Articles about "Reuters"


Mashable headquarters. (Image courtesy Mashable)

Mashable, too, heads to Europe

Mashable headquarters. (Image courtesy Mashable)

Mashable headquarters. (Image courtesy Mashable)

Ask Mashable Executive Editor Jim Roberts about his plans for the future and he says — with tongue planted firmly in cheek — that he’s looking to achieve “global domination.”

That may seem ambitious for the top editor of a news organization that until this year had not expanded outside the U.S, but Roberts is serious when it comes to growing the site’s international audience.

On Tuesday, the company announced it would open a London office in October, naming former WorldIrish.com editorial director Blathnaid Healy its U.K. editor.

“I think we’ve only scratched the surface of what we can hope to see in terms of building a global audience,” Roberts said in a phone interview. “The subjects that we focus on really do have global appeal, whether it’s climate coverage or technology news or the latest in digital culture, viral content, memes — these are things that don’t necessarily adhere to geographic and physical boundaries.”

Roberts’ claims aren’t just talk. Over the past 18 months, Mashable — helped along by a $14 million infusion of capital — has doubled in size, adding 70 employees to its staff of 70. In June, the company announced its first international expansion, appointing former news.com.au multimedia editor Jenni Ryall Australian editor. In March, the company opened a Los Angeles office to better cover the entertainment industry. Earlier this month, Mashable moved to larger offices in New York City’s Flatiron district to accommodate its growing staff.

Mashable chose London because it’s a prime market for advertising, with a ready-made audience, said Seth Rogin, the company’s chief revenue officer.

“Mashable views the world from the lens of the Web and London is a supremely savvy and cultured place,” Rogin said in a phone interview. “It makes sense for us to be there.”

Staffers at the London office will have a threefold mandate, Roberts said. They will be charged with creating content relevant to the UK as well as Mashable’s general audience. They will report on regional stories of international import, such as the recent Scottish independence referendum. And they will also be a part of the company’s global editing team, charged with pushing out news 24/7.

Ultimately, the plan is to create a bureau that provides news, features, entertainment to a growing audience without losing sight of Mashable’s trademark tech coverage, Roberts said.

The online news organization’s dramatic growth roughly coincided with a couple of hires from legacy companies. Roberts, formerly executive editor of Reuters digital, was brought aboard in October. Rogin, formerly vice president of advertising at The New York Times, was hired in June 2013.

When he arrived at Mashable, Roberts says he brought with him a desire to cover stories of international import, including the turmoil in Ukraine, the rise of the Islamic State group and the turbulance in Gaza.

“One of my goals was to try to put us on a sound footing for stories people were paying attention to,” Roberts said.

He isn’t alone in this regard. With its expansions abroad, Mashable joins a growing list of other Web-focused news organizations with international ambitions:

  • In August, BuzzFeed announced it was expanding to Berlin, Mexico City, Mumbai and Tokyo.
  • Earlier this month, Politico announced a joint venture in Europe with Berlin-based media company Axel Springer.
  • Vice Media, fresh from a $500 million investment round from A+E Networks and Technology Crossover Ventures, is also increasing its footprint abroad with an expansion into India.
  • Business Insider is planning to launch Business Insider Europe, which will serve up “social-friendly content with a localized twist,” Ricardo Bilton writes for DigiDay.

But Roberts says he’s prepared to vie for international audiences despite the crowded field — not just with transplants from the U.S., but with any organization that draws eyeballs away from Mashable, including TV and radio.

“I think that I tend to view everybody as our competition,” Roberts said. “Anything that competes for somebody’s attention is our competition.” Read more

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Career Beat: Naomi Zeichner named editor-in-chief of The Fader

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community.

