Articles about "Sports reporting"


Ferrara_Lou_AP

Live chat replay: What sports journalists need to know to compete

In remarks for the College Media Association conference in New York on March 13, Associated Press Vice President Lou Ferrara issued a wake-up call for sports reporters.

He said traditional sports journalism is changing, that game coverage is waning and … Read more

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Custom camera-mounted device lets Toronto Star photographers file direct to live blog

The Canadian Journalism Project It's hard to file photos from Toronto's Air Canada Centre, Toronto Star visuals editor Taras Slawnych tells Mark Taylor: "There are lights around the arena and every time these neon lights and billboard signs go on it creates a lot of interference. Traditional ways of submitting with a WiFi card or some other way just didn’t work." So the Star built its own device, called AWAC -- for "Automated Web Access Coupling." It sits "on the hot shoe mount," Slawnych says, and "basically provides the Internet connection, the routing of it, and then sends the picture to an FTP site. There’s a (HTML) script here that handles it and then there’s another script that sends it to a ScribbleLive blog and the (Toronto Star) archive at the same time." Slawnych says he's not sure whether the Star will patent the device -- other reporters "are trying to figure out what the hell we’re doing," he says -- but did allow that it was 3-D printed and that the Star has spent about $2,500 developing it. The device solves a workflow problem other technical solutions to filing in the field don't, Slawnych says:
Traditional wire agencies have a whole bunch of things to do this as well. The problem is the traditional workflow. Let’s say it’s a wire photographer shooting the game like we did. He sends the picture, and he’s probably sending it just as fast as we are. The picture then goes to headquarters and is then put on the wires. There’s probably a minute delay, maybe 30 seconds even. The picture is then sent out to an FTP to newspapers around the world. Then you’ve got a processor from your archive that is picking up these shots every 30 seconds, every minute. To put that picture online, you have to publish that picture onto your pagination system and wait for it to appear there. That’s probably another 30 seconds and then you have to move it onto your online Content Management System, which is probably minimum 30 seconds. And that’s if everyone is watching everything and has the time to do that. So that’s at least two, three minutes if every step worked out perfectly, which I doubt because there’s going to be other pictures moving on the wire. The editor that’s pulling that picture might not be paying attention because he’s doing other stuff at the same time. Our picture, without anyone having to touch it here, is on our blog within 45 seconds.
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Joe Paterno, Mike McQueary, Matt McGloin

ESPN reports Mike McQueary was sexually assaulted, but says little else

In this photo taken Sept. 24, 2011, then-Penn State head football coach Joe Paterno, left, talks with quarterback Matt McGloin (11) as assistant coach Mike McQueary listens on the sidelines during an NCAA college football game against Eastern Michigan in
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USA vs. CHN Curling

Sochi photo coverage takes ‘patience, planning, logistics’

Harry Walker, photo director at McClatchy-Tribune Information Services, has a unique vantage point overseeing MCT’s visual coverage of the Olympic Games.

Raised in Savannah, Ga., Walker graduated from Morehouse College in 1980. He started his photojournalism career at The Columbus … Read more

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ESPN shuffles sports, news leadership

Broadcasting & Cable | Capital New York | SportsBusiness Daily
ESPN shifted the responsibilities and titles of top sports and news executives in a consolidation of its programming and production operations, reports Broadcasting & Cable's Tom Baysinger.
News Director Vince Doria plans to retire early next year and his responsibilities will move to Craig Bengtson, vice president/director of news. Doria will report to Rob King, SportsCenter and news senior vice president, who shifts from digital and print to oversee the SportsCenter and newsgathering operations. King is a member of Poynter's National Advisory Board.
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This photo taken Aug. 2013 shows New England Patriots quarterback Tim Tebow throwing during warmups before a NFL preseason football game against the Detroit Lions in Detroit. There wasn't much reason to dislike Tim Tebow, who never pretended to be anything he wasn't. Blame him for the Tebowing craze, if you will, but even that was worth a few laughs in a league that doesn't always embrace fun. There wasn't much reason to like him as an NFL quarterback, either. Three teams tried their best to make use of his unique talents, but even Bill Belichick couldn't find a way to turn him into a competent QB. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

How Sports Illustrated reporter captured the athlete in ‘The Book of Tebow’

Earlier this year, Sports Illustrated writer Thomas Lake embarked on a challenging project: to profile Tim Tebow, an athlete who’s been covered as thoroughly as any in America and who didn’t want Lake to write about him.

With limited access … Read more

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Fath Carter regrets doing interview with Sports Illustrated after being accused of making ‘unfounded’ statements

ESPN | KOTV
Responding to questions about the validity of statements he provided to Sports Illustrated, Fath Carter says he "should have never interviewed with SI."

Sports Illustrated had interviewed Carter, a former Oklahoma State football player, for a series about improprieties in the school's football program. The series found that players were being paid and given favorable grades.

ESPN's Brett McMurphy said many of Carter's statements in the series were inconsistent with documents ESPN obtained.
Among the claims by Carter that are not supported by university documents were that he graduated from the school and attended classes in 2004 with running back Tatum Bell in which the professor gave them failing grades because their eligibility had expired.

Another discrepancy was from running back Dexter Pratt, who told SI that in his first semester, in 2009, every course he took was online. According to university records, Pratt took three online courses and two actual classes.
Former player Tatum Bell has also disputed some of Carter's statements involving him.

Carter says he "only told [SI] I had a background in education" and that "never told them anything about having two degrees," according to Oklahoma's KOTV.
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RELIANT

What the ESPN/Frontline breakup teaches us about investigative reporting

As we put the pieces together in this week’s ESPN/Frontline breakup, we’ve learned something about investigative journalism: it’s incredibly difficult for a news organization to hold its own partners accountable.

That may have been obvious. But for the 18 … Read more

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Fenway Park

Through in-person training, inner-city teens learn what it takes to be sports reporters

Last summer, I walked into a computer lab in the bowels of The Boston Globe carrying a stack of photocopied worksheets from the High School Journalism Institute and eager to pass my sportswriting knowledge along to three inner-city students from … Read more

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RELIANT

ESPN confirms it will hire bloggers to cover every NFL team

ESPN will hire bloggers to cover every NFL team, Rob King confirmed by phone Monday afternoon. "If you're going to place a bet anywhere, place it on the NFL," said King, ESPN's senior vice president for content, digital & print media.

Jason McIntyre reported last June that ESPN planned the hires, but ESPN wouldn't comment. Monday John Keim announced he was leaving The Washington Post to cover the Redskins for ESPN, and news broke earlier this month that Mike Wells had left the Indianapolis Star for the sports giant.

ESPN already has local sites that cover sports in New York, Chicago, Boston, Dallas and Los Angeles, as well as blogs that cover individual NFL conferences. "Everyone's staying on," said King, who is a member of Poynter's National Advisory Board. All in all, ESPN planned 19 new hires, King said, and the network has decisions or offers out on all but three spots. (more...)
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