Articles about "Reddit"


Jian Ghomeshi

Toronto Star investigated sex allegations against Jian Ghomeshi

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Jian Ghomeshi leaves CBC under dramatic circumstances: The broadcaster fired the host, whose show “Q” has gained a foothold below the 49th parallel as well, citing “information” it had received about him. (CBC) | “Over the past few months the Star has approached Ghomeshi with allegations from three young women, all about 20 years his junior, who say he was physically violent to them without their consent during sexual encounters or in the lead-up to sexual encounters.” (Toronto Star) | Ghomeshi acknowledges his “tastes in the bedroom may not be palatable to some folks” and says an ex-girlfriend launched a “campaign of harassment, vengeance and demonization against me” and that one person “began colluding with a freelance writer who was known not to be a fan of mine and, together, they set out to try to find corroborators to build a case to defame me.” (Jian Ghomeshi’s Facebook) | Canadaland’s Jesse Brown says he’s been working with the Toronto Star investigating Ghomeshi. “I don’t have any interest in celebrity gossip … this was something serious, something that I felt very strongly needed to be reported. .. This whole thing has a ways to go.” (Canadaland) | Carla Ciccone “was harassed and ridiculed by Ghomeshi fans after she published a thinly disguised account of a sexual encounter with the host on XO Jane last summer.” (Gawker)
  2. Why publishers are scared of Facebook: The company wants to help publishers crack mobile, maybe even host publishers’ pages and split ad revenue, David Carr writes. The big question: “Is the coming contest between platforms and publishing companies an existential threat to journalism?” Atlantic Media owner David Bradley tells Carr. (NYT) | Sam Kirkland wrote earlier this month about how Facebook news partnerships head Liz Heron “answered for a litany of perceived sins and slights” at ONA. (Poynter) | Ravi Somaiya: “Numerous publications, including The New York Times, have met with Facebook officials to discuss how to improve their referral traffic.” (NYT)
  3. Philly papers won’t make endorsement in governor’s race: Owner Gerry Lenfest writes, “Instead of an endorsement for governor, I asked the editorial boards of both The Inquirer and the Daily News to provide a summary of where the candidates stand on the critical issues facing the state, as well as the positions each paper has taken on those issues, and then let the voters decide who they think is most qualified.” (Philly.com) | Joel Mathis: “Through all the battles … of recent years, the Inquirer and its journalists have persistently strived to maintain a reputation as a strong, independent voice in the city. Sunday’s non-endorsement undermines that effort. Sometimes it’s better to take a stand.” (Philadelphia) | Lenfest is among the top donors to Gov. Tom Corbett, who is running for reelection. (AP) | Related: The Boston Globe endorsed — gasp — a Republican in the Massachusetts gubernatorial race. (The Boston Globe) | Dan Kennedy collects the times the newspaper has endorsed Republicans. (Media Nation)
  4. Reddit’s racism problem: “A persistent, organized and particularly hateful strain of racism has emerged on the site,” Jason Abbruzzese writes. “Enabled by Reddit’s system and permitted thanks to its fervent stance against any censorship, it has proven capable of overwhelming the site’s volunteer moderators and rendering entire subreddits unusable.” (Mashable)
  5. Obama doesn’t watch cable news: “I have spent, you know, countless hours with him on Air Force One, especially, in the conference room where we always had the TV on, and it was never in any of the trips I ever took with him, tuned in to cable news,” Jay Carney tells Brian Stelter. (TVNewser)
  6. Chicago mural honors James Foley: A group of his friends “wanted the mural to be near Cafe Jumping Bean, the 18th Street coffee shop where Foley spent time writing and working,” Stephanie Lulay reports. (DNAinfo) | The horrors he and others experienced during their capitivity. (NYT)
  7. News orgs want access to Sayreville hearings: “The media organizations argue that allowing the public access to the case will provide an outlet ‘for community concern’ in the highly charged case. (AP)
  8. Headline of the day: “World Series National Anthem Botched By That Asshole From Staind” (Deadspin)
  9. Front page of the day, curated by Kristen Hare: Canada’s National Post fronts the Ghomeshi mess with a very good headline: “World War Q.” (Courtesy Newseum)