  • Missy Ryan will be a Pentagon correspondent for The Washington Post. Previously, she was a reporter at Reuters. (The Washington Post)
  • Yumiko Ono is now Asia audience engagement editor at The Wall Street Journal. Previously, she was managing editor of Wall Street Journal Japan. (@raju)
  • Trip Gabriel is now a political correspondent for The New York Times. He was a national correspondent there. Jennifer Steinhauer is now mid-atlantic bureau chief for The New York Times. Previously, she was a congressional reporter there. (Politico)
  • Amy Keller Laird is now editor-in-chief of Women’s Health. Previously, she was executive editor there. (Women’s Wear Daily)
  • Naomi Zeichner is now editor-in-chief of The Fader. Previously, she was music editor at BuzzFeed. (@nomizeichner)
  • Megan Sowder-Staley is now vice president for product strategy at Roll Call. Previously, she was director of product strategy there. Todd Ruger is a legal affairs staff writer for Roll Call. Previously, he covered legal issues for the National Law Journal. Rachel Oswald is a defense reporter for Roll Call. Previously, she was a reporter for Global Security Newswire. Connor O’Brien is a defense policy reporter for Roll Call. Previously, he was a congressional news reporter there. Gillian Roberts is now breaking news editor at Roll Call. Previously, she was a White House stringer at Bloomberg. Jamisha Ford is now special products editor at CQ Now. Previously, she was deputy editor at CQ Now. Bridget Bowman will cover the Capitol for Roll Call’s Hill Blotter blog. She was an intern there. Chris Williams is a multimedia and online developer for Roll Call. Previously, he was web director for Personal Selling Power. (Roll Call)

Job of the Day: Eagle-Tribune Publishing is looking for page designers. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs)

Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org Read more

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Career Beat: BuzzFeed names product lead for news app

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • Noah Chestnut will be the lead developer for BuzzFeed’s news app. He’s currently director of labs at The New Republic. (Capital)
  • Rob Mennie is now senior vice president of Gannett Broadcasting and general manager for WTLV/WJXX in Jacksonville, Florida. Previously, he was senior vice president of news for Gannett Broadcasting. (Gannett)
  • Ben Walsh will be a business reporter at The Huffington Post. He’s currently a writer for Reuters. (‏@BenDWalsh)
  • Kimberly Leonard will be a healthcare reporter for U.S. News and World Report. Previously, she was a health producer there. (@leonardkl)
  • Larry Abramson is now dean of the journalism school at the University of Montana. Previously, he was a correspondent for National Public Radio. Eric Whitney is now director of news for Montana Public Radio. Previously, he was a health reporter for National Public Radio. (The Missoulian)

Job of the day: KFSN in Fresno, California is looking for a news photojournalist and live truck operator. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs)

Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org Read more

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Vladimir Putin

Russian ‘law on bloggers’ takes effect today

mediawiremorningHello there. Sorry this isn’t Beaujon. Here are 10 or so media stories. Happy Friday!

  1. Russian blogger law goes into effect: It could crack down on free expression, Alec Luhn explains: “Popularly known as the ‘law on bloggers,’ the legislation requires users of any website whose posts are read by more than 3,000 people each day to publish under their real name and register with the authorities if requested.” (The Guardian) | “Registered bloggers have to disclose their true identity, avoid hate speech, ‘extremist calls’ and even obscene language.” (Gigaom) | The law also states that “social networks must maintain six months of data on its users.” (BBC News)
  2. More on David Frum non-faked photo fakery saga: Photo fakery surely occurs in places like Gaza, James Fallows writes. “But the claim that it has is as serious as they come in journalism.” The three words that are the “immensely powerful source of pride in what we do,” he says: “I saw that.” (The Atlantic) | Frum-related: 3 ways to prevent your apology from becoming the story, from Kristen Hare. (Poynter) | Gaza-related: Jay Rosen on why the AP revised its “members of Congress fall over each other to support Israel” tweet: “A major provider like the AP gets hit hard in the bias wars, so the principle, don’t give them ammunition! has to be built into its routines.” (Pressthink)
  3. SEC watchdog conducted lengthy leak investigation: “The SEC’s Office of Inspector General (OIG) started the investigation after Reuters published information about the regulator’s decision, taken in a closed-door meeting on Sept. 12, 2013, to settle its probe into JPMorgan Chase & Co’s massive London Whale trading loss.” Inspectors “don’t consider issues of press freedom when carrying out their investigations,” according to an OIG official. (Reuters)
  4. Media company Twitter interactions are up: The average number of Twitter interactions per month increased 159 percent between June 2013 and June 2014. John McDermott attributes that to October design tweaks that allow users to interact with retweet, reply and favorite buttons without first clicking or tapping the tweet. (Digiday)
  5. Chicago Tribune launches new website: The responsive platform — explained here by editor Gerould Kern — will be rolled out to other Tribune newspaper sites later this year, when metered paywalls will also be introduced. (Chicago Tribune) | Previously: Suggested tweets and choose-your-own adventure scrolling will be familiar to those who have visited the relaunched LA Times. (Poynter)
  6. More issues with Carol Vogel’s NYT stories? A tipster clues Erik Wemple in to three other troubling cases. But he notes “Not all eerie similarities are created equal.” (Washington Post) | A Times editor note earlier in the week acknowledges Vogel lifted part of a July 25 column from Wikipedia. (Poynter)
  7. Telegraph’s traffic up 20 percent in June: How? A “surge in Facebook traffic referral” as the Telegraph emphasized Facebook over Twitter. “It had previously been all about Twitter. Journalists are all on Twitter, and obsessed with it, so that is where the energy had gone,” Telegraph Media Group editor-in-chief Jason Seiken tells Mark Sweney. (The Guardian) | Related oldie-but-goodie: Ezra Klein tackles the “Why are journalists so obsessed with Twitter?” question. (Washington Post)
  8. Washington Business Journal won’t use the term ‘Redskins’: “I can’t dodge the question anymore,” editor-in-chief Douglas Fruehling writes in a paywalled article. (Washington Business Journal) | We’ll add them to our list of publications rejecting the football team name. (Poynter)
  9. It’s all about the clicks: “Has the Internet killed newspapers?” asks Jon Stewart. “YES!” The takeaway from this segment: Spend 15 minutes on a headline, five minutes on the article itself. (The Daily Show)
     

