Articles about "Russia"


Vladimir Putin

Russian ‘law on bloggers’ takes effect today

Hello there. Sorry this isn’t Beaujon. Here are 10 or so media stories. Happy Friday!

  1. Russian blogger law goes into effect: It could crack down on free expression, Alec Luhn explains: “Popularly known as the ‘law on bloggers,’ the legislation requires users of any website whose posts are read by more than 3,000 people each day to publish under their real name and register with the authorities if requested.” (The Guardian) | “Registered bloggers have to disclose their true identity, avoid hate speech, ‘extremist calls’ and even obscene language.” (Gigaom) | The law also states that “social networks must maintain six months of data on its users.” (BBC News)
  2. More on David Frum non-faked photo fakery saga: Photo fakery surely occurs in places like Gaza, James Fallows writes.
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Nelson Mandela

The New Yorker still fact-checks more than you do

Good morning. Here are 10 (or so) media stories.

  1. What happened between NBC News and Ayman Mohyeldin? NBC News said Friday it would return the reporter to Gaza. (HuffPost) | The clumsy move was less a conspiracy than a “news division making mistakes through ratings nervousness.” (CNN) | Here’s a Mohyeldin report from this morning. (NBC News)
  2. The new NewYorker.com launches: “The Web site already publishes fifteen original stories a day. We are promising more, as well as an even greater responsiveness to what is going on in the world.” (The New Yorker) | The publication assigns one fact-checker to its website: “And not to be defensive, but that’s one more fact-checker than probably anyone else has,” Editor David Remnick says.
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Guardian has deleted almost 500 comments from pro-Russia trolls

The Guardian

On Sunday, The Guardian’s Readers’ Editor Chris Elliott wrote about a growing problem in the comments section of stories about Ukraine — pro-Russian trolling, which one moderator told him appears to be “an orchestrated campaign.”

Trolling covers a multitude of sins but a particularly nasty strain has emerged in the midst of the armed conflict in Ukraine, which infests comment threads on the Guardian and elsewhere, despite the best efforts of moderators. Readers and reporters alike are concerned that these are from those paid to troll, and to denigrate in abusive terms anyone criticising Russia or President Vladimir Putin.

One complaint came to the readers’ editor’s office on 6 March. “In the past weeks [I] have become incredibly frustrated and disillusioned by your inability to effectively police the waves of Nashibot trolls who’ve been relentlessly posting pro-Putin propaganda in the comments on Ukraine v Russia coverage.

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MediaWireWorld: American journalist held in Ukraine, journalists kicked out of Egyptian courtroom

Ukraine

American journalist Simon Ostrovsky was captured in Eastern Ukraine, Brian Ries reported on Tuesday for Mashable. Ostrovsky is a reporter for VICE News. On Wednesday, Matt McAllester reported in Time that Time’s Berlin correspondent, Simon Shuster, and four other journalists were also detained on Monday but were later released.

The journalists were traveling in a car in the separatist-held town of Slavyansk when they were stopped at a checkpoint by armed separatists, said Shuster, who is now in the city of Donetsk. Shuster, a Ukrainian photographer and a British photojournalist for VICE left Slavyansk the morning after their detention. A Russian photographer who was part of the group chose to stay in Slavyansk.

On Wednesday, Taylor Berman reported about Ostrovsky for Gawker.

A spokeswoman for a pro-Russian militia in eastern Ukraine confirmed on Wednesday that the group has detained Vice News journalist Simon Ostrovsky on suspicion of spying and other “bad activities.”

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AP removes ‘Ukraine’ from Crimea datelines

Associated Press

Associated Press datelines from Crimea will no longer be followed with a comma and the word Ukraine. But Russia’s not taking Ukraine’s place, either.

Ukrainian servicemen in Sevastopol, Crimea, Wednesday, March 19. (AP Photo/Andrew Lubimov)

On Wednesday, Tom Kent, deputy managing editor and standards editor of the AP, wrote that “Ukraine no longer controls Crimea, and AP datelines should reflect the facts on the ground.”

From now on, following the location in Crimea, Kent wrote, will be a comma and the word Crimea. And it sounds like that’s going to be true going forward.

The reason is that Crimea is geographically distinct from Russia; they have no land border. Saying just the city name and “Crimea” in the dateline, even in the event of full annexation, would be consistent with how we handle geographically separate parts of other countries.

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