Articles about "The Guardian"


Michael Wolff no longer writes for the Guardian

Capital | CJR
The Guardian has discontinued Michael Wolff's media column, Joe Pompeo reports.
"It has been a longstanding and productive relationship for which we are grateful," a Guardian U.S. spokesperson told Capital in a statement. "It's always been interesting, never dull and more often exciting. We wish him the best of luck."

Asked if there was any specific reason for the split, the spokesperson would only say: "It's time to go our separate ways."
Wolff's hasn't written for The Guardian since late March. Last week, CJR's Ryan Chittum wrote about Wolff's columns, noting he is the founder of Newser, a news aggregator that competes with some of the companies he covers. Wolff also writes a column about media for USA Today.

The Guardian didn't answer Chittum's queries about Wolff, but USA Today Editor-in-Chief David Callaway did: “I’ll discuss with him and his editor," Callaway wrote. "We’re happy to disclose all relationships that might appear to cause conflict."

Related: No one predicts failure like Michael Wolff
Tools:
0 Comments
Pulitzers

Gellman: Baron’s editing ‘made me feel like it was still The Washington Post I’d grown up with’

Bart Gellman is by no means done with reporting on the NSA. His stories for The Washington Post won a Public Service Pulitzer today, a prize he and collaborators, including Ashkan Soltani and Laura Poitras, shared with The Guardian for their reporting on Edward Snowden's revelations. "Look, there are more great stories to do, and I have a book to write, so I will be on this subject for time to come," Gellman said by phone.
Gellman speaks to The Washington Post newsroom after the Pulitzer announcement Monday. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
Gellman speaks to The Washington Post newsroom after the Pulitzer announcement Monday. Asked whether he'd changed his methodology in the course of reporting these stories, Gellman said "I've had to become much more careful to protect my reporting materials and my confidential sources." Whereas he used to worry about keeping stuff only from the U.S. government, "Now I have to worry about foreign intelligence services."

Gellman said he's "even more conscious than I was before about putting sources at risk." At times, he's worried about asking even "fairly innocent questions" he feared might put sources under scrutiny. "There are times I don't make the call or don't make the visit I want to make" because of such concerns, he said.

Post Executive Editor Marty Baron "did not know me from Adam when I came to him with a really high risk" story, Gellman said, saying he's "genuinely, no bullshit, immensely grateful to this paper and its leadership." Baron "made every decision with guts and good judgment," he said. "It made me feel like it was still The Washington Post I'd grown up with."

"We are enormously grateful that Bart Gellman brought this story to the Post, where he had worked for so many years," Baron said in an email to Poynter. "His experience and expertise in the realm of national security and intelligence are unequaled. That allowed him to navigate some especially sensitive and difficult terrain. Throughout this story, he showed persistence, great care, and no small measure of wisdom."
Tools:
0 Comments
This undated photo provided by Stack’s Bowers Galleries shows the first Pulitzer Prize for Public Service to ever come to auction. The 1932 Pulitzer was awarded to the now-defunct New York World-Telegram, and put up for auction in Baltimore on March 29, 2014, by the New York-based Stack’s Bowers Galleries. (AP Photo/Stack’s Bowers Galleries)

Pulitzer Preview: Snowden factor, and more on prize prospects for Monday

The Pulitzer Prize announcements shook with real-world drama last year, interrupted by reports of bombs exploding at the Boston Marathon finish line.

This coming Monday, though, expect another kind of drama: over whether blockbuster coverage of the shocking … Read more

Tools:
1 Comment

Greenwald, Poitras returning to the U.S.

The Huffington Post
Journalists Glenn Greenwald and Laura Poitras will return to the country on Friday, Michael Calderone reported Thursday in The Huffington Post.
Greenwald and Poitras, currently in Berlin, will attend Friday’s Polk Awards ceremony in New York City. The two journalists are sharing the prestigious journalism award with The Guardian’s Ewen MacAskill and with Barton Gellman, who has led The Washington Post’s reporting on the NSA documents. Greenwald and Poitras interviewed Snowden last June in Hong Kong as he first revealed himself. In an interview with The Huffington Post, Greenwald said he’s motivated to return because “certain factions in the U.S. government have deliberately intensified the threatening climate for journalists.”
(more...)
Tools:
0 Comments

Guardian staffers win top IRE prize for NSA series

IRE
The Investigative Reporters & Editors medal for 2014 goes to Glenn Greenwald, Laura Poitras, Ewen MacAskill and others for the Guardian's reports on the NSA, which "revealed a story that continues to reverberate in the United States and across the globe," the judges say. (Greenwald and Poitras now work for Pierre Omidyar's First Look Media.)

ProPublica got a FOI Award for its series on revelations from government drug data.

In broadcast, New Orleans' WVUE won for its "Body of Evidence" series, Los Angeles' KNBC won for an investigation into bus safety and CNN and the Center for Investigative Reporting won for their series on fraud at rehab clinics.