     

  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Sara Just will be the executive producer of PBS NewsHour. Formerly, she was Washington deputy bureau chief for ABC News. (PBS NewsHour) | Josh Rubin will be executive producer and managing director for video at the Daily Dot. Formerly, he was a producer at CNN. Allen Weiner will be an editor at large at the Daily Dot. Formerly, he was a vice president of research for Gartner, Inc. (The Daily Dot) | Brandi Grissom will be enterprise editor for the Los Angeles Times. Formerly, she was managing editor of The Texas Tribune. (@brandigrissom) | Shelby Grad will be assistant managing editor for California news at the Los Angeles Times. Formerly, he was city editor there. Ashley Dunn will be deputy national editor for the Los Angeles Times. Formerly, he was metro editor there. Mark Porubcansky, foreign editor for the Los Angeles Times, will be retiring. Kim Murphy, who has been named assistant managing editor for national and foreign news, will add international coverage to her responsibilities. (Los Angeles Times) | Oskar Garcia, news editor for the Associated Press in charge of coverage of Hawaii, will be AP’s east region sports editor. (Associated Press) | LaToya Valmont will be managing editor of Glamour. Formerly, she was production director there. Job of the day: The Newhouse School at Syracuse University is looking for a director of its Goldring Arts Journalism program. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org.

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would you like this roundup each morning? Please email abeaujon@poynter.org. Read more

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NYT says its Gaza photos are real

BagNews

The New York Times says Atlantic senior editor David Frum is incorrect to claim that some photos taken in Gaza last week were faked or staged. “David Frum’s claims are false,” Times spokesperson Eileen Murphy told Poynter. Frum sent several tweets last week claiming the photos were faked.

“We have a complete account from the photographer, Sergey Ponomarev, who arrived with two other photographers to a local hospital as ambulances began arriving with dead and wounded civilians following an Israeli military strike on the outskirts of Khan Younis,” Murphy writes in an email.

Ponomarev “witnessed the man covered in blood in this photo arrive in an ambulance with a badly wounded elderly man (who ultimately died),” Murphy writes. “He sent us 84 pictures in total that give a complete understanding of the events as they unfolded.”

The photography news site BagNews examined photos from The New York Times, Reuters and the Associated Press following Frum’s accusations. Frum started by linking to a post from Thomas Wictor, who made the case that photos of the scene from Reuters were staged.