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  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Sam Biddle will be a senior writer at Gawker. Previously, he was co-editor of Valleywag. Nitasha Tiku, the publication’s other top editor, “will be taking over Biddle’s responsibilities.” (Business Insider) | Polina Marinova is now associate editor of audience engagement at Fortune. Previously, she was social media editor at OZY Media. (@polina_marinova) | Karen Leigh is now deputy Middle East bureau chief at The Wall Street Journal. Previously, she was managing editor of Syria Deeply. (@raju) | Rachel Orr will be a mobile designer at The Washington Post. Previously, she was a page designer at Express. (The Washington Post) | Stephen Bohner is now a mobile producer at The Washington Post. Previously, he was an online producer for The Arizona Republic (The Washington Post) | Kyle Brinkman has been named news director for KLFY in Lafayette, Louisiana. Previously, he was news director for WEAR in Pensacola, Florida. Andrea Clenney will be news director for WLTZ in Columbus, Georgia. Previously, she was news director for WCJB in Gainesville, Florida. Jennifer Rigby is vice president of special projects for The Weather Channel. Previously, she was vice president of live programming there. Leesa Dillon is now senior executive producer at WGCL in Atlanta. Previously, she was senior executive producer at KCTV in Kansas City. (Rick Geevers) | The Arkansas Democrat-Gazette is looking for an online news editor. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

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Reddit’s press guidelines: Get permission from Redditors before using their content in a list

Reddit

New press guidelines from Reddit — which it’s calling “Pressiquette,” a portmanteau I’ll be avoiding for the rest of this post — explain how the site is different from other social networking platforms when it comes to both sourcing content and sharing it.

As Peter Kafka and Mike Isaac pointed out on Twitter, the first guideline seems to be pointed squarely at BuzzFeed, which makes a habit of swiping images and list ideas from Reddit.

Respect the community when sourcing content.

If you see an interesting story or photo on reddit, message the redditor who shared the piece to ask for their permission prior to using it in an article or list, ask how they would like it to be attributed, and provide them a deadline before you move on to another story. Please respect redditors who may wish to stay anonymous, or to not be featured in an article.

Plenty of other news sites do this, too, by seizing on a popular front-page Reddit post to do a one-off blog post with “h/t Reddit” at the end. Reddit, which notes that it doesn’t host any images itself, clearly sees that kind of attribution as insufficient.

The guidelines also address how news organizations share content on Reddit:

Stick to the rules

If you’re submitting your own work, keep in mind that reddit’s rules on spam are a bit different than you may be used to. People on reddit feel like a community, and they want to make sure you’re part of that community and not just exploiting it for pageviews. See our self-promotion guidelines for more advice.

In keeping with the community ideal, redditors want to make sure that the items they’re seeing on their various front pages were fairly chosen by the community as a whole. This means that, if you’re submitting something, don’t pass it around to your co-workers to upvote. We consider that vote cheating and it’s the quickest way to get people to think of your posts as fraudulent.

RELATED: How to get your news site banned from Reddit

Violations of this rule can have big consequences. An editor for CBS Interactive’s esports site OnGamers was fired in July for Reddit sharing shenanigans (when OnGamers was banned, it lost half its traffic). The Atlantic and Businessweek domains were banned from the site for a time in 2012 for link spamming.

In April, Reddit’s Victoria Taylor told me the best strategy for taking advantage of the site is to create content “that is interesting to redditors and let the content speak for itself. Let redditors submit the content for you.”


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Related: A journalist’s quick guide to Reddit, the next thing you have to learn (Aug. 2012) Read more

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The history of TMZ, FT’s mobile revenue rises

mediawiremorningGood morning. Almost there! Here are 10 or so stories.

