Articles about "Slate"


On Thursday, Amanda Hess wrote about the media talking down to women. In a piece called “Enough With the Ageist, Sexist Mom Jokes,” Hess wrote about a story in The New York Times on Tuesday and how the act of having a child does not actually lower IQ or the ability to understand complex topics.

I heard about “How to Explain Bitcoin to Your Mom” from my mother, of course, who spotted the item on the Times’ twitter feed. She is a New York Times subscriber (since the audience of the NYTimes.com is 52 percent female with a median age of 47, I assume moms are a key demographic for the newspaper), so she is well-aware of the paper’s near-constant coverage of the cryptocurrency, even though these articles are written using grown-up words and not pretty pictures. (The same cannot be said for my father: When I called and asked him “What is Bitcoin?,” he replied, “I’ve been asking everybody the same thing for months.”)

Amanda Hess, Slate

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Slate to introduce Amazon Prime-like membership plan

The New York Times
"Slate Plus" will launch Tuesday, Leslie Kaufman reports. While all Slate's content will remain available for free, readers who pay $5 per month (or $50 per year) will get "special access to the site’s editors and writers, as well as members-only discussions with Emily Yoffe, Slate’s Dear Prudence advice columnist." They'll also get input into profiles, ad-free podcasts and discounts on events.

“Our model is Amazon Prime, which keeps adding benefits,” Slate Editor David Plotz told Kaufman.

In late 2012, Jeff Bercovici reported Slate might be considering a paywall. (The company tried one long ago but didn't think it worked.) Paywalls “don’t make sense for a site like ours,” Weisberg told me at the time. He did say Slate was looking at a membership model.
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Let’s thank women’s magazines for quizzes

Slate | Time | Mashable
Have you Travolta-fied your name yet? (I'd be really surprised if you haven't; the name-generator from Slate has been "the most popular post Slate had ever done–yes, even more than thinkpieces on Jonathan Livingston Seagull!" James Poniewozik wrote for Time on Wednesday.)





In "Why Name Generators and Quizzes Are the New Crosswords," Poniewozik wrote about those quizzes and why they don't mean an end to good journalism. (more...)
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Slate’s good strategy for correcting errors on Twitter, elsewhere

On Saturday night, Slate made a very funny, embarrassing error on Twitter:

Javier Bardem and Vladimir Putin aren’t exactly lookalikes. It’s a funny mistake, and thanks to … Read more

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Correction: Atlanta may only lose a quarter of its trees today

But that's still a lot of trees.


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Slate’s top error-spotter delivers another great correction

Back in 2007, Slate did a rare thing: it profiled a reader who was a prolific spotter of errors in Slate articles.

Jack Shafer, at the time Slate’s media critic, wrote a column that described regular reader RM “Auros” Harman Read more

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Washington Post columnist Richard Cohen speaks during a Court TV panel discussion debating the use of confidential sources in journalism on Aug. 16, 2005, in New York. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

Richard Cohen will keep writing ‘until Gawker sends over a hit man’

The Washington Post | The Wrap | The Huffington Post | The Atlantic | Slate | Mother Jones | Salon "I don’t have a problem with interracial marriage or same-sex marriage," Richard Cohen told Washington Post reporter Paul Farhi. Cohen was talking about the rage, outrage and disgust that greeted his column about Chris Christie and the tea party, which included this riff about interracial marriage:
People with conventional views must repress a gag reflex when considering the mayor-elect of New York — a white man married to a black woman and with two biracial children. (Should I mention that Bill de Blasio’s wife, Chirlane McCray, used to be a lesbian?) This family represents the cultural changes that have enveloped parts — but not all — of America. To cultural conservatives, this doesn’t look like their country at all.
Farhi offers a look back at other times Cohen's words have outraged people, writing, "Cohen said he still enjoys writing his weekly column and intends to keep at it as long as the paper will have him. Or 'until Gawker sends over a hit man,' he said." (more...)
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60 Minutes apologizes for botched Benghazi report: A timeline

CBS News | Huffington Post | The New York Times | Slate | The Daily Beast Friday morning, "60 Minutes" correspondent Lara Logan apologized for a report on Benghazi marred by conflicting stories from the show's key source, contractor Dylan Davies. Until Friday morning, Logan and CBS have stood by their reporting. "The most important thing to every person at '60 Minutes' is the truth," Logan said on "CBS This Morning." "And today, the truth is that we made a mistake." That mistake first aired on "60 Minutes" October 27. It centered on the account of "Morgan Jones." Here's what's happened since. (more...)
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Slate debuts new design that makes stories more prominent than logo

Slate | The Washington Post | Ad Age
A redesigned Slate debuted Monday morning. The publication had outgrown its old site, Editor David Plotz writes: "We publish three times as many stories as we did five years ago. Where we once had a handful of blogs, we now have 19."

The new site is responsive, to look better on mobile devices, and it allows multiple homepage layouts, Plotz writes. The site's homepage editor can now "sculpt" the page "to capture the kind of news day we’re having, whether that means featuring a blaring headline, a poignant image, or a powerful quotation," senior product manager David Stern says in another piece.

Slate's homepage Monday morning.
(more...)
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Slate will no longer call Washington football team ‘Redskins’

Slate | DCist
"Here’s a quick thought experiment," Slate Editor David Plotz writes. "Would any team, naming itself today, choose 'Redskins' or adopt the team’s Indian-head logo? Of course it wouldn’t."

The team's nickname is "not an open-and-shut outrage like the still-used nickname 'Savages,'" Plotz writes, but "it’s extremely tacky and dated—like an old aunt who still talks about 'colored people' or limps her wrist to suggest someone’s gay."
To be clear, though we’re striking the word from our vocabulary, we will not bowdlerize quotes—if a public official utters the nickname in a newsworthy speech, we will not strike the word Redskins.
As Plotz points out, other media outlets shun the name. The Washington City Paper -- where I used to work and which Redskins owner Dan Snyder once sued over an article he hadn't read -- announced last October it would call the team the "Pigskins." DCist gave it up in February. (more...)
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