Here’s how BagNews summed up the flap:

Comparing the Reuters portrait above (#2) with an AP photo from the hospital someone randomly sent to him (#6 below), Wictor noticed that the brothers in the portrait no longer had blood on their hands and face and concluded that there must be some Palestinian, as well as media trickery going on. Rather than submitting Wictor’s accusation of subterfuge to further review however, Frum not only took the accusations on faith but added the NY Times to the supposed conspiracy because the Times featured a similar portrait (#1) by one of its own photographers taken almost simultaneously to the Reuters photo (#2).

BagNews’ post offers a possible timeline of the photos and asks — is it possible the two men eventually washed the blood off their faces and hands?

In any case, I contacted Reuters for a statement and they wrote back:

“We’ve confirmed with our photographer that the man in the photo washed his hands and face after his father’s body was admitted to the hospital.”

In March of this year, Poynter’s Andrew Beaujon wrote about Reuters using activists as photographers in Syria. The company then told Poynter that there were no instances of staged photos “in Syria or elsewhere.” Read more

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AP F IL USA EARNS TRIBUNE

Eighteen months after dropping AP, Tribune happy with Reuters

When newspaper ad revenues were in free fall in 2008, there was much angry complaining among editors about the high cost and inflexibility of the Associated Press service. At a gripe session in Washington, one editor compared the cooperative to the USSR’s politburo.  Threats to quit were common.

In the end though, AP cut its rates, offered several levels of service and has retained the great majority of its newspaper members (who also own the cooperative and hold most its board seats).

But there was an exception.

Starting in 2009, Chicago Tribune editor Gerould Kern quietly began working with Reuters to build an acceptable substitute service.  Kern told me the Chicago Tribune ran its last AP material in March 2012.  With six other Tribune papers (but not the Los Angeles Times), it dropped AP entirely at the start of 2013.

Kern said in a phone interview that he cannot recall a single reader complaint about inferior wire coverage.  At “a price that has saved us significant amount of money,” Kern said, the Tribune and others are getting “more than adequate” content from Reuters and can devote more resources to local investigations, arts and sports.

“We are not anti-AP,” Kern told me several times, “but we believe in competition and choice in the market place.  That makes everyone better.”

Reuters is pushing hard to recruit other converts but so far with only moderate success.  “We’ve been around for 160 years,” Steven Schwartz, global managing director of the Reuters news agency, said in an interview, “but we needed to create a (national) service from the ground up.  We have been encouraged by the uptake to date, but it’s a long road.”

For Reuters, the sales pitch is all about price, “a fraction of the cost (of AP),” Schwartz said.  Neither he nor Kern would be more specific, but I would guess that Reuters charges half or less of AP’s rates, themselves reduced by 30 to 40 percent since 2008.

Schwartz had no criticisms of AP’s quality, but when I suggested that some papers may be sticking with AP because of loyalty and the ownership connection, he flashed a competitive side:

Ours is an industry steeped in tradition and that’s both good and bad.  Gerry’s leadership (in making the switch ) has been unusual….I would say if a paper is continuing out of a sense of commitment to AP, that’s probably a breach of fiduciary duty.

AP too has some fighting words apropos the competition.  In a speech at the newspaper Association of America convention in Denver in March, CEO Gary Pruitt said of newspapers considering dropping membership:

If you walk away from AP, you walk away from your ownership stake in the most important news organization in the world. Good luck with that.

(The Associated Press is a non-profit cooperative owned by its newspaper members. “Profits” are held and reinvested in the company. Newspaper members get special input on news or business matters only in the sense that newspaper executives have a large majority of seats on the board. However, broadcast and international are now bigger business segments for AP.)

Pruitt promised improvements in state coverage, more video  and further pricing options.  But with industry advertising revenues sinking again this year, I don’t see much likelihood that the issue of settling for a “good enough” wire alternative will go away.

Kern and Schwartz concede that even getting to good enough took some doing.  Reuters is part of Thomson Reuters, an internationally oriented company whose main business is specialized financial information.

So for a start Reuters needed to hire correspondents in cities like Denver and Dallas to provide its own coverage of the biggest breaking national news in the U.S.

“We didn’t want a fire hose,” Kern said.  “We have a news service of our own (McClatchy/Tribune) that is the largest supplemental wire.  With that and some other contributors, we already had a rich vein of national content.”