  1. The problem with making a graphic about diversity in top newsroom positions over the years: “there isn’t really any racial diversity at all,” Manjula Martin writes. “Any way you click it, of the 183 top editors of mainstream English-language media outlets [Vijith] Assar counted here, one is a black man. Nine are white women (and two of them are Tina Brown).” (Scratch)
  2. Digital subscriptions up 33 percent at FT: Total circulation (677,000 across platforms) is up 13 percent over the first half of last year, FT parent Pearson reports in its half-year results. Mobile “now generates almost 50% of total traffic and 20% of new digital subscriptions,” and mobile ad revenue was up 9 percent. (Pearson) | But sales are down at Pearson, which will have cut 4,000 jobs through 2014. (Bloomberg News) | Related, from March: “How data from Financial Times readers lead to more readers and revenue” (Poynter)
  3. AP’s Gaza-based staff wins the news co-op’s “Beat of the Week” award: In one instance, Senior Managing Editor Mike Oreskes writes in a memo to staffers, photographer Hatem Moussa called colleagues to help and then alerted a Red Cross team after he heard a woman under rubble say, “I’m here under the shop. God please, I can’t breathe.” Rescuers later pulled her from the rubble as well as her husband and her niece. (AP)
  4. The history of TMZ: Anne Helen Petersen takes a long, fun look at the “well-oiled, money-making, gossip-generating machine” and asks whether it has “compromised the mission that set it apart from the rest of the gossip industry.” (BuzzFeed)
  5. NowThis News changes name to NowThis: The moniker tweak “lets the edit team focus on what’s trending on social channels,” Lucia Moses writes. (Digiday)
  6. Reddit’s live-blogging platform is out of beta: “RedditLive doesn’t have to be a publisher, though that’s technically what it is, but could be a really good source for you in the newsroom,” Karen Fratti writes. (10,000 Words)
  7. BuzzFeed corrects posts with swiped material: Three posts by viral politics editor Benny Johnson contained unattributed text, J.K. Trotter reports. (Gawker) | BuzzFeed EIC Ben Smith says Johnson will remain on staff. (Poynter) | On Wednesday, Johnson accused another publication of stealing his work, saying, “Repeat after me: Copying and pasting someone’s work is called ‘plagiarism’ (@bennyjohnson) | “Citing that tweet, Trotter told POLITICO: ‘I subscribe to Benny Johnson’s theory of plagiarism, under which Benny Johnson is guilty of plagiarism.’” (Politico)
  8. Why Kevin Sablan took a buyout from the OC Register: “I didn’t see our digital efforts move forward. I was happy that we hired dozens of new journalists. I was excited about new weekly community papers. I couldn’t believe how thick our paper had gotten. But I didn’t see any real advancement for our online subscribers.” (Almighty Link)
  9. Here’s today’s world news, edited by Kristen Hare: Al Jazeera correspondent Peter Greste is appealing his seven-year Egyptian jail sentence, Paul Farrell reported in The Guardian. Farrell reports that Greste plans to work with an Egyptian lawyer. | Journalists have been banned from covering fighting in the Donetsk region of eastern Ukraine, according to a report from Reporters Without Borders. “Signed on 21 July by PRD “defence minister” Igor Strelkov and released yesterday, it is fuelling arbitrary arrests of journalists operating in the region.” | The Washington Post’s correspondent in Tehran is in government custody in Iran along with four other journalists, Ernesto Londoño reported Thursday in the Post. Jason Rezaian has worked for the Post since 2012, Londoño reported. | From The Province, published in Vancouver, Canada, a perfect Friday headline. (Front page courtesy Newseum.)

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  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Joshua Topolsky, the co-founder and top editor of The Verge, will join Bloomberg as “the editor of a series of new online ventures,” Ravi Somaiya reported in The New York Times. He will be replaced by co-founder Nilay Patel, currently the managing editor of Vox.com. (Poynter) | Derl McCrudden has been named head of international video for the Associated Press. Formerly he was head of video newsgathering. Denise Vance, AP’s deputy director of U.S. video, has been named head of U.S. video and radio. Vaughn Morrison, former vice president for programming and production for TV Guide on Demand, has been named AP’s head of U.S. video production. (AP) | Jake Milstein has been promoted to news director of KIRO in Seattle. Previously, he was KIRO’s managing editor. (coxmediagroup.com) | Simone Eli is a sports reporter and anchor at Houston’s KPRC. Previously, she was a sportscaster at WALA in Mobile, Alabama. (@Simone_Eli) | Alexandra Peers has been named culture editor at the New York Observer. Peers is “a veteran arts writer” and has been a reporter with The Wall Street Journal, Joe Pompeo writes. (Capital New York) | Indrani Sen, formerly an interim editor at Quartz, will be deputy news editor there. She’ll be joined at Quartz by Heather Landy, who will be Quartz’ global news editor. Formerly, Landy was editor in chief at American Banker. (Mediabistro) | Job of the day: The Lamar Ledger in Southeast Colorado is looking for a news editor. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs)| Send Ben your job moves:bmullin@poynter.org.

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Survey: Readers feel deceived by branded content

Here’s our roundup of the top digital and social media stories you should know about (and from Andrew Beaujon, 10 media stories to start your day, and from Kristen Hare, a world roundup):

At Nieman Lab, Alberto Cairo takes data journalism sites Vox and FiveThirtyEight to task for “worrying cracks that may undermine their own core principles.”

— Two-thirds of respondents to a survey by Contently “said they felt deceived when they realized an article or video was sponsored by a brand,” Erin Griffith writes at Fortune. And most readers don’t even understand what “sponsored content” means.