Swedish Radio beat stories by NPR, CIR and Minnesota Public Radio with a story that sounds like the plot of a Stieg Larsson novel but is, shockingly, true.
“The Girl Who Got Tied Down” is all too real: Sexually abused by her own father, only to face rape while in foster care by others. Her attackers included a senior police official who publicly proclaimed he was a “feminist.” The police chief was ultimately exposed and prosecuted in a high profile arrest. The story also focuses on a senior psychiatrist who personally profits from abandoning the girl. Drawing from the girl’s own recordings -- including confrontations with staff who have ignored and neglected her -- Daniel Velasco and Swedish Radio weave together a riveting story, powerful and revelatory. After the documentary aired, the psychiatrist was fired and his company lost its contract. But more important, the documentary commanded public attention to the plight of all children lost in a harsh system.
Tools:
0 Comments
Happy april fools' day stamp

Hoax earthquake letter rings in April Fools’ Day

Los Angeles Times | The Guardian | BBC No, California, the U.S. Geological Survey is not warning people that a large quake is on its way. It's early yet in the U.S., but by now, April Fools' jokes are pretty much all played out in the UK. The Guardian collected the best jokes of the day, including their own, reporting that Scotland might switch to driving on the right, (which I did see on my Twitter feed this morning and remember thinking, hmmm, wonder how that's gonna work.)
"It sends out an explicit signal: we are part of Europe," said one of the brains behind the scheme. "The little Englanders who want out of Europe are the only ones driving on the left-hand side. We've been the smaller relative dominated and having to copy their ridiculous ways for too long. No more. Just think, this will be an indignity for little England – isolated in Europe and pootling along in the slow lane on the left," he added. They are concerned, however, that opponents of the move to the right might mobilise under the emotive slogan: "Proud to be left." Some fear that when the plans go public, the charismatic MP George Galloway would not be prepared to stand on the sidelines but would launch his own appeal: "Stay left, hard left."
The BBC took the day to remember their best April Fools' prank ever -- the annual spaghetti harvest. (more...)
Tools:
1 Comment

This year, Society for News Design competition sees the legacy of ‘Snow Fall’

Society for News Design NPR's "Planet Money Makes a T-Shirt" and The Guardian's "NSA Files: Decoded" won gold medals from the Society for News Design's Best of Digital Design competition. Only two golds were awarded this year. Last year, five golds were awarded, said Ryan Sparrow, co-director of the Best of Digital Design competition and a journalism professor at Ball State University. "We see a gold medal as a piece that defines the state of things," Sparrow wrote in an e-mail to Poynter. "It pushes the visual and technical boundaries so much that it shows us a path for the rest of the industry to follow." (more...)
Tools:
0 Comments

Guardian editor wins European Press Prize for NSA coverage

The Guardian
The Guardian's editor-in-chief, Alan Rusbridger, poses in a photo with a mangled piece of metal alongside a story Monday announcing his European Press Prize for leading a team of reporters on their NSA coverage.

What he's holding isn't the award, though, but one of the mangled hard drives containing National Security Agency files that Rusbridger and staff at The Guardian destroyed last year under government orders.

The Guardian was given "The Special Award" by judges at the European Press Prize – Europe's equivalent of the Pulitzers – at a ceremony in London which brought together leading journalists, editors and commentators from across the continent. Announcing the award, BBC Today presenter Justin Webb said Snowden had been "the biggest global story of the year". The series of revelations about the extent of state surveillance had "set alarm bells ringing throughout the world."


While accepting the award, The Guardian reported, Rusbridger spoke about destroying those hard drives. (more...)
Tools:
0 Comments

Robot reporters? The Guardian gives it a go

The Guardian
On Sunday, Leila Haddou and Will Franklin reported in The Guardian that the news site created their own robot reporter.

There is a logic at work here, though. The mundane task of trawling through wire copy to spot a newsworthy item could be seen as a waste of resources, especially if all that's required is straight reportage of facts and figures. Surely we should just let computers do the work, while humans get on with more investigative and analytical pieces?


GUARBOT 1.0 went down like this.

We thought quinoa would be a suitable topic, and the program was tasked with trawling through a Guardian database for relevant terms from articles on the same subject. Then it was a matter of feeding a set of rules into the program to build a structure for the article. Here's what we got back: The crime-ridden family of quinoa has taken US by storm this month. According to Peru, New York has confirmed that quinoa is more story than anything else they've ever seen. Quotes from top Yotam Ottolenghi eaters suggest that "crop" is currently clear top, possibly more than ground black pepper. Experts say both Salt and University need to traditionally grow to strengthen a common solution. Finally, it is worth slightly rattling that this article was peeled until it made sense.
(more...)
Tools:
0 Comments

The Guardian looks back on a year translating English to English

The Guardian
The Guardian launched its "English to English" Tumblr nearly a year ago, and Katie Rogers says its staff has learned a few things about navigating the language divide in a transatlantic newsroom.
The first is that any serious cultural or linguistic differences we may have are best solved by poking a healthy bit of fun at each other. The second is that a lot can change in a year. The formerly endless comment streams debating whether or not two forms of spellings can appear on one website have certainly abated, which allows readers to get away from our differences to better discuss the story at hand.
Last year Guardian readers editor Chris Elliott wrote about "the apparently relentless march of phrases from the other side of the pond." Elliott said his office is "no longer able to keep statistics about the kind of issues raised, because the volume of complaints and queries has grown in tandem with the Guardian's online readership."

Reached by email, Rogers said she and "English to English" co-creator Erin McCann want to do more with the project.
It's allowed the Guardian US to establish a large, engaged community on Tumblr, but it has also allowed us to meet some of our readers in person. We hosted a meetup in New York last fall and we're planning another one this spring. Aside from expanding plans to do more work with the community we already have, we want to look for more opportunities to tie more of our 'translations' and features into traditional Guardian coverage on-site. The style guide post is one example of this, but we think topics like food, sport and television have serious potential.
"We're pleased that our colleagues in London in Australia are also fans, and we're hoping to balance out American voices with more global writers," McCann wrote in an email.
Of course they brought a picnic. (Wallace and Gromit GIF via filmic LIFE)
Tools:
0 Comments