“Sports was a crucial issue to resolve,” Kern continued.  Reuters needed to build out with affiliations to many single-subject digital sites and piece together sports agate.  That was the last content category to be finished before Tribune was ready to go without AP.

AP also prides itself on deep election night coverage and an ability to call races accurately.  Reuters began testing a new system in the March 2012 presidential primaries with IPSOS market research doing the polling and forecasting.  It has performed well, Kern said, and will be expanded by this November’s general election.

On the other hand, Reuters has made no attempt to build state-by-state bureaus with legislative coverage like AP’s.  Kern said that content-sharing arrangements among previously competing papers and other sources serve that need adequately.

Pruitt hinted at a counter-offensive in his March speech to NAA, and that is now rolling out.  AP has assigned a senior executive to oversee the state reports and hired additional journalists.  The service also has started producing national packages on issues like flood insurance and ethanol that can easily be localized by a member paper with a little additional reporting.

Kate Butler, vice president/ membership and local markets, told me that a new mid-tier level of service will be offered soon and begin operation in January 2015. At the same time, she said, the AP will expand its cafeteria-style add-on content packages on topics like the arts and sports from 5 to 10.

Its current limited basic member service costs roughly 50 percent of what a paper would pay for the full basic package, Butler said.  The new mid-tier will be about 75 percent with extra slices of content 5 to 10 percent.

Traditionally Associated Press required member papers to provide two years’ notice to cancel. That’s now been reduced to one year for those who pay a small premium.  That window allows AP to adjust rates and address individual complaints, though for fairness’s sake it offers comparable pricing for papers of similar size.

Butler said that at least two other chains looked at the Reuters alternative but have decided to stick with AP.

Even after the rate adjustments, full AP service costs a typical metro over $1 million a year and a bigger metro like the Chicago Tribune considerably more than that.  Even a mid-sized paper can rack up a bill well into six figures.

Reuters offers typically include extended free trials and a willingness to tailor the package individually to what a paper feels it needs but cannot produce itself.

In a dozen of my own searches of Tribune’s content, I found few if any obvious gaps in wire coverage of major stories.  For certain story types — breaking news obituaries, for example — the Reuters’ versions were not as complete or well-crafted as AP’s.  But I doubt the typical reader would notice a difference.

Tribune and other defectors would also lack access to AP enterprise stories, its deep foreign reach and top-of-the-line photography and video.  But from the readers’ perspective, they may literally not know what they are missing.

Some of AP’s past programs at the newspaper publishers convention included live hook-ups to world trouble spots and in one instance, a presentation  by a photographer/reporter who had talked her way into a Middle Eastern opium den and came out with riveting video. This year, the content portion of Pruitt’s talk, emphasized First Amendment initiatives and a practical effort to get better access for White House photographers.

Over the next several years, I think AP clients and the service itself, will be asking just how much excellence they can afford.  The good old days of monopoly-pricing power are gone.

Even with a focus on keeping expenses lower, AP’s Butler said, “I know (the service) is a substantial cost, but we think it also delivers a substantial value.”  As for Reuters, she added, “It is good to have competition and choice. We wish them well but not too well.”

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Why are so many news organizations still worried about retweets by staffers?

Here’s our roundup of the top digital and social media stories you should know about (and from Andrew Beaujon, 10 media stories to start your day, and from Kristen Hare, a world roundup):

— At Reuters, Jack Shafer picks up on my piece yesterday about how so many news organizations — with The New York Times being a notable exception — still seem afraid of reporters’ retweets coming across as endorsements: “Are NPR, the AP, and Reuters’s editorial reputations really so fragile that a 140-character tweet or retweet by a staffer can blow the whole thing down?”

— Three months into the “temporary” Chicago Sun-Times comments ban, publisher and editor-in-chief Jim Kirk tells Robert Feder “he’s heard no complaints lately and he’s seen no drop-off in online traffic.” Comments should return with a new CMS “sometime around the fourth quarter.”

— BuzzFeed’s director of editorial products, Alice DuBois, on the photo “slide things” in popular posts lately: “I do think there’s a part of the editorial mission to keep pushing and experimenting,” she tells Poynter’s Andrew Beaujon.

