step. (Mashable) | In August, Jasarevic listed among his duties "being available to report to national and international media about the situation," but he was talking to someone who worked for Bono, not Jonah Peretti. (One)

  2. Former SPJ treasurer sentenced

    Scott Eric Cooper admitted embezzling more than $43,000 from SPJ's Oklahoma chapter and will serve a 10-year deferred sentence.

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Jian Ghomeshi

Toronto Star investigated sex allegations against Jian Ghomeshi

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Jian Ghomeshi leaves CBC under dramatic circumstances: The broadcaster fired the host, whose show “Q” has gained a foothold below the 49th parallel as well, citing “information” it had received about him. (CBC) | “Over the past few months the Star has approached Ghomeshi with allegations from three young women, all about 20 years his junior, who say he was physically violent to them without their consent during sexual encounters or in the lead-up to sexual encounters.” (Toronto Star) | Ghomeshi acknowledges his “tastes in the bedroom may not be palatable to some folks” and says an ex-girlfriend launched a “campaign of harassment, vengeance and demonization against me” and that one person “began colluding with a freelance writer who was known not to be a fan of mine and, together, they set out to try to find corroborators to build a case to defame me.” (Jian Ghomeshi’s Facebook) | Canadaland’s Jesse Brown says he’s been working with the Toronto Star investigating Ghomeshi.
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Reddit’s press guidelines: Get permission from Redditors before using their content in a list

Reddit

New press guidelines from Reddit — which it’s calling “Pressiquette,” a portmanteau I’ll be avoiding for the rest of this post — explain how the site is different from other social networking platforms when it comes to both sourcing content and sharing it.

As Peter Kafka and Mike Isaac pointed out on Twitter, the first guideline seems to be pointed squarely at BuzzFeed, which makes a habit of swiping images and list ideas from Reddit.

Respect the community when sourcing content.

If you see an interesting story or photo on reddit, message the redditor who shared the piece to ask for their permission prior to using it in an article or list, ask how they would like it to be attributed, and provide them a deadline before you move on to another story. Please respect redditors who may wish to stay anonymous, or to not be featured in an article.

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The history of TMZ, FT’s mobile revenue rises

mediawiremorningGood morning. Almost there! Here are 10 or so stories.

  1. The problem with making a graphic about diversity in top newsroom positions over the years: “there isn’t really any racial diversity at all,” Manjula Martin writes. “Any way you click it, of the 183 top editors of mainstream English-language media outlets [Vijith] Assar counted here, one is a black man. Nine are white women (and two of them are Tina Brown).” (Scratch)
  2. Digital subscriptions up 33 percent at FT: Total circulation (677,000 across platforms) is up 13 percent over the first half of last year, FT parent Pearson reports in its half-year results. Mobile “now generates almost 50% of total traffic and 20% of new digital subscriptions,” and mobile ad revenue was up 9 percent. (Pearson) | But sales are down at Pearson, which will have cut 4,000 jobs through 2014. (Bloomberg News) | Related, from March: “How data from Financial Times readers lead to more readers and revenue” (Poynter)
  3. AP’s Gaza-based staff wins the news co-op’s “Beat of the Week” award: In one instance, Senior Managing Editor Mike Oreskes writes in a memo to staffers, photographer Hatem Moussa called colleagues to help and then alerted a Red Cross team after he heard a woman under rubble say, “I’m here under the shop.
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Survey: Readers feel deceived by branded content

Here’s our roundup of the top digital and social media stories you should know about (and from Andrew Beaujon, 10 media stories to start your day, and from Kristen Hare, a world roundup):

At Nieman Lab, Alberto Cairo takes data journalism sites Vox and FiveThirtyEight to task for “worrying cracks that may undermine their own core principles.”

— Two-thirds of respondents to a survey by Contently “said they felt deceived when they realized an article or video was sponsored by a brand,” Erin Griffith writes at Fortune. And most readers don’t even understand what “sponsored content” means.

— Speaking of branded content and native ads, Upworthy claims many of its branded posts outperform editorial posts. Ben Young, CEO of Nudge, tells Digiday’s Ricardo Bilton that it makes sense that native ads “you’ve been working on for two weeks” would perform better than daily content.

— Between January 1 and June 30, Marc Andreessen tweeted 21,783 times, “more than any of Twitter’s founders have posted since its creation, and an average of five tweets per hour, every hour.” Dan Frommer breaks down that craziness at Quartz. Read more

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Editor fired for Reddit shenanigans, BuzzFeed editors don’t shout

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories for the day before your long weekend. And from Sam Kirkland, your daily digital stories.