— Speaking of branded content and native ads, Upworthy claims many of its branded posts outperform editorial posts. Ben Young, CEO of Nudge, tells Digiday’s Ricardo Bilton that it makes sense that native ads “you’ve been working on for two weeks” would perform better than daily content.

— Between January 1 and June 30, Marc Andreessen tweeted 21,783 times, “more than any of Twitter’s founders have posted since its creation, and an average of five tweets per hour, every hour.” Dan Frommer breaks down that craziness at Quartz.

Glenn Greenwald’s not happy about how moderators of Reddit’s world news section are filtering out stories from The Intercept because they consider it “opinion” content. “Reddit is practicing censorship, pure and simple,” he said in an AMA.


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Editor fired for Reddit shenanigans, BuzzFeed editors don’t shout

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories for the day before your long weekend. And from Sam Kirkland, your daily digital stories.

  1. Editor fired for gaming Reddit: Rod “Slasher” Breslau was fired from CBS Interactive’s esports site OnGamers after he was “caught asking other users to post his stories to Reddit with specific headlines,” Patrick Howell O’Neill reports. Reddit has banned OnGamers as a result, resulting in a loss of half its traffic. (The Daily Dot) || Related: How to get your news site banned from Reddit (Poynter)
  2. These media companies drug-test their employees: The Washington Post, The New York Times and McClatchy all want you to fill a cup. (Gawker)
  3. Voice of America journalists don’t want to be mouthpieces: Their union endorsed a change to the organization’s charter that would require VOA to “actively support American policy,” Ron Nixon reports. (NYT)
  4. NYPD’s public records policy gets law wrong: It says it has 10 days to reply. The law says 5. (Capital) || FREEKY FLASHBAKK: NYPD stops giving journalists crime reports at precincts (Poynter)
  5. USPS cuts could affect weekly newspapers: National Newspaper Association President Robert M. Williams Jr. wrote Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe to protest USPS’ plan to close 82 mail-processing plants. “NNA firmly believes that mail service to rural and small-town America is critical to local economies. We will not stand by quietly when it is put at risk.” (The Rural Blog)
  6. Murdoch money flows to Clintons: “Rupert Murdoch’s 21st Century Fox/News Corp has given more than $3 million to Bill and Hillary Clinton over the past 22 years.” (Politico)
  7. The New York Times has already closed a lot of blogs: It has “ended or merged about half of the 60 or so blogs that it had at the high point two years ago, and there may be about another 10 to go,” Margaret Sullivan writes. But “nothing is on the chopping block at this moment.” (NYT) || The Times prizes collaboration, and good blogs emerge from “from isolation and lonely enterprise,” the blogger Erik Wemple writes. (The Washington Post)
  8. BuzzFeed editors don’t shout: “It’s such an old-fashioned idea the idea that a newspaper editor has to be someone who marches up and down shouting,” BuzzFeed UK Editor Luke Lewis tells William Turvill. “I think that model has not got much longer left for this world.” He also says the publication has a culture “of experimentation,” “which means saying yes to pretty much every idea.” (PressGazette) || “The BuzzFeed formula — not just personalizing pop trivia, but treating it as an inexorable element of our emotional makeup — feels like the natural outcome of several decades of plug-in room deodorizers and Toyotathons and hamburger-slinging clowns.” (NYT)
  9. Layoffs: The Wall Street Journal has laid off 20-40 people (NYT) || 22 people lost their jobs Wednesday when the Star Media Group announced it was closing The Grid, a Toronto magazine. (Toronto Star) || “Well, we gave it our best shot.” (@TheGridTO)
  10. Job stuff, edited by Ben Mullin: Jonathan Hart, a founder of the Online News Association, has left his job as general counsel there to become the chief legal officer and general counsel for NPR. (ONA) His spot will be filled by Michael Kovaka. (Jim Brady) Shelley Acoca, who had been an editor of Fox News Magazine, will become the East Coast lifestyles and entertainment editor for the Associated Press. (AP)

Correction: This post originally misspelled Shelley Acoca’s first name.

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How to get your news site banned from Reddit

I’ve called Facebook a capricious despot when it comes to how its mystery algorithm dishes out prime News Feed real estate. Figuring out how it favors certain types of content over others can have a major positive impact on your site’s traffic. For better or worse, news organizations are dependent on Facebook for an ever larger share of visitors.

