Articles about "The Guardian"


Edward Snowden is designing tools for journalists

The Guardian

Edward Snowden is using some of his time in Russia to design “encryption tools to help professionals such as journalists protect sources and data,” Alan Rusbridger and Ewen MacAskill write in The Guardian. They interviewed the NSA whistleblower in Moscow.

Snowden is “negotiating foundation funding for the project,” they write.

“Journalists have to be particularly conscious about any sort of network signalling, any sort of connection, any sort of licence-plate reading device that they pass on their way to a meeting point, any place they use their credit card, any place they take their phone, any email contact they have with the source because that very first contact, before encrypted communications are established, is enough to give it all away,” Snowden told them.… Read more

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Obama administration knew in advance about destruction of Guardian’s hard drives

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories. Want more roundups? We got ‘em! From Sam Kirkland: “Why are so many news organizations still worried about retweets by staffers?” From Kristen Hare: “Chinese journalists get a warning; press freedoms halt in South Sudan.”

  1. Obama administration knew British government planned to force Guardian to destroy hard drives with Snowden docs: AP scores emails with a FOIA request. “‘Good news, at least on this front,’ the current NSA deputy director, Richard Ledgett, said at the end of a short, censored email to then-NSA director Gen. Keith Alexander and others. The subject of that July 19, 2013, email was: ‘Guardian data being destroyed.’” (AP) | FLASHBACK: Video of Guardian editors destroying hard drives while technicians from the Brtitish intelligence agency Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) watched.
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Cuba may have planted a story in The Daily Caller, WSJ turns 125

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories. From Kristen Hare, world media news. From Sam Kirkland, your digital day.

  1. Did Cuba plant a story in The Daily Caller? The CIA has “credible evidence” that Matthew Boyle‘s November 2012 Daily Caller story “Women: Sen. Bob Menendez paid us for sex in the Dominican Republic” may have been part of a Cuban plot to smear Menendez, a Castro critic. (The Washington Post) | Daily Caller EIC Tucker Carlson: “we’re making calls right now to see what we can dig up.” (Business Insider) | In February 2013, Erik Wemple looked at how Boyle’s story spread from The Daily Caller to mainstream outlets. (The Washington Post) | Alex Seitz-Wald in November 2012: “My conspiracy theory: @mboyle1′s source is Cuban Intelligence.” (@aseitzwald)
  2. Guardian releases financial results: Digital revenue was up 24 percent in a fiscal year that ended in March, print revenue was flat and total revenue was up about 7 percent.
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Google removes Guardian, BBC search results; Facebook drives 25% of Hearst’s traffic

— Google has notified The Guardian and BBC that certain articles will no longer appear in European searches, Mark Scott writes at The New York Times Bits blog. A European court ruling allows people “to ask for links to information about themselves to be removed from search results.”

— As news organizations fail to take advantage of the surge in mobile ad spending, Poynter’s Rick Edmonds says his hunch “is that getting video right and getting stronger mobile ad performance will go hand in hand for news sites.”

— Facebook drives 25 percent of traffic to Hearst magazines, up from 4 percent last year. Lucia Moses explains the publisher’s new focus on Facebook at Digiday.

— Vice Media will move to a larger Brooklyn headquarters, Laura Kusisto reports in The Wall Street Journal.… Read more

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Vanity Fair: Baquet’s ‘ultimatum of sorts’ led to Abramson ouster

Vanity Fair

New York Times Co. CEO Mark Thompson, Times Publisher Arthur Sulzberger Jr and then Executive Editor Jill Abramson were all “actively recruiting” Guardian U.S. Editor-in-Chief Janine Gibson to a top digital role, Sulzberger says in an interview with Sarah Ellison in Vanity Fair.

Sulzberger calls the events around that hire “the wave.” Dean Baquet, then the newspaper’s managing editor, didn’t know Gibson “was being recruited for a job equal to his own,” she writes. At a lunch, “When Janine told Dean that she’d been offered the job of co-managing editor, he didn’t have a clue,” Sulzberger told Elllison. The story continues:

Baquet reportedly betrayed no irritation during his lunch with Gibson. But two days later, on Wednesday, May 7, he and Sulzberger had dinner.

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Guardian hires Aron Pilhofer from NYT

Aron Pilhofer will be The Guardian’s executive editor of digital, the Guardian announced Monday. Pilhofer was the Times’ associate managing editor for digital strategy.

