Articles about "The Washington Post"


Don’t post your passwords in Washington Post comments section

The Washington Post
"I couldn't give a flying fig about the Heartbleed thingamajig," a commenter posted on a Brian Fung story in The Washington Post. He posted his passwords and welcomed others to:
read all the eMail I have. Sneak into my WaPo, NYT or CNN accounts and go crazy making comments in my name. Break-into my Facebook or Twitter profiles and change my hometown to Gas City Indiana, swap-out my avatar with a picture of your nads, make friends with people I don't know.
Guess what happened next.

"It's possible that this is a hoax," Fung allows. (Fung couldn't get in touch with the person, and he tells Poynter in an email that the Post removed his comment.) "But the lesson is no less valid: Share your credentials online, and you won't have to worry about getting hacked — you'll have done all the hard work for the criminals."
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Eli Saslow thanks his sources for their ‘huge act of courage’

The Washington Post
Speaking to The Washington Post newsroom after he won a Pulitzer Prize for explanatory reporting Monday, reporter Eli Saslow said that a friend had told him, "Oh Pulitzer Prize winner, now I know the first three words of your obituary."

Saslow saluted colleagues, editors and the Post itself. Referring to former owner Don Graham, Saslow said he's excited about its new ownership but is "so, so grateful that if I was ever going to get lucky enough to win one of these things that some of the stories were published when it was Don's paper." Saslow also talked about the people "I owe the most to": His sources.
They're the ones who take the huge risk. It's a huge act of courage to have somebody call, who you don't know, from out of town, and say that they want to come be with you constantly in sort of, you know, every corner of your life in this moment where things are usually not going well and there's a lot at stake. That's an incredible thing to ask of people, and yet they say yes, and I wonder a lot about that because I'm not sure I'd be the person who said yes. And I think it's because people are so -- they really crave to be understood and they want to know that what they're dealing with matters. And I think our journalism should validate that and it should take good care of the trust they're giving us to come into their lives.
He likened the prize to the experience of having a nice sandwich after reporting on a family without food security.

"In some ways this moment is a little bit like eating a sandwich," he said. "It's like, it's great. It feels really, really good. I hope some of the attention goes to the people who are letting us into their lives." Related: Saslow's author page at the Post.
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Pulitzers

Gellman: Baron’s editing ‘made me feel like it was still The Washington Post I’d grown up with’

Bart Gellman is by no means done with reporting on the NSA. His stories for The Washington Post won a Public Service Pulitzer today, a prize he and collaborators, including Ashkan Soltani and Laura Poitras, shared with The Guardian for their reporting on Edward Snowden's revelations. "Look, there are more great stories to do, and I have a book to write, so I will be on this subject for time to come," Gellman said by phone.
Gellman speaks to The Washington Post newsroom after the Pulitzer announcement Monday. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
Gellman speaks to The Washington Post newsroom after the Pulitzer announcement Monday. Asked whether he'd changed his methodology in the course of reporting these stories, Gellman said "I've had to become much more careful to protect my reporting materials and my confidential sources." Whereas he used to worry about keeping stuff only from the U.S. government, "Now I have to worry about foreign intelligence services."

Gellman said he's "even more conscious than I was before about putting sources at risk." At times, he's worried about asking even "fairly innocent questions" he feared might put sources under scrutiny. "There are times I don't make the call or don't make the visit I want to make" because of such concerns, he said.

Post Executive Editor Marty Baron "did not know me from Adam when I came to him with a really high risk" story, Gellman said, saying he's "genuinely, no bullshit, immensely grateful to this paper and its leadership." Baron "made every decision with guts and good judgment," he said. "It made me feel like it was still The Washington Post I'd grown up with."

"We are enormously grateful that Bart Gellman brought this story to the Post, where he had worked for so many years," Baron said in an email to Poynter. "His experience and expertise in the realm of national security and intelligence are unequaled. That allowed him to navigate some especially sensitive and difficult terrain. Throughout this story, he showed persistence, great care, and no small measure of wisdom."
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Washington Post shuts down ServiceAlley

ServiceAlley, a Washington Post site that provided directories and reviews of tradespeople and home services, will shut down April 18, and its apps will go dark this weekend. An email went out to ServiceAlley customers advising them to print out deals they'd purchased through the site:
These vouchers are agreements with the merchant, so the merchant is obligated to honor the voucher until the expiration date on the voucher. After that point, the merchant is obligated to honor the purchase value of the voucher for up to 5 years from the purchase date.
The Post launched ServiceAlley in 2011, calling it "something Washingtonians need." "Service Alley was a great product, but ultimately we decided to focus on initiatives with the potential for greater scale," Post spokesperson Kris Coratti tells Poynter in an email.
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Washington Post’s possible new HQ has a Dan Brown connection

The Washington Post signed a letter of intent to move to new headquarters, Jonathan O'Connell reported on Twitter Tuesday:  

The building is on D.C.'s Franklin Square, which figures prominently in Dan Brown's 2009 novel "The Lost Symbol." (The Almas Shriners are based there, too.) I purchased a copy of the book to see if any startling connections exist between the Post's potential new home and the shadowy world symbologist Robert Langdon and CIA Office of Security Director Inoue Sato investigate in the novel. Chapter 90:
Langdon shook his head. He knew Franklin Square was one of the older sections of Washington, but he wasn’t familiar with the address. He looked at the tip of the capstone, and read downward, taking in the entire text. The secret hides within The Order Eight Franklin Square
Chapter 97: (more...)
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Emily Steel writes about the Washington Post’s innovations under new owner Jeff Bezos:

A visit to Cory Haik’s office offers a glimpse of what the future may bring for news outlets. The Washington Post’s executive producer and senior editor for digital news is in the midst of creating prototypes for technology such as Google Glass (right). Other innovations relate to publishing Washington Post content on platforms such as the Snapchat ephemeral messaging service and the Secret app on smartwatches.