But Reddit might be even more confusing to news organizations. It’s a place where successful posts can expose your content to an international audience of millions and lead to big traffic spikes — but also where human moderators can cut you off for bad behavior or suddenly decide your domain is no longer a good fit for the site’s primary news section.

The Atlantic has experienced both forms of banishment, barred for a time in 2012 due to overzealous link sharing by its then-social media editor. More recently, the media company’s domain has been banned from /r/news, a subreddit that all Reddit users see by default unless they unsubscribe, alongside other major sites like The Huffington Post, Vice and Salon. Content from the sites dropped off severely late last summer. Read more

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In this April 3, 2013 photo, Mike Caldwell, a 35-year-old software engineer, holds a 25 Bitcoin token at his shop in Sandy, Utah. Caldwell mints physical versions of bitcoins, cranking out homemade tokens with codes protected by tamper-proof holographic seals, a retro-futuristic kind of prepaid cash. With up to 70,000 transactions each day over the past month, bitcoins have been propelled from the world of Internet oddities to the cusp of mainstream use, a remarkable breakthrough for a currency which made its online debut only four years ago. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)

Redditors furious Newsweek ‘doxxed’ Bitcoin founder

For its return to print this week, Newsweek has a splashy story: Senior Writer Leah McGrath Goodman found the mysterious Bitcoin founder Satoshi Nakamoto. She did it with public records:

It was only while scouring a database that contained the registration cards of naturalized U.S. citizens that a Satoshi Nakamoto turned up whose profile and background offered a potential match. But it was not until after ordering his records from the National Archives and conducting many more interviews that a cohesive picture began to take shape.

Two weeks before our meeting in Temple City, I struck up an email correspondence with Satoshi Nakamoto, mostly discussing his interest in upgrading and modifying model steam trains with computer-aided design technologies. I obtained Nakamoto’s email through a company he buys model trains from.

This kind of derring-do plays well with journalists: “How to find Satoshi Nakamoto: The phone book. Wow,” BuzzFeed Editor-in-Chief Ben Smith tweeted. But on Reddit, “doxxing” (releasing personal information about someone) is a cardinal sin. And Goodman’s revelations about Nakamoto — including his picture and one of his house — are not terribly popular on r/bitcoin.

“[D]oxxing people is apparently fine if you are a ‘journalist,’” one commenter wrote. “Well, yeah, sorry Reddit’s rules don’t apply to the real world in that regard, they never really have,” another replied.

“Can anyone here locate the address of one Leah McGrath Goodman – perhaps we should post her address, license plate and picture of her home, so people can come and comment on the article?” wrote another. “if you can please post it here; She probably can’t wait for people to knock on her door.. I mean obviously – she doesn’t care about privacy.”

(On Twitter, Leah McGrath Goodman noted that addresses and car registrations are already public.) “Reddit users are welcome to share their own opinions on the whereabouts and identity of Mr. Nakamoto but we would encourage them to abstain from ad hominem attacks on our reporter, Leah McGrath Goodman,” a Newsweek spokesperson told Capital. Read more

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Guardian editor’s Reddit AMA: comedy gold

Guardian Editor-in-Chief Alan Rusbridger’s AMA (“Ask Me Anything”) interview on Reddit Wednesday yielded plenty of chewy journo shop talk.

His favorite newspapers outside Britain? The New York Times, The Washington Post, El Pais, Der Spiegel among others. His advice for young journalists? “Blog, tweet, write, photograph, tweet, video, code, play around with data … if you’re any good, you’ll get noticed.” Will the news organization publish more revelations about government surveillance? Yes.

But as the following screen shots show, Rusbridger may be wasted on straight news coverage.

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Pew finds just 6 percent of adults are Reddit users

Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project
A new Pew study has found that 6 percent of online adults use the social networking site Reddit. Among the male Internet users surveyed, 15 percent of those between the ages of 18 and 29 say they use Reddit. By contrast, 5 percent of women the same age use it, and 8 percent of men between the ages of 30 and 49 use it.

Pew reports:

Overall, men are twice as likely as women to be reddit users, those under 50 are significantly more likely to use reddit than those 50 or older, and the site is much more common among urban and suburban residents than among those living in rural areas. Indeed, just 2% of internet users ages 50 and older—and 2% of rural residents—say they use the site.

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Newsrooms say referrals from Reddit are increasing

Throughout 2013, Reddit has been referring more and more users to news sites, according to several online editors.

Gary Nielson, digital news specialist at McClatchy Interactive, noticed this recently. First, an online producer in Charlotte spotted huge traffic for a particular story that had been posted on Reddit. Then, a monthly report came out, Nielson said in a phone interview. Reddit had moved up to No. 10 as a referral site. Previously it sat down at No. 22.

