Articles about "The Washington Post"


A good NYT review can cancel out a Washington Post pan

Emerging Arts Leaders DC

The “difference between bad reviews and great reviews over the course of a season is around $50,000 in revenue for Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company,” Woolly Mammoth marketing manager Steven Dawson writes.

One Washington Post critic, Peter Marks, has an outsized impact on ticket sales, Dawson writes: A mediocre Marks review will bring in 2 percent of the total revenue of a show, he found, while a rave will bring in 6 percent of total revenue.

Marks panned one show, “The Totalitarians,” which brought in 0 percent of revenue — 12 tickets, Dawson writes. But a Marks pan of another production, “Stupid Fucking Bird,” was offset by a theater-appropriate deus ex machina:

Charles Isherwood decided to come from the New York Times and review the play, which had already won multiple awards and had created quite the buzz.

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Games

Games are serious business at news organizations

Later this month, Gannett plans to debut a page on USA Today’s website with 70 free-to-play games.

The page will include brain training and arcade-style games, said John Geddes, the company’s first director of gaming, entertainment, and events.

“We feel that expanding our portfolio to include additional popular games such as solitaire, mahjong, and brain teasers is a huge opportunity to not only provide something new for that existing audience but for us to also attract waves of new users,” Geddes said.

Gannett is merely the latest media company to expand its games offerings. Several news organizations have acknowledged the increasing importance of games, whether for storytelling or diversion:

  • The Washington Post has pulled together an in-house team to develop a platform that will allow the newsroom to easily create quizzes, leaderboards and surveys, said Emilio Garcia-Ruiz, the paper’s managing editor for digital.
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Career Beat: Wired gets a new publisher

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • Kim Kelleher is now publisher of Wired. She was president of Say Media. (Condé Nast)
  • Jeremy Colfer is now head of video for The Hollywood Reporter. He was senior producer for branded content at Sundance TV. (The Hollywood Reporter)
  • Andy Bush is now senior vice president of global accounts at Time Inc. Previously, he was international publisher of Time magazine and Fortune. (Time Inc.)
  • Carly Holden is now communications director at GQ. Previously, she was a public relations manager at W. (email)
  • John Woodrow Cox is a metro enterprise reporter at The Washington Post. Previously, he was a staff writer at the Tampa Bay Times. (@JohnWoodrowCox)
  • Sasha Issenberg will join Bloomberg Politics.
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WaPo’s new publisher has ditched the BlackBerry

Fred Ryan is now an iPhone guy.

“What you may have heard is I’m so clumsy typing with my thumbs that I held on to my BlackBerry,” The Washington Post’s new publisher said in a phone call. These days, “I am purely iPhone — and, of course, Fire Phone,” he said, referring to the handset recently launched by Post owner Jeff Bezos’ other company, Amazon. (“You need to order one!” he said.)

As in previous interviews about his new job, Ryan, who previously was CEO and president of Politico and COO and president of the Allbritton Communications Company, declined to outline a specific strategy for how the Post would make money as print revenue declines and digital ad revenue fails to fill the gap. “I have not gone through the ad split or seen the specific numbers,” Ryan said.… Read more

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Career Beat: Former NFL wide receiver Donte Stallworth joins HuffPost

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • Michael Bloomberg will replace Daniel Doctoroff as chief executive officer of Bloomberg LP. Previously, Bloomberg was mayor of New York City. (New York Times)
  • Gina Sanders is now president of Condé Nast Global Development. She was president and CEO of Fairchild Fashion Media. (Condé Nast)
  • Brian Olsavsky will be chief financial officer for Amazon.com, Inc. He is the company’s vice president of finance. (Amazon)
  • Donte Stallworth is a politics fellow at The Huffington Post. Previously, he was a coaching intern with the Baltimore Ravens. Before that, he was an NFL wide receiver. (HuffPost Politics)
  • Chris Meighan is now design director of The Washington Post’s mobile initiative.
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sotloff