— The Dallas Morning News has abandoned its “premium” website, which was ad-free and aimed to be more nicely designed. “But you could see this result coming a Texas mile away,” writes Joshua Benton at Nieman Lab. “The premium site was not some beautiful, immersive experience — it was aggressively ugly and a pain to navigate.”

— “It used to be that there was an ever-more alarming growth in the hours people spent in front of the TV,” Michael Wolff writes at USA Today. “Now the greater concern is the limits of human attention.”


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Britain NSA Surveillance

Obama administration knew in advance about destruction of Guardian’s hard drives

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories. Want more roundups? We got ‘em! From Sam Kirkland: “Why are so many news organizations still worried about retweets by staffers?” From Kristen Hare: “Chinese journalists get a warning; press freedoms halt in South Sudan.”

  1. Obama administration knew British government planned to force Guardian to destroy hard drives with Snowden docs: AP scores emails with a FOIA request. “‘Good news, at least on this front,’ the current NSA deputy director, Richard Ledgett, said at the end of a short, censored email to then-NSA director Gen. Keith Alexander and others. The subject of that July 19, 2013, email was: ‘Guardian data being destroyed.’” (AP) | FLASHBACK: Video of Guardian editors destroying hard drives while technicians from the Brtitish intelligence agency Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) watched. (The Guardian)
  2. More Canadian papers close: Torstar’s Star Media Group will close Metro papers in Regina, Saskatchewan; Saskatoon, Saskatchewan; and London, Ontario. 25 positions will go. (Financial Post) | Metro will still have papers in seven other Canadian cities and online editions in four more. Star Media Group President John Cruickshank: “This decision does not reflect any change in our commitment to Metro’s future, both in print in larger markets and in digital in all markets.” (The Canadian Press) | Earlier this month: Torstar shut down Toronto magazine The Grid. “The media landscape continues to be impossible for a start-up,” its editor-in-chief said. (Toronto Star) | “The Grid was not a startup.” (Craig Silverman)
  3. The smoking gun? “The last two Twitter accounts that the official @TeamLeBron account followed? @ohiodotcom and @AkronBeacon.” (@EliLanger) | “Twitter feed sprinkled with reporters landing in Gaza and Cleveland.” (@MickiMaynard) | Related: Nike paid for Benjamin Markovits to write a story about LeBron James. Then it had the piece killed. (Deadspin)
  4. George Clooney racks up another USA Today byline: He does not accept the Daily Mail’s apology. “[E]ither they were lying originally or they’re lying now.” (USA Today)
  5. Madison’s Isthmus changes hands: Former Onion executives Jeff Haupt and Craig Bartlet teamed with former Green Bay Packers lineman Mark Tauscher to buy Madison, Wisconsin, alt-weekly Isthmus. (Wisconsin State Journal) | Former Isthmus owner Vince O’Hern: “I die a little bit when I think of the large part of my life that I leave behind.” (Isthmus) | “Long live the publication with the funny name.” (Isthmus)
  6. Retweets aren’t endorsements at NYT: “I think Twitter users by now understand that a retweet involves sharing or pointing something out, not necessarily advocating or endorsing,” Times standards editor Philip Corbett says. (Poynter) | “Are NPR, the AP, and Reuters’s editorial reputations really so fragile that a 140-character tweet or retweet by a staffer can blow the whole thing down?” (Reuters)
  7. Don’t expect any reality shows about being a TV critic: “Some jobs are just too hideous to contemplate,” Mike Rowe says. (Capital)
  8. How hotels ditching print newspapers affects the recycling industry: “For every major hotel chain that made these changes, it would be like eradicating newspapers from a city like Akron, Ohio, Tacoma, Wash., Birmingham, Ala. or Des Moines, Iowa.” (Waste360)
  9. MSM Weed Watch: Here’s a very good interactive guide to medical marijuana strains. (Los Angeles Times) | “Like any great accessory, a flashy vaporizer pen can be a conversation starter.” (The New York Times) | Man featured on front page purchasing pot legally says he’s losing his job (The Spokesman Review, via Jim Romenesko)
  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Julia Rubin will join Racked.com, a fashion website. She was formerly online features editor for Teen Vogue. (@juliarubin) | Johana Bhuiyan will be a tech reporter at Buzzfeed. She was a digital media reporter at Capital New York. (Muck Rack) | Rick Green is managing editor for Bloomberg Industries. Formerly, he was a senior finance editor at Bloomberg. Andrew Thurlow is a real estate, sports and retail reporter for Jacksonville Business Journal. Formerly, he was a reporter for Automotive News. (Muck Rack) | Nathan Baca will be an investigative reporter at WBNS in Columbus, Ohio. He is currently a reporter at KLAS in Las Vegas. (Mediabistro) | Sarah Gilbert will be supervising senior editor of NPR’s Weekend Edition. She is currently managing editor of Marketplace. (FishbowlDC) | Rachel Dodes is Twitter’s partner manager for motion pictures. She was previously a film reporter for the Wall Street Journal. (FishbowlNY) | Amina Akhtar will be editorial director of theFashionSpot.com. She was formerly executive editor of Elle. (Adweek) | Megan Moser will be executive editor of the Manhattan (Kansas) Mercury. Formerly, she was the paper’s news editor. (AP) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

