Articles about "The Wall Street Journal"


Cuba may have planted a story in The Daily Caller, WSJ turns 125

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories. From Kristen Hare, world media news. From Sam Kirkland, your digital day.

  1. Did Cuba plant a story in The Daily Caller? The CIA has “credible evidence” that Matthew Boyle‘s November 2012 Daily Caller story “Women: Sen. Bob Menendez paid us for sex in the Dominican Republic” may have been part of a Cuban plot to smear Menendez, a Castro critic. (The Washington Post) | Daily Caller EIC Tucker Carlson: “we’re making calls right now to see what we can dig up.” (Business Insider) | In February 2013, Erik Wemple looked at how Boyle’s story spread from The Daily Caller to mainstream outlets. (The Washington Post) | Alex Seitz-Wald in November 2012: “My conspiracy theory: @mboyle1′s source is Cuban Intelligence.” (@aseitzwald)
  2. Guardian releases financial results: Digital revenue was up 24 percent in a fiscal year that ended in March, print revenue was flat and total revenue was up about 7 percent.
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WSJ: Don’t ‘inflict’ courtesy titles on Justin Vivian Bond

The Wall Street Journal

The Wall Street Journal “ran a correction recently to point out that entertainer Justin Vivian Bond doesn’t identify as either male or female,” William Power and Jennifer Hicks write in a post on the Journal’s style blog. “Our article had used Mr. on second reference.”

In such cases, they write, “we will respect a subject’s views in that area by not inflicting a courtesy title.” How to handle it in copy? “In such cases, we try to avoid a pronoun or use descriptive terms on second reference such as the artist.”

Poynter’s Lauren Klinger wrote last year about ways journalists can write well about transgender people. Bond is trans. “In the future if I see or hear the words he or she, her or him, hers or his, in reference to me, I will take it either as a personal insult, a weak mind (easily forgivable), or (worst case scenario) sloppy journalism,” Bond writes.… Read more

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The day in digital: Is ‘time on site’ metric a silver bullet? Plus iWatch news

Apple is planning to offer multiple versions of its long-rumored smartwatch when it is finally released in as early as October, Eva Dou and Lorraine Luk report in the Wall Street Journal. When it comes to watches, “one design doesn’t fill all,” an analyst said.

“The page view just won’t die,” BuzzFeed’s Myles Tanzer writes. But “time on site as an end-all, be-all metric doesn’t really work at the moment,” says Chris Thorman, who does audience development at Vox Media. (Poynter’s Rick Edmonds has argued it’s time to ditch the page view and unique visitor metrics.)

The NYT-WaPo-Mozilla plan to build a better commenting/community platform won’t vanquish trolls completely. “Try as we might, I don’t think we’re going to create magic,” said Greg Barber, the Post’s director of digital news projects.… Read more

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4 Wall Street Journal Twitter accounts have been hacked

In an email to Poynter, Wall Street Journal spokesperson Colleen Schwartz says “We believe the @WSJD, @WSJEurope, @WSJAfrica, @WSJVintage Twitter accounts have been compromised,” and that the Journal is “still investigating.” (I inserted the links in the quote above.)

The Journal said on Twitter Tuesday that some of its accounts “may have been compromised.”

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WSJ’s Baker: ‘We generally avoid reporters breaking news on Twitter’

Google Docs

Wall Street Journal Managing Editor Gerard Baker spoke at City University, London, Monday, and Journal social media editor Sarah Marshall took notes. Baker went through a list of things the Journal is doing that he thinks other news orgs should do, including being “genuinely independent”: “You cannot become dependent on the companies on which you are reporting,” Marshall reports he said. “We need to be mindful of journalistic ethics and standards.”

During a Q&A someone asked whether social media is “just marketing.” No, but Marshall reports Baker said, “We generally avoid reporters breaking news on Twitter. We generally break to paying subscribers.”

Last November CNBC found that only about 16 percent of Twitter users frequently use the service to get breaking news.… Read more

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You can use Getty Images for free, sort of

The Wall Street Journal | The Verge | BBC | Nieman Lab

The “sort of” is you’re using Twitter, Tumblr or “non-commercial WordPress blogs,” Georgia Wells reported in The Wall Street Journal on Wednesday after Getty Images announced they’d make a whole lot of images available for free.

On Wednesday, the company unveiled the embed tool, which will allow users to include images on websites, such as non-commercial WordPress blogs. The eligible images also come with buttons for Tumblr and Twitter, where a link to the image can be shared. (The image itself doesn’t appear on Twitter, however.)

Poynter is a nonprofit, and we do use WordPress. But we do sell ads against our content. So I think it’s OK that I pulled this shot this morning, because, well, look at that guy.… Read more

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Tech writer Manjoo jumps to NYT after spending ‘like four seconds at the WSJ’

The New York Times

Farhad Manjoo, the former Slate tech columnist who joined the Wall Street Journal in September as Walt Mossberg and Kara Swisher were planning to take the AllThingsD crew elsewhere, will join the New York Times. He replaces David Pogue, now at Yahoo.

Manjoo took to LinkedIn to explain the departure despite the fact that his “new job at the WSJ and the colleagues I’d found myself working with were pretty much perfect.”… Read more

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The New York Times hires Michael Forsythe

The New York Times

Former Bloomberg News reporter Michael Forsythe now works for The New York Times, according to a Times story on Sunday by Christine Haughney.

Forsythe, based in Hong Kong, left Bloomberg News in November after Bloomberg held an investigative story “because of fears that Bloomberg would be expelled from China,” Haughney wrote.

After Bloomberg News published an article in June 2012 on the family wealth of Xi Jinping, at that time the incoming Communist Party chief, sales of Bloomberg terminals in China slowed, as officials ordered state enterprises not to subscribe. Officials also blocked Bloomberg’s website on Chinese servers, and the company has been unable to get residency visas for new journalists.

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Wall Street Journal and Reuters confirm China has unblocked sites

Tech In Asia

China has unblocked the Chinese-language sites of both The Wall Street Journal and Reuters, according to a story Monday by Steven Millward for Tech In Asia.

Colleen Schwartz, with corporate communications for the Wall Street Journal, confirmed via e-mail that the Journal’s site had been unblocked.

Heather Carpenter, public relations manager with Reuters, also confirmed via e-mail Monday that Reuters has been unblocked in China.

Millward reports that the WSJ was blocked in November.

The Chinese edition of Reuters went blank at around the same time. That all came amidst a global controversy over foreign reporters’ visas. Reuters’ veteran reporter Paul Mooney was one of several foreign reporters that faced being kicked out of China at the end of the year as authorities seemed not very keen on renewing their journalists’ visa.

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YouTube beats Twitter in reaching news consumers

Nieman Journalism Lab | The Wall Street Journal

YouTube reaches a greater part of the population with news at 10 percent than Twitter does with just 8 percent, according to a post by Caroline O’Donovan for Nieman Journalism Lab.

On Thursday, O’Donovan reported on a study from Pew Research, “News Use Across Social Media.” The results are mostly not surprising, she writes. But how far social media platforms reach with the general population might be.

According to Pew, YouTube reaches 51 percent of adults in the U.S., and “even though only a fifth of its users get news there, that amounts to 10% of the adult population, which puts it on par with Twitter. Twitter reaches just 16% of U.S. adults, but half (8% of U.S.… Read more

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