Government says Sotloff video is real

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Steven Sotloff video is real: National Security Council spokeswoman Caitlin Hayden says a video showing the journalist’s execution by Islamic State “is authentic.” (AP) | Sotloff “began many of his articles with personal anecdotes and sprinkled his reporting with mundane details like the precise price of bread, reminding readers that faceless forces like Syria’s civil war and Egypt’s military coup were fundamentally altering the lives of real people, in divergent but no less devastating ways.” (The Atlantic) | President Obama: “His killers try to claim that they defend the oppressed but it was Steven who traveled across the Middle East risking his life to tell the story of Muslim men and women demanding justice and dignity.” (Politico) | Time Editor Nancy Gibbs: Sotloff “gave his life so readers would have access to information from some of the most dangerous places in the world.” (Time) | “It appears from chatter on ISIS forums that the initial video release was an unintentional leak from within ISIS circles” (Vocativ)
  2. Fred Ryan meets Washington Post newsroom: The news organization’s new publisher declined to say how he got the job, said “a key for Wapo is winning the morning.” (@erikwemple) | Washington Post reporters figure out how he got the job: He told Jean Case he was interested, and she introduced him to Post owner Jeff Bezos.
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Timeline of Katharine Weymouth and The Washington Post

The Graham family connection to The Washington Post began on June 1, 1933 when Eugene Meyer, the great-grandfather of Katharine Weymouth, bought the paper at a bankruptcy sale for $825,000.

We have compiled this short timeline about Weymouth and The Post as a reminder of the most interesting chapters in the history of the Graham dynasty’s relationship with its former paper.

May 1966
Katharine Weymouth is born to Lally and Yann Weymouth. She grows up in New York City. Her mother is the eldest of four children of Katharine and Philip Graham.

1968
Benjamin Bradlee is named executive editor of The Post.

June 15, 1971
The Washington Post Company goes public with the sale of common stock.

June 18, 1971
The newspaper starts publishing the Pentagon Papers.… Read more

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Screen Shot 2014-09-02 at 11.27.44 AM

Katharine Weymouth at Poynter in 2010: ‘You just keep plugging away’

In 2010, Washington Post Publisher Katharine Weymouth (who announced Tuesday that she’s leaving the paper) appeared at the Poynter Institute for a discussion about the book “The Edge of Change: Women in the 21st Century Press.” Weymouth spoke with audience members and Karen Dunlap, then Poynter’s president, about her role and digital changes at the Post.

Here’s a link to C-Span’s coverage of the talk.

And here are five things Weymouth said during her visit to Poynter.

1. There’s no magic bullet for the news industry:

“It’s scary from the business perspective, how do you sustain quality journalism? But the demand for news and the ability to get news is greater than ever… People write about and talk a lot about the decline of circulation of newspapers and oh my God, what’s happening?… Read more

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Washington Post editorial board will no longer use the term ‘Redskins’

The Washington Post

The Washington Post’s editorial board announced Friday it will no longer use the term “Redskins” to describe the D.C. football team. “[W]hile we wait for the National Football League to catch up with thoughtful opinion and common decency, we have decided that, except when it is essential for clarity or effect, we will no longer use the slur ourselves,” the board writes.

The change won’t affect the newsroom, the board writes: “Unlike our colleagues who cover sports and other news, we on the editorial board have the luxury of writing about the world as we would like it to be. Nor do we intend to impose our policy on our readers. If you write a letter about football and want to use the team name, we aren’t going to stop you.”

Post Executive Editor Marty Baron told the Post’s Annys Shin that “Standard operating policy in the newsroom has been to use the names that established institutions choose for themselves.… Read more

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washington post

Inside The Washington Post’s makeshift Ferguson newsroom

Guests with cocktails and coffee sit in the dim lobby of the Marriott St. Louis Airport Hotel late on Thursday afternoon. A man tunes his guitar near the check-in desk. Men in khakis and polos roll their carry-on luggage out to the waiting shuttle.

There’s also a newsroom here, on the third floor, even though it’s really a conference room with a long table lined with chairs. On that long table sits an open chocolate bar, empty water bottles, a pack of notebooks, open laptops, tangled cords and a gas mask.

See? Newsroom.

From left, Kimberly Kindy, Chico Harlan, Lee Powell, Wesley Lowery and Krissah Thompson work from a makeshift hotel newsroom in St. Louis. (Photo by Kristen Hare)

Around the table today sit Krissah Thompson, Chico Harlan, Kimberly Kindy, Lee Powell and Wesley Lowery.… Read more

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