Suggestions? Corrections? Would like me to send you this roundup each morning? Please email me: abeaujon@poynter.org.

Want more? Check out Sam Kirkland’s roundup of tech and social media news in Digital Day, and Kristen Hare’s roundup of journalism news outside the U.S. in MediaWireWorld. Read more

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Electronic and paper media concept

Only about 10 percent of online readers pay for news

Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

Despite news organizations’ efforts to offer readers more ways to pay for digital news, only about 10 percent of online users worldwide are actually paying, according to a new report from Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism at the University of Oxford. “Digital News Report 2014″ surveyed more than 18,000 people in several countries, including the U.S., U.K., Brazil and Japan.

Those findings are consistent, the report finds, with similar studies from Pew “which suggests that industry activity does not necessarily mean more individuals are paying for news but rather that ‘more revenue is being squeezed out of a smaller, or at least flat, number of paying consumers.’”

Some other findings:

– Of those who do pay for news, a higher proportion are paying for online subscriptions. The figure rose from 43 percent to 59 percent, “compared with a one-off payment like a day pass or app download.”

– Sixty-one percent of people who pay for their news around the world are male, more than half have a Master’s or Bachelor’s degree, and about 42 percent get their news on a tablet.

The report also examines mobile phones and tablets, news disruption and social networks. Read more

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French broadcasters charge beaucoup bucks to show D-Day anniversary coverage

Associated Press

Two French television stations have been given exclusive rights to film the 70th anniversary of D-Day, the Associated Press reported Friday, and they want $265,000 from other networks, including the AP and Reuters, to broadcast and livestream the events.

The French host broadcasters, France Televisions and TF1, are demanding that global news providers AP, AFP, Reuters and ENEX pay nearly 200,000 euros ($265,000) collectively for live broadcast and online streaming coverage of the official ceremonies, which feature at least 18 heads of state.

The French networks are providing coverage free to European state broadcasters, who belong to the 100-member European Broadcasting Union consortium.

U.S. troops arrive in Normandy in June 1944. (AP Photo)

Philippe Massonnet, global news director of Agence France-Presse, and Kathleen Carroll, senior vice president and executive editor of AP, both protested the decision.

“By granting access to only a few select channels and charging prohibitive sums, millions of viewers around the world will be unable to witness this historic, global event, the solemnity of which will reflect the commitment of an international array of forces 70 years ago,” Carroll said. “We believe the Elysee and its French broadcast partners should allow free and unrestricted access to all newsgathering organizations.”

AP sent out this advisory:

To all AP video clients: We regret to inform you that despite repeated assurances from the Elysee Palace that all news organisations would be granted free and fair access to live coverage of the D-Day commemorations, restrictions have now been placed on international news agencies. As a result, AP and the other global agencies can no longer guarantee comprehensive live coverage of the international ceremony. Requests to cover the event live as an agency pool have been denied. AP, AFP, Thomson Reuters and ENEX believe the Elysee and its French broadcast partners should allow free and unrestricted access to ceremonies of such global importance. We will update you as soon as we have any further information. Best regards, AP Television London

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