Articles about "Sponsored content"


Denver Post strengthens sponsored content designation on energy section

Center for Western Priorities | ThinkProgress | Wonkette
Following articles that said a Denver Post-sponsored energy section wasn't marked clearly enough, Post President and CEO Mac Tully told Poynter in an email the paper decided to "strengthen the sponsored content designation and included a definition of custom content." Tully said he hadn't "seen one complaint that misunderstood the content to be Denver Post generated."

The change comes after reports in several publications about the "Energy and Environment" section, which is sponsored content from Coloradans for Responsible Energy Development, a group formed by Anadarko Petroleum Corp. and Noble Energy "to provide scientifically sound information about fracking."

The section looks too much like regular Denver Post content, Erin Moriarty writes for the Center for Western Priorities: "Advertising is, of course, crucial to newspapers’ existence, but there is a line that has been crossed."

A "former Denver Post staffer who asked not to be named" told ThinkProgress' Katie Valentine, “If I weren’t a journalist, I’m not sure I could tell the difference here.”

(As long as we're discussing the Post's decisions, why on earth did ThinkProgress let a former employee zing his former employer under cover of anonymity? "​​The source was concerned about the impact of commenting publicly on his current employment," TP Editor-in-Chief Judd Legum told Poynter in an email. "We wanted to try to get various perspectives in the piece and thought it was valuable to include." Here's more of me spouting off about anonymity.)

Tully said the paper's "goal is to be just as clear online as we have been in the print editions by clearly designating the custom content as advertiser sponsored. We feel that's the key to maintaining the separation of news and paid content."

In a funny post about the section, Wonkette's Doktor Zoom made a discovery about the section: "If you have Adblock Plus turned on, everything but 'The Denver Post: Energy and Environment' is blocked out."
Tools:
1 Comment
Screen Shot 2014-03-27 at 12.03.44 PM

How AOL maintains editorial independence in Ford-sponsored ‘This Built America’ series

When an AOL team with an editorial vision joined a video production team with an artistic vision to launch an ambitious 50-week series about people and companies rebuilding America, it was clear they needed a brand to help fund it.… Read more

Tools:
0 Comments
chat green glossy icon on white background

Understanding opportunities and challenges in sponsored content (Replay chat)

Shane Snow, cofounder with two friends of Contently, manages a network of 25,000 freelancers. According to Contently’s website, the sweet spot where these freelancers thrive is creating content for “brands, nonprofits, and lean new media companies.”

Snow and his … Read more

Tools:
1 Comment
Media Signpost Showing Internet Television Newspapers Magazines And Radio

No new TV viewers or newspaper subscribers are being born, BuzzFeed president says

Speaking at a NewsCred conference last week, BuzzFeed President Jon Steinberg talked about his theory that content, and the ways it is distributed, will be "completely decoupled, I would say, in the next five years."

The average television viewer right now, for right now, for network television, late 40s, early 50s. When you look at certain cable news networks it goes even higher. So you have one of two possibilities: Either at 47 years old, everybody starts watching television. Unlikely. Or there's no new newspaper subscribers being born, for print. And there's no new television viewers being born. I think that's probably the likely choice. However, people love great content. There are shows on those networks people love to watch. There's the Netflix content that people undeniably love to watch. And what that means is you can never fight the consumer, you can never fight a trend like this, so you're going to see these things totally decoupled. What that means for brand marketers in the audience is that you will literally be on the same footing as anyone creating television programming, anyone creating video programming, anyone creating content programming of any kind.
(The quote above starts here.)

Pew has consistently found that the audience for news on TV and print has aged, and a recent report claimed that "by 2015, almost half of all television viewing will be done by folks over the age of 50."

Younger viewers' viewing habits create a "dilemma for the TV industry, which wants to put more content online but at the same time needs to protect the television screen," Joe Flint writes.

Writes [media analyst Todd] Juenger: "They can choose to try to capture more online dollars for themselves, but the more they encourage their viewers to eschew traditional TV, the more they hasten the demise of their core business — especially if it ultimately enables cord-cutting."

Tools:
2 Comments
Slate2

Slate debuts new design that makes stories more prominent than logo

Slate | The Washington Post | Ad Age
A redesigned Slate debuted Monday morning. The publication had outgrown its old site, Editor David Plotz writes: "We publish three times as many stories as we did five years ago. Where we once had a handful of blogs, we now have 19."