Tom Moore, online editor at the Santa Cruz Sentinel, noted the same trend. Throughout 2013, he told me in an email, referrals from Reddit have doubled, over the previous year. It now ranks around No. 15, which is still a small number of referrals, compared to Google or Facebook. But he’s paying attention. Last year, intern Eric Brown published a  short guide to Reddit on the paper’s blog.

Dan Petty, social media editor at the Denver Post, said in an email that referrals from Reddit have increased more than 300 percent in the first five months of 2013 over the same period the previous year, coming in at No. 11, up from No. 21.

For the uninitiated, Reddit is a text-heavy social site with 69.9 million monthly users, who vote posts up and down. By comparison Facebook has 1.11 billion. Instagram has 100 million. Online communities form around various themed subreddits, which consist of links posted by users, who then interact with each other through comment threads. Although it’s nicknamed the “front page of the internet,” Reddit is sometimes seen as confusing, overwhelming, or just cluttered to those who don’t use it.

President Barack Obama did an AMA (ask me anything) during the 2012 election, which generated 3.3 million subscribers. And Reddit got lots of attention during the week after the Boston Marathon bombing, when some of its users formed a subreddit designed to help police identify the attackers, but instead turned into a digital witch hunt, singling out as suspects several innocent people by name or photograph. That thread has since been made private to the creators.

Redditors were also behind the massive donation campaign to send a bus monitor on vacation and after she had been humiliated and berated on a video posted to the internet by a middle school boy. They ultimately raised enough money for her to retire.

For all the attention Reddit has received, newsrooms that use it well are treading lightly. Even after Reddit became a central source of news aggregation during the Aurora, Colo. theater shootings, Petty said the Post still doesn’t have a formal Reddit strategy. Such a strategy may not be necessary.

“When we do find an article, or story or photo gallery or video that we feel might resonate particularly well with the Reddit community, we will post it in the relevant subreddit (usually /r/denver),” he wrote in an email. “We have a few people in the newsroom who are especially big Redditors — who will post stories there consistently, and not always our work. That’s where the real work comes in — cultivating that reputation with good posts that always aren’t your own. Not unlike Twitter, but even more niche than that.”

Most of the increase in the Denver Post’s Reddit referrals come from a handful well-placed links to Post, Petty said.

Two news sites have caught the attention of Reddit’s general manager Erik Martin for their activity. Slate reporters do lots of IAmAs (I am a …),  which each generate a couple hundred comments. However, the online network TWiT “is the only one that has really done something meaningful in the subreddit space,” Martin said.

TWiT created a subreddit called Tech News Today with 16,000 subscribers. The key to its success is that it posts links and starts discussions about a variety of issues, not just its own content, Martin wrote.

Given Reddit’s potential to drive a lot of traffic to news sites, here are some best practices gleaned from the people quoted in this story.

  • First, get to know Reddit, which has a distinct code of behavior (like it’s not cool at all to reveal in any way another user’s real identity.)
  • Find out who in your newsroom is using Reddit and how they use it. There is a subreddit on almost everything.  Participate in subreddits on different geographic areas, events and activities relevant to your audience.
  • Although Reddit is generally anonymous, journalists should be transparent about who they are and what their intentions are if they are looking for sources or gathering information for stories.
  • Redditors get offended when they feel used. Participants have to be genuine members of a community to be taken seriously.
  • To learn about Reddit, staff members can post an AMA (ask me anything) to the IAmA thread. But first you have to understand the difference in the terminology. AMAs are a format. IAmA is a particular subreddit where many AMAs appear. But it’s not the only place.
  • Learn what resonates and why. The Seattle subreddit is different than the St. Petersburg subreddit. That’s because Reddit isn’t one community, but millions of communities. They each have their own flavor.

Reddit provides newsrooms with an opportunity to engage young, smart audiences, said Moore, the online editor in Santa Cruz. Success with Reddit will come from having a critical mass of staff members who enjoy participating on the site.

“We all agreed to get to know more about Reddit, kick the tires,” said Nielson, the McClatchy Interactive guy.  “We’ll get in there and play more.”

And if you don’t have folks on staff who enjoy the whole Reddit vibe, the other thing you can do is hire more Redditors.

Previously: A journalist’s quick guide to Reddit, the next thing you have to learn | Boston Globe reporter on Reddit: ‘It’s amazing how many trends and stories start there’ Read more

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