Articles about "Reuters"


NYT says its Gaza photos are real

BagNews

The New York Times says Atlantic senior editor David Frum is incorrect to claim that some photos taken in Gaza last week were faked or staged. “David Frum’s claims are false,” Times spokesperson Eileen Murphy told Poynter. Frum sent several tweets last week claiming the photos were faked.

“We have a complete account from the photographer, Sergey Ponomarev, who arrived with two other photographers to a local hospital as ambulances began arriving with dead and wounded civilians following an Israeli military strike on the outskirts of Khan Younis,” Murphy writes in an email.

Ponomarev “witnessed the man covered in blood in this photo arrive in an ambulance with a badly wounded elderly man (who ultimately died),” Murphy writes.… Read more

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AP F IL USA EARNS TRIBUNE

Eighteen months after dropping AP, Tribune happy with Reuters

When newspaper ad revenues were in free fall in 2008, there was much angry complaining among editors about the high cost and inflexibility of the Associated Press service. At a gripe session in Washington, one editor compared the cooperative to the USSR’s politburo.  Threats to quit were common.

In the end though, AP cut its rates, offered several levels of service and has retained the great majority of its newspaper members (who also own the cooperative and hold most its board seats).

But there was an exception.

Starting in 2009, Chicago Tribune editor Gerould Kern quietly began working with Reuters to build an acceptable substitute service.  Kern told me the Chicago Tribune ran its last AP material in March 2012.  With six other Tribune papers (but not the Los Angeles Times), it dropped AP entirely at the start of 2013.… Read more

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Why are so many news organizations still worried about retweets by staffers?

Here’s our roundup of the top digital and social media stories you should know about (and from Andrew Beaujon, 10 media stories to start your day, and from Kristen Hare, a world roundup):

— At Reuters, Jack Shafer picks up on my piece yesterday about how so many news organizations — with The New York Times being a notable exception — still seem afraid of reporters’ retweets coming across as endorsements: “Are NPR, the AP, and Reuters’s editorial reputations really so fragile that a 140-character tweet or retweet by a staffer can blow the whole thing down?”

— Three months into the “temporary” Chicago Sun-Times comments ban, publisher and editor-in-chief Jim Kirk tells Robert Feder “he’s heard no complaints lately and he’s seen no drop-off in online traffic.” Comments should return with a new CMS “sometime around the fourth quarter.”

— BuzzFeed’s director of editorial products, Alice DuBois, on the photo “slide things” in popular posts lately: “I do think there’s a part of the editorial mission to keep pushing and experimenting,” she tells Poynter’s Andrew Beaujon.… Read more

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Britain NSA Surveillance

Obama administration knew in advance about destruction of Guardian’s hard drives

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories. Want more roundups? We got ‘em! From Sam Kirkland: “Why are so many news organizations still worried about retweets by staffers?” From Kristen Hare: “Chinese journalists get a warning; press freedoms halt in South Sudan.”

  1. Obama administration knew British government planned to force Guardian to destroy hard drives with Snowden docs: AP scores emails with a FOIA request. “‘Good news, at least on this front,’ the current NSA deputy director, Richard Ledgett, said at the end of a short, censored email to then-NSA director Gen. Keith Alexander and others. The subject of that July 19, 2013, email was: ‘Guardian data being destroyed.’” (AP) | FLASHBACK: Video of Guardian editors destroying hard drives while technicians from the Brtitish intelligence agency Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) watched.
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Electronic and paper media concept

Only about 10 percent of online readers pay for news

Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

Despite news organizations’ efforts to offer readers more ways to pay for digital news, only about 10 percent of online users worldwide are actually paying, according to a new report from Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism at the University of Oxford. “Digital News Report 2014″ surveyed more than 18,000 people in several countries, including the U.S., U.K., Brazil and Japan.

Those findings are consistent, the report finds, with similar studies from Pew “which suggests that industry activity does not necessarily mean more individuals are paying for news but rather that ‘more revenue is being squeezed out of a smaller, or at least flat, number of paying consumers.’”