  1. Editor fired for gaming Reddit: Rod “Slasher” Breslau was fired from CBS Interactive’s esports site OnGamers after he was “caught asking other users to post his stories to Reddit with specific headlines,” Patrick Howell O’Neill reports. Reddit has banned OnGamers as a result, resulting in a loss of half its traffic. (The Daily Dot) || Related: How to get your news site banned from Reddit (Poynter)
  2. These media companies drug-test their employees: The Washington Post, The New York Times and McClatchy all want you to fill a cup. (Gawker)
  3. Voice of America journalists don’t want to be mouthpieces: Their union endorsed a change to the organization’s charter that would require VOA to “actively support American policy,” Ron Nixon reports.
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How to get your news site banned from Reddit

I’ve called Facebook a capricious despot when it comes to how its mystery algorithm dishes out prime News Feed real estate. Figuring out how it favors certain types of content over others can have a major positive impact on your site’s traffic. For better or worse, news organizations are dependent on Facebook for an ever larger share of visitors.

But Reddit might be even more confusing to news organizations. It’s a place where successful posts can expose your content to an international audience of millions and lead to big traffic spikes — but also where human moderators can cut you off for bad behavior or suddenly decide your domain is no longer a good fit for the site’s primary news section.

The Atlantic has experienced both forms of banishment, barred for a time in 2012 due to overzealous link sharing by its then-social media editor. More recently, the media company’s domain has been banned from /r/news, a subreddit that all Reddit users see by default unless they unsubscribe, alongside other major sites like The Huffington Post, Vice and Salon. Read more

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In this April 3, 2013 photo, Mike Caldwell, a 35-year-old software engineer, holds a 25 Bitcoin token at his shop in Sandy, Utah. Caldwell mints physical versions of bitcoins, cranking out homemade tokens with codes protected by tamper-proof holographic seals, a retro-futuristic kind of prepaid cash. With up to 70,000 transactions each day over the past month, bitcoins have been propelled from the world of Internet oddities to the cusp of mainstream use, a remarkable breakthrough for a currency which made its online debut only four years ago. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)

Redditors furious Newsweek ‘doxxed’ Bitcoin founder

For its return to print this week, Newsweek has a splashy story: Senior Writer Leah McGrath Goodman found the mysterious Bitcoin founder Satoshi Nakamoto. She did it with public records:

It was only while scouring a database that contained the registration cards of naturalized U.S. citizens that a Satoshi Nakamoto turned up whose profile and background offered a potential match. But it was not until after ordering his records from the National Archives and conducting many more interviews that a cohesive picture began to take shape.

Two weeks before our meeting in Temple City, I struck up an email correspondence with Satoshi Nakamoto, mostly discussing his interest in upgrading and modifying model steam trains with computer-aided design technologies. I obtained Nakamoto’s email through a company he buys model trains from.

This kind of derring-do plays well with journalists: “How to find Satoshi Nakamoto: The phone book. Wow,” BuzzFeed Editor-in-Chief Ben Smith tweeted. Read more

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Guardian editor’s Reddit AMA: comedy gold

Guardian Editor-in-Chief Alan Rusbridger’s AMA (“Ask Me Anything”) interview on Reddit Wednesday yielded plenty of chewy journo shop talk.

His favorite newspapers outside Britain? The New York Times, The Washington Post, El Pais, Der Spiegel among others. His advice for young journalists? “Blog, tweet, write, photograph, tweet, video, code, play around with data … if you’re any good, you’ll get noticed.” Will the news organization publish more revelations about government surveillance? Yes.

But as the following screen shots show, Rusbridger may be wasted on straight news coverage.

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Pew finds just 6 percent of adults are Reddit users

Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project
A new Pew study has found that 6 percent of online adults use the social networking site Reddit. Among the male Internet users surveyed, 15 percent of those between the ages of 18 and 29 say they use Reddit. By contrast, 5 percent of women the same age use it, and 8 percent of men between the ages of 30 and 49 use it.

Pew reports:

Overall, men are twice as likely as women to be reddit users, those under 50 are significantly more likely to use reddit than those 50 or older, and the site is much more common among urban and suburban residents than among those living in rural areas. Indeed, just 2% of internet users ages 50 and older—and 2% of rural residents—say they use the site.

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