Ms Haik holds out her wrist to show off the latest experiment. She scrolls through Washington Post articles on her Samsung smartwatch, selects a story and her iPhone – which is connected to her smartwatch – reads the text of the story aloud.

Emily Steel, Financial Times

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‘Weiner!’ column debuts as the sidebar to his life

Business Insider | The Washington Post
Anthony Weiner made his Business Insider columnist debut Friday morning with "Weiner!"
You might be surprised to see me launch this column by defending a conservative like Gov. Chris Christie, but when it comes to his administration’s beef with Tesla Motors, I think he might be getting a bad rap.
(I personally have a journalism pet peeve about the phrase "when it comes to" because when does it ever come to? But that's another story, I suppose.)

On Thursday, Richard Leiby wrote for The Washington Post about Weiner's column and the politically-disgraced who've come before him. They may go on "Dancing With the Stars" or take up lobbying, or they could write for a living. (more...)
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That time Jeff Bezos did a Taco Bell commercial

Jeff Bezos was interested in mobile technology long before he owned The Washington Post, according to a 2001 Taco Bell commercial zipping around social media Thursday.

"PDAs, handhelds, I've seen these -- what do we have that's new?" the Amazon founder asks during a "meeting," before he's introduced to the new Taco Bell Chicken Quesadilla. "Interesting!" Bezos says. "Can I get a demo?"

The fun begins at the 6:41 mark: (Via Margarita Noriega)
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Local reporting is suffering from a ‘gradual erosion’

The Washington Post | Association of Alternative Newsmedia
Local reporting is suffering from a "gradual erosion," Paul Farhi writes in a piece bouncing off Pew's new State of the News Media report. The economics of digital publishing are especially brutal to local news, Farhi writes:
In drawing readers and viewers from a relatively small pond, local news outlets struggle to attract enough traffic to generate ad dollars sufficient to support the cost of gathering the news in the first place. Conversely, sites that report and comment on national and international events draw from a worldwide audience, making it relatively easier to aggregate a large audience and the ad dollars that come with it.
Publishers that cover national and international news account for 60 percent of new jobs in digital publishing, Farhi writes, while newspapers continue to cut jobs, usually from their local staffs. Small operations and nonprofits can fill the gap -- Scott Brodbeck's Local News Now in the Washington, D.C., area, employs three journalists and sales director and is profitable -- but many are "financially precarious." And, of course, there's the Patch saga.

But you don't have to go back to Watergate, or even 2012, to find examples of local stories piercing the veil that separates them from national news. The Bergen Record pushed "Bridgegate" into the lights after a traffic reporter, John Cichowski, and a reporter who covers the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, Shawn Boburg, connected the dots on an epic traffic jam in Fort Lee, N.J. Gov. Bob McDonnell of Virginia was touted as a possible 2016 presidential candidate (and reportedly made Mitt Romney's shortlist for veep) before Washington Post reporters unreeled the story of his ties to a wealthy donor. And West Virginia reporters rode point on the story of a chemical spill that affected 300,000 people's drinking water.

Unfortunately, local news lacks the cachet of long-form or investigative journalism, both of which successful digital operations like BuzzFeed and The Huffington Post have been able to subsidize as part of their overall bundles. The latter has "always been high-cost content that produced a very low — if any — return in increased circulation and advertising revenue," Jack Shafer wrote in February in a column about the "new Medicis" funding journalism as a public good -- Pierre Omidyar, Farhi's boss Jeff Bezos, Neil Barsky of the Marshall Project (which just announced the hire of The Guardian's Gabriel Dance). (more...)
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NAA’s new chairman says newspaper biz should have collaborated sooner

NetNewsCheck | NAA | Financial Times
At the Newspaper Association of America's mediaXchange conference Tuesday, Robert Dickey, the president of Gannett's U.S. Community Publishing division, said U.S. papers should have collaborated more before the meteor hit:
As they looked forward, the publishers also took a step back when asked what advice they would've offered to their predecessors in the industry 15 years ago.

"At the time when we had the cash flow, we should have been much more aggressive about a product development mentality around digital," Dickey says, noting he would've begged for more collaboration across the industry.

"If you look at what we're competing against, had the industry gotten together those ideas should've been ours," he says.
NAA announced Monday that Dickey had been elected its chairman. Washington Post executive Stephen Hills was also elected to a spot on the board. In a neat bit of symmetry, Hills yesterday spoke with Financial Times reporter Emily Steel about the Post's new partnership program with other publishers, which gives subscribers to other newspapers access to the Post's website and app.

New Post owner Jeff Bezos "is asking the question of: ‘What can you do to have a great digital audience 10 years, 20 years from now?’” Hills told Steel. “Under previous ownership, the very reasonable question we were asking was: ‘How do we make money in the next two to three years?’"
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