Articles about "The Columbus Dispatch"


Columbus’ Other Paper will close later this month

The Other Paper
Columbus, Ohio, alt-weekly The Other Paper will close at the end of January. It’s owned by the Dispatch Printing Company, which publishes the Columbus Dispatch, as well as an A&E paper called Alive!

“In viewing the research of who reads the two publications, and after hearing from the local advertising community, it became more and more obvious that one publication would better serve our readers and advertisers,” said Michael Fiorile, President and Chief Operating Officer of The Dispatch Printing Co.

The Other Paper was sold to the Dispatch Printing Company in 2011.

Related: Two former staffers at Albuquerque, N.M.’s Weekly Alibi start a nonprofit news site after one of them gets laid off (Santa Fe Reporter)

Previously: Sun-Times ownership of Chicago Reader would be unusual in alt-weekly worldRead more

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Columbus Dispatch editor: Front page errors ‘made me want to vomit’

Here’s one newspaper editor who doesn’t mince words when it comes to mistakes.

Columbus Dispatch Editor Benjamin J. Marrison wrote a Sunday column to admit and explain some recent, embarrassing errors in the paper. At the top of the list of regrettable mistakes was the fact the Dispatch twice misspelled the first name of President Barack Obama — and on the front page, to boot. From Marrison:

In the past few weeks we’ve made a series of blunders — each minor — that individually did not ring alarm bells but collectively made me ill.

Thursday’s front page made me want to vomit.

It’s embarrassing to type the next six words, but I must: We misspelled the president’s first name.

And we did it twice.

Granted, Barack Obama’s first name isn’t a simple one, like George or Bill, but we should never misspell that name.

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Columbus Dispatch pulls ‘homeless voice’ video off YouTube

Lost Remote
At the request of The Columbus Dispatch, YouTube has removed an unauthorized copy of its “homeless voice” video after the segment went viral, gaining 12 million views and a new voice-over career for a local homeless man, Ted Williams.

The video gained nationwide attention after someone copied it from The Dispatch’s website and uploaded it to YouTube. Since then, Williams has appeared on the “Today” show and has received voice-over offers from a number of companies.

The Dispatch was completely within its rights to ask YouTube to remove the video, which clearly was a copyright infringement. Of course, new YouTube versions are bound to continue to appear.

But, as Cory Bergman writes, the value in Williams’ story is that it went viral:

“It must be maddening for The Dispatch, but welcome to the new reality of social distribution.

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