The hire follows the Times’ attempts to hire Guardian U.S. Editor-in-Chief Janine Gibson to run its digital operation, a process that by some accounts played a role in Publisher Arthur Sulzberger Jr.’s decision to dismiss Jill Abramson as editor. Gibson said she declined.

Pilhofer will move to London “over the summer,” The Guardian says.

Here’s Times Executive Editor Dean Baquet’s note to staff about Pilhofer’s departure: … Read more

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In this Feb. 9, 2014 photo provided by the Missouri Department of Corrections is Russell Bucklew. The Missouri Supreme Court on Wednesday, April 8, 2014 set a May 21  execution date for convicted killer Russell Bucklew, continuing a trend of scheduling one execution per month. Bucklew was convicted in the fatal shooting of Michael Sanders, a romantic rival, then abducting and raping Bucklew's ex-girlfriend. (AP Photo/Missouri Department of Corrections)

AP, Guardian, Missouri papers sue state over secrecy regarding execution drugs

Associated Press | The Guardian | The Kansas City Star

The Associated Press and The Guardian U.S., have joined three Missouri newspapers in a lawsuit filed Thursday against the Missouri Department of Corrections, the AP reported in a media advisory.

The St. Louis (Missouri) Post-Dispatch, The Kansas City (Missouri) Star and the Springfield (Missouri) News-Leader joined the suit. In a separate suit, St. Louis Public Radio’s Chris McDaniel also filed along with the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press and the American Civil Liberties Union of Missouri, according to a story Thursday by the AP and Margaret Wolf Freivogel (who was my former boss at the St. Louis Beacon.)

Tony Rizzo wrote about the case for the Star on Thursday.

The suit, filed in Cole County Circuit Court in Jefferson City, alleges that the corrections department is violating the Missouri Sunshine Law by denying repeated requests for information about the “composition, concentration, source and quality of drugs used to execute inmates in Missouri.”

By withholding access to information that historically has been publicly available, the department also is violating the First and Fourteenth Amendments of the U.S.

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Guardian has deleted almost 500 comments from pro-Russia trolls

The Guardian

On Sunday, The Guardian’s Readers’ Editor Chris Elliott wrote about a growing problem in the comments section of stories about Ukraine — pro-Russian trolling, which one moderator told him appears to be “an orchestrated campaign.”

Trolling covers a multitude of sins but a particularly nasty strain has emerged in the midst of the armed conflict in Ukraine, which infests comment threads on the Guardian and elsewhere, despite the best efforts of moderators. Readers and reporters alike are concerned that these are from those paid to troll, and to denigrate in abusive terms anyone criticising Russia or President Vladimir Putin.

One complaint came to the readers’ editor’s office on 6 March. “In the past weeks [I] have become incredibly frustrated and disillusioned by your inability to effectively police the waves of Nashibot trolls who’ve been relentlessly posting pro-Putin propaganda in the comments on Ukraine v Russia coverage.

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Emma Gilbey Keller has resigned from The Guardian

Several months after her controversial column was removed from its website, Emma Gilbey Keller has formally resigned from The Guardian.

“I haven’t written for The Guardian by my own choice since they took my column down in January before contacting or consulting me,” Keller told Poynter in an email. “I thought long and hard about whether or not to continue working for them and eventually decided to resign, which I formally did last month.”

The Guardian confirmed Keller’s resignation.

Keller was a Guardian contributor since January 2012, hosting its lifestyle series “The Living Hour” among other duties. In January of this year, Keller wrote about the public way Lisa Bonchek Adams, who has Stage 4 breast cancer, was chronicling her experience with the disease over Twitter and on her blog.… Read more

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Michael Wolff no longer writes for the Guardian

Capital | CJR

The Guardian has discontinued Michael Wolff’s media column, Joe Pompeo reports.

“It has been a longstanding and productive relationship for which we are grateful,” a Guardian U.S. spokesperson told Capital in a statement. “It’s always been interesting, never dull and more often exciting. We wish him the best of luck.”

Asked if there was any specific reason for the split, the spokesperson would only say: “It’s time to go our separate ways.”

Wolff’s hasn’t written for The Guardian since late March. Last week, CJR’s Ryan Chittum wrote about Wolff’s columns, noting he is the founder of Newser, a news aggregator that competes with some of the companies he covers. Wolff also writes a column about media for USA Today.

The Guardian didn’t answer Chittum’s queries about Wolff, but USA Today Editor-in-Chief David Callaway did: “I’ll discuss with him and his editor,” Callaway wrote.… Read more

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