Articles about "Social media"


Facebook and Twitter Applications on Ipad

Times of India publisher to staffers: Give us your social media passwords if you’re posting news

Hey, it’s Tuesday. Media stories coming your way!

  1. Strict, strange social-media policy at Times of India: Bennett, Coleman and Company Ltd staffers have been told not to post news stories from their personal social media accounts; instead, they must create company-authorized accounts, according to Quartz India. Even weirder: the company — which publishes The Times of India and The Economic Times — “will possess log-in credentials to such accounts and will be free to post any material to the account without journalists’ knowledge,” Sruthijith KK reports. (Quartz India) | Quartz-related: How often should a site launch a redesign, like Quartz just did? Mario Garcia: “The answer varies, and there is a basic principle I follow: redesign (and/or rethink) when you need it.” (Garcia Media)
  2. NYT’s controversial Michael Brown profile: New York Times public editor Margaret Sullivan writes that calling Michael Brown “no angel” in a profile of the 18-year-old killed by police in Ferguson, Missouri, was “a blunder.” (Public Editor’s Journal) | Times national editor Alison Mitchell told Erik Wemple that the phrase derived from the story’s lead, which told an anecdote about Brown seeing a vision of an angel.
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Newspaper asks staffers to refrain from tweeting other outlets’ stories

Mint

Editors at India’s The Hindu asked staffers to “exercise restraint while tweeting or sharing news stories from other competing news publications,” Vidhi Choudhary reports in Mint.

“We need particularly to ensure that in our enthusiasm and urge to participate in an on-line discussion or debate, we do not end up doing a favour to the competition,” the note from Managing Editor P. Jacob and Senior Managing Editor V. Jayanth reads.

Hindu Editor-in-Chief N. Ravi told Choudhary the guidance was “in line with the social media policies of other international media organizations like The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, Reuters among others.” Mint notes the Journal, with which it has an exclusive content-sharing partnership in India, “actually doesn’t prohibit its reporters from sharing or retweeting stories by journalists in other media organizations.”

The New York Times doesn’t have a formal social media policy; “in general our message is that people should be thoughtful,” standards editor Phil Corbett told Poynter in 2012.… Read more

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3 tips from BBC News’ Chris Hamilton for battling rumors on social media

On Sunday and Monday, BBC News social media editor Chris Hamilton spent some time batting down a rumor on Twitter that said the BBC had pulled Middle East editor Jeremy Bowen from Gaza. The reports started with this tweet, from Raajje News:

Hamilton replied within an hour:

That original tweet was retweeted more than 1,000 times. Hamilton replied to a lot of people who passed on the news. (On Aug. 1, Bowen tweeted that he was on vacation.)

Here are three tips we can take from Hamilton on dealing with rumors on social media.… Read more

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Retweets are endorsements at NPR and AP, but not at NYT

NPR is still worried that retweets can easily be misconstrued as endorsements, according to a memo from standards and practices supervising editor Mark Memmott obtained by Jim Romenesko.

According to Memmott, “despite what many say, retweets should be viewed AS endorsements.” He quoted from NPR’s ethics handbook:

“Tweet and retweet as if what you’re saying or passing along is information that you would put on the air or in a ‘traditional’ NPR.org news story. If it needs context, attribution, clarification or ‘knocking down,’ provide it.”

The reiterated policy of treating every retweet as a message that could be dangerously misconstrued comes in light of an education blogger lamenting on an official NPR account that “only the white guys get back to me” on deadline.… Read more

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Facebook and Twitter Applications on Ipad

Social media roundup: Gawker, USA Today, LA Times open up with tips and insights

Automated tweets get less engagement than handcrafted ones, WhatsApp is making inroads at a USA Today sports site, and sometimes all you can do when a years-old piece takes off on Facebook is shrug.