The new site is responsive, to look better on mobile devices, and it allows multiple homepage layouts, Plotz writes. The site's homepage editor can now "sculpt" the page "to capture the kind of news day we’re having, whether that means featuring a blaring headline, a poignant image, or a powerful quotation," senior product manager David Stern says in another piece.

Slate's homepage Monday morning.
(more...)
Tools:
0 Comments
Advertising4

Quartz expects to be profitable by 2015, with help of native ads

The Media Briefing
Quartz publisher Jay Lauf expects the site to be profitable by 2015, The Media Briefing's Jasper Jackson reports. The business news site has had success with native ads, partly because it is continuously looking for ways to improve them.

"Any of these things you come up with around return on investment will be caught up with at some point, so it's more about how can we iterate and improve our ad product so it does better. We're doing really consultative ad-products in understanding what works on the site," [Lauf] says.

"We're even pushing back on advertisers when they want something, saying it won't work as well as something else. We're trying to be more service oriented."
Lauf says Quartz doesn't plan to charge for content and wants to "create as little friction as possible for people to share...content and experience it in their streams." The site, which is owned by the Atlantic Media Company, gets about 3.5 million unique visitors a month and had 5 million in July, Jackson reports. (more...)
Tools:
0 Comments

AstraZeneca sponsors tweets from AP today

The pharmaceutical giant AstraZeneca sponsored tweets by the Associated Press Tuesday.

Each one has inspired yowls of pain from people surprised by this form of audience monetization. (more...)
Tools:
0 Comments

Monocle EIC: ‘All good journalists are good salespeople too’

Digiday | LinkedIn | iMediaEthics
We absolutely never, ever use the term native advertising,” Monocle Editor-in-Chief Tyler Brûlé tells Alex Kantrowitz about his publication's embrace of branded content.

If the company’s infrastructure blurs the church-and-state divide between editorial and sales, it’s by design. Editors accompany ad directors on sales calls. “I’m of the opinion that all good journalists are good salespeople too,” Brûlé said. While the ad team discusses pricing and tries to close the business, editors give Monocle’s potential clients insight into the publication’s editorial calendar and explain the reasoning behind certain editorial decisions.
The payoff? A campaign for Samsung "brought in roughly one million dollars and native ads can, depending on the month, account for up to one quarter of Monocle’s total revenue," Kantrowitz reports. (more...)
Tools:
0 Comments

Report: NYT will consider more sponsored content, with advice from BuzzFeed

Bloomberg
The New York Times Co. "is considering letting advertisers sponsor more stories on its website," Edmund Lee reports. Lee writes that Times Co. CEO Mark Thompson and Chairman Arthur Sulzberger have had several meetings about the idea, and that "outside executives such as BuzzFeed CEO Jonah Peretti were brought in to talk about creating successful 'native ads,' which often take the form of sponsored stories."

Times Co. Advertising Vice President Todd Haskell told Lee the company is considering "ways you can use journalistic storytelling techniques in how you could present a narrative for our clients without misleading or confusing the reader.” Times Executive Editor Jill Abramson said recently she worried about "leaving confusion in readers' minds about where the content comes from, and purposefully making advertising look like a news story."

The Times is already using sponsored content on one of its mobile apps.

Previously: New York Times Co., Hearst Magazines introduce native advertising
Tools:
0 Comments

New York Times Co., Hearst Magazines introduce native advertising

Nieman Lab | New York Times Co. | Adweek
The New York Times Co. and Hearst Magazines are among the latest publishers to introduce advertising presented as editorial content in their mobile and digital spaces.

Native advertising is advertising that resembles an article in its host publication but is actually provided by an advertiser or outside company. The Times is using native advertising provided by bike-sharing company Citi Bike in its "things-to-do" app The Scoop. Joshua Benton checks it out:
If most native advertising tries to make sponsor-provided content look a bit like a news article, this tries to make it look a bit like a regular ol’ tab in a mobile app. What’s interesting is that the “content” here is less a collection of words and pictures than a real-time data service. It’s a callback to the classic news advertising idea — we assemble the audience, you provide the content, we make a match — in a mobile, apped-up world. It’s a compelling match.
Executive Vice President for the Times' Digital Products and Services Group Denise Warren explained how the advertising fits with The Scoop's purpose as an app, in a press release: (more...)
Tools:
0 Comments