Some other findings:

– Of those who do pay for news, a higher proportion are paying for online subscriptions.… Read more

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French broadcasters charge beaucoup bucks to show D-Day anniversary coverage

Associated Press

Two French television stations have been given exclusive rights to film the 70th anniversary of D-Day, the Associated Press reported Friday, and they want $265,000 from other networks, including the AP and Reuters, to broadcast and livestream the events.

The French host broadcasters, France Televisions and TF1, are demanding that global news providers AP, AFP, Reuters and ENEX pay nearly 200,000 euros ($265,000) collectively for live broadcast and online streaming coverage of the official ceremonies, which feature at least 18 heads of state.

The French networks are providing coverage free to European state broadcasters, who belong to the 100-member European Broadcasting Union consortium.

U.S. troops arrive in Normandy in June 1944. (AP Photo)

Philippe Massonnet, global news director of Agence France-Presse, and Kathleen Carroll, senior vice president and executive editor of AP, both protested the decision.… Read more

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Alan Morison, Chutima Sidasathien

Reuters ‘left the little guys to take the rap,’ editor of Thai publication says

At one point, the relationship between Reuters and the English-language Thai news site Phuketwan was pretty good, Phuketwan Editor Alan Morison said in a phone call with Poynter. Reuters had hired Phuketwan reporter Chutima Sidasathian twice to help with what became a series of reports on the Rohingya, a Muslim minority group from Myanmar. The reports showed, among other things, that Thai authorities delivered Rohingya refugees to human traffickers; the series eventually won a Pulitzer.

Phuketwan, which averages about 9,000 readers a day, has reported on the Rohingya for seven years, Morison said, so “it was natural for Reuters to call me and get a briefing from me” when Stuart Grudgings and Jason Szep began reporting the series. Phuketwan even quoted a 41-word paragraph from a Reuters special report on the Rohingya (it’s not a Reuters client but wanted to point readers to Reuters’ reporting, Morison said).… Read more

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Reuters will investigate CNN plagiarist’s work

Reuters was “not aware of any concerns raised” about Marie-Louise Gumuchian’s work when she was a reporter there, Head of Corporate Affairs David Crundwell tells Poynter in an email. “However in light of press reports we are reviewing her stories.”

CNN said Friday it had dismissed Gumuchian, a news editor in London, after finding plagiarism in more than 50 of her stories. A CNN source told Poynter she had primarily lifted copy from Reuters. “She worked for us for about six months, so if we found that many in six months I can’t imagine the job Reuters has now,” the source told Craig Silverman. … Read more

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Reuters will defend ‘vigorously’ if Thai police move to arrest journalists

Agence France-Presse | Phuketwan

Reuters journalists “will be summoned in the next few days to acknowledge defamation charges” in Thailand, Agence France-Presse reports. “If they do not come, arrest warrants will be issued,” Lt. Somkid On-Jan of Phuket’s Vichit Police Station told AFP. Somkid didn’t name the journalists, but Reuters’ Stuart Grudgings and Jason Szep wrote an article about Thai authorities selling members of a Muslim minority group in Myanmar to human traffickers. It was part of a series that won a Pulitzer Prize.

“We’re aware that a captain in the Royal Thai Navy filed a criminal complaint against Reuters and two Reuters journalists, Stuart Grudgings and Jason Szep, arising out of the Rohingya coverage, and that the complaint alleges violations of the Computer Crimes Act,” David Crundwell, Thomson Reuters’ head of corporate affairs, told Poynter in an email.… Read more

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Reuters finance writer Felix Salmon is headed for Fusion. He tells why on Medium:

“Fusion, in case you’re not familiar with it, is a joint venture between ABC and Univision. It’s a TV channel aimed mainly at millennials, whose only real guiding rule is that it’s going to stay away from anything conventional…

“But the core of what I do at Fusion will be post-text. Text has had an amazing run, online, not least because it’s easy and cheap to produce. When it comes to digital storytelling, however, the possibilities — at least if you have the kind of resources that Fusion has — are much, much greater. I want to do immersive digital stuff, I want to make animations, I want to use video, I want to experiment with new ways of communicating in a new medium.”

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