It’s been a good week for gleaning insights from media outlets, which seem increasingly willing to share which social strategies are working for them. Here’s a rundown of recent social media news you might have missed:

Human tweets RSS tweets

Los Angeles Times social media editor Stacey Leasca shared some tips on Twitter’s media blog this week.

Among her insights was the fact that moving from RSS tweets improved engagement. It’s no surprise that a human touch makes a difference, but it’s interesting to see how much the change seems to have increased the rate at which the newspaper’s accounts are gaining new followers:

A perfect example of this is, again, @LANow.

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How Muck Rack’s social media tool lets journalists track content sharing

Muck Rack

Here’s a handy social media tool you might not be aware of: Muck Rack’s Who Shared My Link feature. Simply paste any link, and it shows you how many times it was shared on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and more. There’s even a button for your bookmarks bar so you can instantly see social shares for whatever page you’re on.

Sara Morrison wrote about the feature last year for CJR. As Muck Rack CEO Gregory Galant told her: “Since pageviews are known only to the publishers, who usually embellish the numbers before releasing them, ‘shares’ is one of the few metrics that are public and equal across the Web.”

Muck Rack announced on Tuesday that it added the ability to generate PDF summaries of how a link performed on social media (you have to be a Muck Rack Pro member or a verified journalist to access the PDF reports — and a list of Muck Rack users who shared your link).… Read more

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parselylogo

Report: readers more loyal to large news sites

The latest report by analytics firm Parse.ly indicates large news sites see a greater percentage of visitors return within 30 days than small news sites do.

That finding runs counter to the company’s internal hypothesis that niche sites would have higher return rates, the company said in an email. Sites with more than 10 million monthly visitors saw a 16 percent return rate, while sites with fewer than 1 million monthly visitors saw a 9 percent return rate.

The company’s March sample included 500 million visitors and over 2 billion page views. Across Parse.ly’s entire network, an average of 11 percent of visitors returned to a site within 30 days.

Last month, Poynter wrote about Chartbeat and New York magazine’s effort to track what converts one-time visitors into loyal, returning readers.… Read more

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Twitter IPO

Who owns your Twitter followers?

This is the latest in a series of articles by The Poynter Institute and the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press on legal issues affecting journalists. Poynter’s Ellyn Angelotti is an attorney and teaches social media issues.

Social media regularly blurs lines when it comes to journalists’ personal and professional lives. We often post pictures of our pets and children alongside posts related to our work. One unintended consequence is this can create ambiguity about who ultimately owns your Twitter account.

Organizations and brands seek employees who can effectively build an audience using social media. However, once an employee builds a healthy community of followers and then leaves the organization, who do the followers belong to?

Some instances are clearer than others.

Journalists who create an account associated with a beat and then exit the organization often leave their account and start a new one.… Read more

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Americans twice as likely to believe news organizations than social media

Associated Press | American Press Institute

No matter how old they are, people surveyed for a new study by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research and the American Press Institute were “more than twice as likely to express high levels of trust about what they learn directly from a news organization (43 percent say they trust it mostly or completely) as they are to trust what they discovered through social media.”

15 percent of those who get news through social media “say they have high levels of trust in information they get from that means of discovery,” the study says. 13 percent of people under 30 said social was their preferred source for news. 3 percent of all other age groups said the same thing.… Read more

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Shown are the main offices of the San Francisco Chronicle newspaper in San Francisco, Friday, March 13, 2009.(AP Photo/Eric Risberg)

S.F. Chronicle social ‘boot camp’ changing culture, practices

The 148-year-old San Francisco Chronicle has invested in an off-site incubator for its journalists to learn about and experiment with a variety of digital tools, including social media. PBS Media Shift explored goals of the “boot camp” in January.

Now that the effort is underway, I reached out to Marcus Gilmer, newsroom social media manager at the Chronicle and Sfgate.com. (He and I worked together at the Chicago Sun-Times last year.) Gilmer joined the Chronicle in December and has spent time at the incubator teaching social media skills and tools to reporters and editors. (This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.)… Read more

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