Articles about "The Atlantic"


NPR’s head of programming to retire

NPR

Ellen McDonnell, NPR’s executive editor for news programming, will retire at the end of the year, Eyder Peralta reported for the network today.

McDonnell had been at the network for nearly 35 years and was “a part of NPR’s DNA,” NPR Chief Content Officer Kinsey Wilson said in an internal memo quoted in Peralta’s story:

“She has touched and transformed nearly every aspect of NPR News, her creativity and zeal surpassed only by her generosity of spirit. When you describe Ellen the words you hear over and over are transparent and authentic. She is the real deal.”

In July, NPR’s senior vice president for news, Margaret Low Smith, left the network to join the Atlantic as president of the company’s events division. NPR got a new president and CEO in Jarl Mohn in May.… Read more

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Hand reaching from the grave

How your byline could outlive you

Good morning. September. Media stories. Let’s do this.

  1. Facebook may not be publishers’ friend: Editorial decisions are increasingly replaced by Facebook’s opaque algorithm, Emily Bell writes: “Accountability is not part of Silicon Valley’s culture. But surely as news moves beyond paper and publisher, it must become so.” (The Guardian) | Related: “Get ready to see a new set of Facebook publishers who see big and mysterious traffic boosts in the near future, as Facebook rolls out its autoplaying video.” (Re/code)
  2. Who will run Condé after Si? At some point Si Newhouse will no longer run the company. Soon-to-be-former Fairchild honcho Gina Sanders is someone to watch, Joe Pompeo writes. (Capital)
  3. What you need to know about this Jennifer Lawrence nude-pictures thing: The FBI is investigating how naked photos of several celebrities ended up online.
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3 ways to prevent your apology from becoming the story

On Wednesday, The Atlantic’s David Frum apologized after accusing The New York Times and other news organizations of faking photos at a Gaza hospital. And then he kept talking. So now we have more stories.

Here are three tips on how to apologize so that your apology doesn’t become the story. Study them, and you may be able to shut down some bad press.

1. Do it. Then hush.

In 2012, Poynter’s Andrew Beaujon wrote “How journalists bungle apologies: They keep talking.”

Here is how you apologize: “I’m sorry.” Maybe “We’re sorry.” If your apology includes the words “if,” “but,” or especially “however” it is not an apology. It’s a justification, which is not the same thing.

I’m adding “also” to the list.

Frum started this on Twitter.… Read more

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New York Times Slim

NYT acknowledges Carol Vogel lifted from Wikipedia

Good morning. 10-ish, anyone?

  1. NYT acknowledges Carol Vogel lifted from Wikipedia: Part of a July 25 column “used specific language and details from a Wikipedia article without attribution; it should not have been published in that form,” a grisly editor’s note reads. (NYT) | Times spokesperson Eileen Murphy told Ravi Somaiya “editors have dealt with Carol on the issue.” (NYT) | “It seems to me that there can be little dispute about the claim,” Times Public Editor Margaret Sullivan wrote Wednesday. “Anyone can see the similarity.” (NYT)
  2. E.W. Scripps Co. and Journal Communications will combine broadcast properties, spin off newspapers: The companies “are so similar and share the deep commitment to public service through enterprise journalism,” Scripps Chairman Richard A.
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Fareed Zakaria to join Atlantic Media as contributing editor

The Atlantic

Fareed Zakaria, host of CNN’s “Fareed Zakaria GPS,” will join The Atlantic and Quartz as a contributing editor beginning in September, Atlantic Media announced today in a press release.

Zakaria will cover “pressing world matters and culture”, and his work will appear both in the magazine and on TheAtlantic.com, according to Atlantic Media:

“As part of this new relationship, he will write for The Atlantic as well as participate in events for both AtlanticLIVE and Quartz, Atlantic Media’s global business news brand. His first outing will be with Quartz’s flagship The Next Billion: A Connected World Conference in New York in November.”

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Margaret Low Smith: ‘It will ache to walk out the door’

After The Atlantic announced today it was hiring Margaret Low Smith, the senior vice president for news at NPR, her email inbox was inundated with messages.

It was a “slight out-of-body experience,” said Low, who will head up The Atlantic’s live events division.

The new job might seem like a big change for Smith, who oversees the day-to-day operations of NPR’s news division — but the two jobs do have one strong similarity, she said.… Read more

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Margaret Low Smith leaves NPR for The Atlantic

NPR senior vice president for news Margaret Low Smith will join the Atlantic as a vice president and the president of the Atlantic’s events division, according to a press release Tuesday. Her departure “will be a hard parting,” NPR chief content officer Kinsey Wilson told staffers in a note (below).

Smith joined NPR in 1982. She’s been in charge of news since 2011. She got that job officially the next year. In 2012, Smith talked with Poynter about NPR’s Ethics Handbook, which emerged after a turbulent period at the radio network.

Chris Turpin will be acting head of news, Wilson tells staffers. The organization “will announce plans for a permanent search as soon they are finalized,” NPR spokesperson Isabel Lara tells Poynter in an email.… Read more

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What makes a tweet likely to be retweeted? Plus, mobile ad revenue to surpass newspapers

Here’s our roundup of the top digital and social media stories you should know about (and from Andrew Beaujon, 10 media stories to start your day, and from Kristen Hare, a world roundup):

— What makes a tweet likely to be retweeted? An algorithm developed at Cornell thinks it knows, and you can test your predictive powers against it in an interactive quiz at The New York Times by Mike Bostock, Josh Katz and Nilkanth Patel.

— According to eMarketer, revenue from smartphone and tablet ads will surpass revenue from radio, magazine and newspaper ads for the first time this year, Robert Hof writes at Forbes. Mobile will still trail television and desktop/laptop ad revenue, though.

— Mashable’s Brian Ries has a roundup of fascinating Twitter data from yesterday’s U.S.-Belgium World Cup match.… Read more

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In-tweet purchases could be imminent, and why sports media are better innovators

Here’s our roundup of the top digital and social media stories you should know about (and from Andrew Beaujon, 10 media stories to start your day, and from Kristen Hare, a world roundup):

— In-tweet purchases might be coming to Twitter soon, according to screenshots shared by Re/code’s Jason Del Rey.

— At CJR, Sara Morrison explains why sports journalists have often been more willing to innovate: Pre-digital, “sports features tended to be the first things cut for space,” but “the internet solved that problem, and also allowed print journalists to match the pace of their television colleagues.”

— World Cup GIFs tweeted by @ReplayLastGoal are a copyright violation, FIFA is claiming, and ESPN and Univision have cracked down on Vine accounts from SB Nation and a video posted by Slate.… Read more

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The Day in Digital: Inside the New York Times CMS and the impending Amazon phone

Content management systems are so in this season. Luke Vnenchak has a fascinating look inside Scoop, The New York Times’s “homegrown digital and (soon-to-be) print CMS.”

Jeff Bezos is expected to announce an Amazon smartphone today. How can the company compete with Apple, Android and Samsung? Quartz’s Dan Frommer has some thoughts on the strategy.

The Atlantic’s in good shape, for lots of reasons. Here’s another one, from a Jeff Sonderman tweet during American Press Institute’s summit on video:

Media critics weren’t critical enough of Aaron Kushner’s print-centric strategy at the Orange County Register, Clay Shirky writes, helping to poison the minds of young people who need to understand that print is in a death spiral from which it can’t recover.… Read more

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