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The Washington Post

NEWS

Down by 3 with the game on the line? Call The Washington Post's Chuck Culpepper

Trailing by three, Clemson was driving against Alabama late in a pulsating, nerve-racking College Football Playoff championship game. Deadline for The Washington Post’s Chuck Culpepper meant filing almost immediately after the game ended. Culpepper looked at his computer, and only a couple of paragraphs stared back at him. Did he panic, knowing he had to generate an entire story on … Read More
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In Trump's America, the competition for investigative journalists is fierce

In the months since the election, America's major newsrooms have been recruiting investigative journalists with the knowledge and skills to dig into government institutions at the federal, state and local levels. The New York Times, BuzzFeed, ProPublica, The Washington Post and CNN have all posted or filled investigative reporting jobs in the days since the election, … Read More
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The New York Times and The Washington Post are at war, and everyone's winning

This weekend, New York Times Executive Editor Dean Baquet took a shot at his rival, Washington Post boss Marty Baron. During an interview at South by Southwest Sunday, an audience member asked Baquet what he thought of The Washington Post's new slogan: "Democracy Dies in Darkness." "'I love our competition with The Washington Post,' Baquet said. 'I think it's … Read More
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CNN has hired Chris Cillizza

Chris Cillizza, the whirling dervish political blogger for The Washington Post, is headed to CNN. According to Politico, which first reported the news, Cillizza will leave The Fix, the political blog he founded and become an editor at large for the cable news network. He will have "both a digital presence and an on-air role," Hadas Gold reported. "'I’ve … Read More
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Politico becomes the latest newsroom to cut down on flabby stories

The Washington Post did it. The Wall Street Journal did it. Now Politico has become the third newsroom in recent months to remind reporters to avoid unnecessarily long stories. "Some daily stories have been running longer than they need to be, so we’re asking everyone to pay closer attention to story lengths to respect our readers," read a … Read More
NEWS

How The Washington Post is using newsletters and alerts to reach readers

When readers wake up every morning, what do they check first? Probably their texts. Then, if they're feeling brave, their email inboxes. Readers are inundated with content nowadays, which puts the onus on journalists to reach them where they're actually paying attention. That's why many news organizations have begun hiring editors who deal exclusively with email and push notifications, … Read More
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Margaret Sullivan on the dark clouds and silver lining of covering President Trump

Donald Trump is a threat to press freedom and the norms of political reporting, said Washington Post media columnist Margaret Sullivan. But his presidency presents at least one upside for journalists: There's probably going to be a lot of leaks in the Trump administration. "I think that people inside agencies and government offices, many of them are people of … Read More
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With The Lily, The Washington Post is looking for new audiences in new places

The Lily was the name of the first U.S. newspaper edited by and for women, starting in 1849. But don't feel too bad if you didn't already know that. "It’s something that’s not in our journalism history books," said Kim Voss, an associate professor of journalism at the University of Central Florida. Voss, who has written about … Read More
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Washington Post's Express corrects: 'We erroneously used a male symbol instead of a female symbol'

It's not exactly "Dewey defeats Truman," but the cover of Thursday's Express, The Washington Post's free publication, is a doozy. The cover, which leads with the origins of this year's Women's March on Washington, shows people scattered into a well-known symbol. The problem? It's the wrong symbol. Mid-morning Thursday, Express tweeted an apology: … Read More
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Marty Baron on 'Spotlight,' Jeff Bezos, Donald Trump and the slow death of printed news

When Liev Schreiber visited The Washington Post for a sitdown with Executive Editor Marty Baron, the veteran newsman tried to keep it quiet. Baron hadn't told anybody the award-winning actor was there to talk with Baron before portraying him in "Spotlight." But, since it's a newspaper, word got out anyway. People streamed by Baron's office, "including a woman who went … Read More
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How The San Francisco Chronicle rebuilt its investigative team

Last year, an important visitor walked into Audrey Cooper's office with an idea. Cooper, the editor in chief of The San Francisco Chronicle, had long desired to beef up the paper's investigative reporting. Enter Jeffrey Johnson, The Chronicle's publisher, with a question. "So, that I-team you wanted to build — how much would it cost?" Cooper recalled Johnson saying. He … Read More
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How news organizations are trying to get people to talk, and listen, to each other after the election

Amanda Wills devoted much of the past year to coverage of the presidential election. So when she listened to voicemails left for CNN after Nov. 8, she expected to hear a lot of screaming from both sides. Instead, she heard perspectives she'd never encountered before, ones that taught her not just about CNN's audience, but about the country itself. "For … Read More
NEWS

At The Washington Post, Election Day coverage years in the making

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Ed O'Keefe and Elise Viebeck sat in a chilly TV studio on the 7th floor of The Washington Post. Through the glass wall behind the two reporters, people moved through the newsroom's hub. On the wall behind them, graphics of Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump stared straight ahead. O'Keefe and Viebeck looked at their computers and shifted … Read More
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The Washington Post's Marty Baron will spend Election Day waiting

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Tomorrow, The Washington Post's executive editor will vote, come into the newsroom and wait, like the rest of the country, to see who Americans choose as their next president. For all the innovations and creative ways journalists can now cover this election, the audience is still looking for something pretty basic, Marty Baron said. "I think that … Read More
NEWS

The Washington Post will use automation to help cover the election

On Election Day, journalists at The Washington Post will get an assist from their non-human counterparts. The newspaper announced Wednesday morning that it will use automation to cover 500 races. Among them: Senate, House and gubernatorial contests across the United States. The automation technology, Heliograf, was first used by The Post to cover the Rio Olympics and will be … Read More
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