Articles about "The Star-Ledger"


A reserved sign and flowers are seen on a table at Holsten's ice cream parlor Thursday, June 20, 2013, in Bloomfield, N.J., with a newspaper announcing the death of actor James Gandolfini. Gandolfini was mourned in the northern New Jersey towns where his TV character Tony Soprano lived, loved and whacked people. The star died Wednesday night in Italy of an apparent heart attack. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)

Rutgers AD: If Star-Ledger died, ‘That’d be great’

Muckgers | The Star-Ledger

Speaking to a journalism class, Rutgers University Athletic Director Julie Hermann said “That’d be great” about the prospect of The (Newark, N.J.) Star-Ledger dying. “I’m going to do all I can to not to give them a headline to keep them alive because I think I got them through the summer,” she said.

Hermann’s remarks, reported by Simon Galperin, who was in the class, preceded last week’s layoffs at the newspaper, in which 167 people lost jobs. Galperin gave The Star-Ledger a copy of a recording of her remarks, The Star-Ledger’s Steve Politi writes, saying her remarks achieved “a perfect level of awfulness.”

In a statement from Rutgers, Hermann did not apologize or explain her attack on the newspaper, instead stating that she was sharing her experiences “in an informal way and out of the glare of the media spotlight.” Because who would have imagined that journalism students would have recording devices?

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A reserved sign and flowers are seen on a table at Holsten's ice cream parlor Thursday, June 20, 2013, in Bloomfield, N.J., with a newspaper announcing the death of actor James Gandolfini. Gandolfini was mourned in the northern New Jersey towns where his TV character Tony Soprano lived, loved and whacked people. The star died Wednesday night in Italy of an apparent heart attack. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)

Advance laid off more than 300 people in N.J.

The Star-Ledger | The New York Times | The Daily Beast | Philly.com

Some 306 people lost jobs at Advance’s New Jersey properties Thursday, Mark Mueller and Ted Sherman report in The (Newark, N.J.) Star-Ledger. At the Star-Ledger, 167 staffers, 40 of them from the newsroom, were laid off as Advance tries to reposition its newsgathering operations for digital readership.

“Another 124 full- and part-time jobs were eliminated at the company’s weekly newspapers and at the dailies in Trenton, Easton, and South Jersey,” Mueller and Sherman write. “At NJ.com, 15 of 77 employees were let go.”

Matt Kraner, the president of NJ Advance Media, the new company that will provide content and other services to the papers, told The New York Times the group “will be adding 27 editorial positions to increase the numbers of reporters and photographers on the street.” The cuts will nevertheless present “a net reduction in editorial staff,” Ravi Somaiya reports.… Read more

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James Gandolfini Reaction New Jersey_AP

Star-Ledger lays off 167

The Star-Ledger

The (Newark, N.J.) Star-Ledger will cut about 25 percent of its newsroom today, Ted Sherman and Mark Mueller report. Of the 167 cuts total at the paper, about 40 will come from the newsroom. NJ.com is also being hit.

The Advance-owned paper last week announced the creation of a new company called NJ Advance Media. Following the script set at other Advance properties, the new company will publish the Star-Ledger, NJ.com and other newspapers.

The cuts aren’t necessarily immediate, Sherman and Mueller report:

In packets that were being handed out this morning, those being told their jobs were being eliminated were offered severance packages if they agreed to stay with the newspaper until NJ Advance Media, new media company being formed, is up and running.

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Forget green, we’re still in winter white

Usually on days with unusual weather (such as snow on St. Patrick’s Day in many places,) I turn to the Newseum for a collection of front pages. But, “Due to inclement weather, the Newseum will be closed Monday, March 17,” they announced on Facebook.

“No front page uploads either?” one woman asked.

Those fronts are up now, but it looks like most newspapers in snowy places chose to focus on other things today on their fronts (and I don’t blame them. It’s March 17.)

You can peruse the pages of many publications who had to shovel out this morning, though, including The Washington Post, The (Newark, N.J.) Star-Ledger and The (Wilmington, Del.) News-Journal.

Here are some Associated Press photos that also show little green on this St.… Read more

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Correction: Christie spokesperson called guy ‘piece of excrement,’ not ‘piece of crap’

Perhaps the best correction you’ll see all day, from The (Newark, N.J.) Star-Ledger:

An earlier version of this story incorrectly stated [Chris Christie spokesperson Michael] Drewniak referred to the Port Authority’s executive director as a “piece of crap.” While Drewniak did call him a “piece of excrement,” it was David Wildstein who referred to the executive director as a “piece of crap.”

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Star-Ledger regrets Christie endorsement: ‘we blew this one’

The Star-Ledger

“An endorsement is not a love embrace,” writes Tom Moran, the editorial page editor of The (Newark, N.J.) Star-Ledger. But the Star-Ledger regrets hugging N.J. Gov. Chris Christie anyway:

But yes, we blew this one. When the endorsement ran, I could not get a cup of coffee in the People’s Republic of Montclair without my liberal friends taunting me. Back then, I pushed back.

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Advance considers consolidating operations in N.J. papers

The Star-Ledger

Advance’s New Jersey papers have some “channel conflict,” (Newark, N.J.) Star-Ledger Publisher Richard Vezza tells his paper. So while Vezza stresses that Advance is not thinking about the changes it’s implemented in other markets, like reducing print frequency or home-delivery days, he said “the company is looking at everything, from combining sales forces to how to organize its news operations,” Ted Sherman reports.

This fall, Vezza said he would consider shutting down The Star-Ledger if it couldn’t come to an accommodation with its unions.… Read more

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N.J. businessman offers to sell Star-Ledger domain names of its editors

The Star-Ledger

Al Demola, a frequent subject of The (Newark, N.J.) Star-Ledger’s consumer-protection column “Bamboozled,” called the paper with an unusual offer, Karin Price Mueller writes:

“He said he owned domains, or web addresses, in the names of some Star-Ledger editors. He requested we ask the bosses if they wanted to buy the domain names from him.” He offered to send his proposal to Mueller’s home address, “which he then named.”

Indeed, an anonymous buyer using a private domain registrar purchased the web names for the paper’s editor and publisher, records show. The sites were redirected to a pornographic web site.

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Star-Ledger publisher threatens to close paper

The Star-Ledger

Publisher Richard Vezza says he’ll shut down The (Newark, N.J.) Star-Ledger at the end of 2013 if it can’t come to an agreement with one of the four unions at the paper, Kelly Heyboer reports.

The Advance-owned paper’s newsroom isn’t a union shop, but its pressmen, engravers, machinists and mailers — who “handle the newspapers after they emerge from the presses, helping insert advertising supplements and preparing the papers to be loaded on delivery trucks” — have unions. Negotiations with all but the mailers have been fruitful:… Read more

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Laid-off Star-Ledger writer describes misery of Yankees beat

Jeff Bradley
Jeff Bradley isn’t going to miss reporting on the Yankees for the (Newark, N.J.) Star-Ledger, which laid off employees last week. He was hired as a columnist but his bosses switched him to the pinstripe beat after the previous writer left.

I was not happy. I have two teenage sons who like having a dad to make them breakfast in the morning. I have a wife who works full-time.

When I was the columnist, I’d often walk through the door after 2 a.m. after covering a game in the Bronx or Flushing. But at least I’d be home. A baseball beat writer spends about 150-170 nights per year in a hotel room between the months of February and October.

Had the Ledger been looking for a Yankee beat writer when I was on my way out at ESPN The Magazine, I would not have even filled out an application.

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