Articles about "The Economist"


Yellow What the Barrier Tape

AP: ‘Damn’ and ‘hell’ OK, but not most other profanity

Associated Press | The Economist "I’m not sure everyone’s OK with news media keeping up with the latest vulgarities," AP standards editor Tom Kent writes in a post on the suddenly kind of hot topic of whether news organizations should publish profanity. "For instance, if our stories were as laced with things 'sucking' as common speech is, readers might find it very tedious very fast." AP now prints "damn" and "hell" without occasioning any pearl-clutching, Kent notes. And it will usually hyphenate or bleep newsworthy profanity, like when Vice President Biden called the health-care law "a big fucking deal" (a word Kent reproduces in all its glory). So why worry so much, AP?
We believe most AP subscribers — web and mobile news sites, broadcasters and newspapers — still want certain obscenities obscured. It’s also our own opinion that loading up our services with gratuitous obscenities cheapens our work and is of service to no one.
A "newspaper’s job is not to report tasteful news," The Economist's language blog, Johnson, writes in a call for The New York Times to loosen its standards.
True slurs, such as those concerning race, sex and disability, can sear the victim. Yet reporting on the damage done no more repeats the damage than publishing a photograph of a victim of physical harm repeats that harm. It’s called journalism, and it is the New York Times’s sole reason for existence.
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The Economist with a lovely correction to a mistaken claim about its own coverage of the legalization of drugs:

In a leader last month (Of bongs and bureaucrats, January 11th) we said that The Economist first proposed legalising drugs in 1993. In fact we argued for it in a cover story in 1988. Who says drug use doesn’t damage long-term memory?

Hat tip to Emily Babay.

The Economist

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Figure skating: the best Olympic sport to illustrate anxiety

The Sochi Winter Games start in a week amid fraught circumstances, from concerns about Russia's anti-"gay propaganda" law to concerns about security to concerns about press freedom.

And what better sport to convey the anxiety surrounding Sochi than figure skating? Its popularity may have declined in recent years, but as a vessel for illustrating these games' ability to evoke beauty and unease simultaneously, it remains without peer.
For The Economist, Putin on ice represents "A skater with feet of clay."
(more...)
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Why The Economist turned over digital strategy to its tablet chief

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The Economist has elevated Oscar Grut, head of its tablet editions, to a new position overseeing the website and all other digital products as well. “It is a sign," Robert Andrews reports, "that after years of struggling to make money and native products on the web, publishers increasingly view digital editions -- familiar reversioning of their core legacy titles -- as their primary digital products.” || Related: Why The Weather Channel separates tablet & mobile ad sales: "We just see so much more value in the tablet” (Digiday) || Earlier: Economist CEO foresees rapid audience shift from print to tablet (Poynter)
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In “The value of a good editor” (January 7th), we unwittingly proved the point of the title by referring to Joshua Rosenthal of the University of Puerto Rico subsequently as “Ms Rosenthal”. The gender-identifying appellation had been intended for his colleague, Sandra Garrett. Apologies to both.

An apology from The Economist

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Economist CEO foresees rapid audience shift from print to tablet

Guardian
Andrew Rashbass tells Roy Greenslade that U.S. readers of The Economist expect to largely abandon the print product in the next two years, moving quickly to tablets. Greenslade reports:
The Economist's own research reveals that 28% of its readers already own a tablet, with a further 23% expecting to own one within a year. A survey of the Economist's US subscribers asked those aged over 40 how they read the Economist – more than 95% said they read it in print. But when asked how they expect to read it in two years' time, the number expecting to do so in print fell to 35%. "I've never seen a statistic like it," Rashbass said.
Related: Joshua Benton at Nieman Lab points out a problem for news organizations trying to plan investments in e-books and Kindle editions: Amazon never discloses how many e-readers it has sold. "If sales numbers really are impressive," he challenges Amazon, "shout them from the rooftops!"
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Oops! The Economist discovers it’s been giving away digital subscriptions

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The Economist is revoking premium digital subscriptions from some users after realizing it's been accidentally giving them full digital access -- for five years, in some cases. The magazine, which charges $110 a year for the digital-only subscription, tells freeloaders: “Unfortunately, we have been providing you with full digital access in error. Our system will be updated to correct this error on October 25th 2011. After that time, your full digital access will only continue if you choose to subscribe. ....We hope that you have enjoyed full digital access to The Economist. It would be our pleasure to welcome you as a subscriber in the near future."
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