Articles about "The Washington Post"


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Here are 37 great journalism internships and fellowships for application season

For journalism students, October through January is internship application season, a pressure cooker of equal parts excitement and anxiety.

It’s our profession’s draft day. By mid-march, most of your classmates will have declared their intention to work at a journalism organization, like a prized NFL recruit putting on their team’s hat in front of a live studio audience.

Don’t get left behind. Some of the applications for the most prestigious news organizations are due in a few weeks time, so work up the courage to request that letter of recommendation, update your résumé and figure out how stamps work.

To make the process a little easier, I’ve compiled a list of some of the best journalism internships I could find on the Web, many of which I applied for myself when I was in school. If you have questions about this list or know some great internships I’ve forgotten, tweet them to #POYinternlist or send me an email: bmullin@poynter.org.

The New York Times James Reston Reporting Fellowship
Deadline: Oct. 31
Location: New York City
Pay: $1,000 per week
Description: “Beginning with the second week, the Reston Fellows start work in a section that reflects their skills and area of interest to report and write stories under the guidance of editors or senior reporters. Some stories are assigned, but fellows are encouraged to come up with their own ideas. They also participate in workshops with ranking editors and reporters. The goal of the program is to provide an opportunity for the fellows to stretch their journalistic skills with the help of some of the best reporters and editors in the country.”

The Washington Post
Deadline: Nov. 7
Location: Washington, D.C.
Pay: $750 per week
Description: “Our interns write articles, edit copy, take photographs, design pages and produce graphics. We treat them as staff members during their 12 weeks of employment.”

The Boston Globe
Deadline: Nov. 1
Location: Boston
Pay: $700 per week
Description: “Summer interns work as full-time employees for 12 weeks, between Memorial Day and Labor Day. Interns are paid a weekly wage, and shifts vary. An intern supervisor serves as a writing coach and there are weekly meetings with editors and staff members on a range of issues and topics pertaining to journalism.”

Associated Press Global News Internship
Deadline: Not settled yet; likely the first week of January, per AP spokesman Paul Colford.
Location: Major cities throughout the world
Pay: Not listed
Description: “The summer 2014 Global News Internship is a paid, highly selective, 12-week individually tailored training program for students who are aspiring cross-format journalists. Interns must have experience and/or training in video and one other format. They will contribute to AP’s text, video, photo and interactive reporting.”

Reuters Global Journalism Internships
Deadline: Dec. 1
Location: Major cities throughout the world
Pay: Not listed
Description: “The Reuters Global Journalism Internships offer talented students and graduates an opportunity to learn and shine in our bureaus internationally. The paid internships are a crash course in hands-on business, political and general news reporting. Every intern will report to a senior editor and be assigned a journalist mentor to provide advice and guidance during the summer. They’re expected to write regularly and deliver in-depth stories during their assignment. Interns will receive several days of formal training before they start work, focused on writing skills, journalism ethics and basic financial knowledge. They may also be able to take advantage of other, regularly scheduled training opportunities during the summer, depending on where they’re based.”

Texas Tribune News Apps Internships
Deadline: Nov. 15
Location: Austin, Texas
Pay: $5,000 over 10 weeks
Description: “Are you a journalism student or would-be reporter in another major? Know a little bit about HTML, CSS, JavaScript, and/or Python/Django, and would like to continue to hone your skills? Are you passionate about politics, policy and open government? You should join us. You’ll work directly with news apps developers, reporters and editors in the newsroom. Interns are first-class citizens on our team – in the past, they’ve had the opportunity to not only contribute to high-profile projects but to take the lead on them. You’ll get to create data visualizations and maps, participate in an active and friendly newsroom, play a role in editorial meetings and contribute to a number of different beats. We’re looking for someone passionate about web standards and the little details. Someone willing to show their work. Someone looking to learn. If you’re interested, send your resume and links to previous projects and/or your GitHub account to rmurphy@texastribune.org.”

Texas Tribune reporting internship
Deadline: Nov. 15
Location: Austin, Texas
Pay: $2,000 over 10 weeks
Description: The Texas Tribune internship program provides aspiring journalists the opportunity to hone their reporting skills and learn a host of new ones that will prepare them for the 21st century newsroom. “This is not a teaching hospital,” in the words of our fearless leader, CEO and Editor-in-Chief Evan Smith. We expect interns who are anxious to dive into daily news coverage alongside our seasoned reporting staff. Interns at the Tribune write stories and blog posts, shoot photos and video, develop news apps and assist with our major data projects. Intern work has appeared in Texas editions of The New York Times through our partnership with the most prestigious newspaper in the country.

Reuters Journalism Program
Deadline: Dec. 15
Location: New York, London or Asia
Pay: Not listed
Description: “The Reuters Journalism Program offers nine months of hands-on, real-world experience with competitive pay in New York, London and Asia. You will gain a deep grounding in all aspects of financial reporting, work on fast-paced news stories and develop skills in enterprise journalism. The program seeks rising reporters, recent graduates or business professionals who can demonstrate a clear commitment to a career in journalism and an ability to generate story ideas relevant for a Reuters audience.”

The Los Angeles Times
Deadline: Jan. 1
Location: Los Angeles, Washington D.C.
Pay: $700 per week
Description: “Interested in working with some of the best journalists around? We offer 10 weeks of intensive, hands-on experience in a region where big stories are the norm. We place interns throughout the L.A. Times: Metro/Local, Sports, Business, Features (Home, Image, Travel, Food, Mind & Body), Arts & Entertainment, Editorial Pages, Washington, D.C., bureau, Photography/Video, Data Desk, Visualization & Graphics, Design and latimes.com. These are paid internships and summer placements usually run from mid-June to late August.”

The Tampa Bay Times
Deadline: Nov. 1
Location: St. Petersburg, Tampa, Clearwater, Port Richey and Brooksville
Pay: $450 per week
Description: “Florida’s largest and best newspaper, with 10 Pulitzer Prizes, is looking for energetic, talented young people for internships in all of its departments. Internships range from 12-week summer experiences to 6-month and 1-year jobs. You will be considered a full staff member and work alongside colleagues who will serve as mentors. Our internship programs are designed to give you hands-on experience to add to your academic credentials.

The South Florida Sun Sentinel
Deadline: Nov. 15
Location: Fort Lauderdale
Pay: $7.93 per hour
Description: “We offer seven paid internships throughout our digital-print newsroom. For 11 intensive weeks, from June to mid-August, you will report and write stories, shoot and edit video-photo, or design. We treat our interns as regular staffers, under the guidance of seasoned journalists. We offer internships in various newsroom departments: Metro-news, business, features, sports, video-photo, design, and our Spanish-language weekly, El Sentinel. We also offer weekly sessions with veteran journalists and senior editors on a wide range of topics, including career advice. It’s hard work and great fun.”

Google Journalism Fellowship
Deadline: Around the end of January
Location: Various journalism nonprofits throughout the United States
Pay: $8,000 for 10-weeks, plus $1,000 travel stipend
Description: “The program is aimed at undergraduate, graduate and journalism students interested in using technology to tell stories in new and dynamic ways. The Fellows will get the opportunity to spend the summer contributing to a variety of organizations — from those that are steeped in investigative journalism to those working for press freedom around the world and to those that are helping the industry figure out its future in the digital age.”
Disclaimer: I was a 2014 Google fellow.

Atlantic Media Fellowship Program
Deadline: End of February 2015
Location: Washington, D.C. and New York City
Pay: $25,000 per year, with full benefits
Description: “Atlantic Media offers high-achieving recent college graduates a unique opportunity to participate in the Atlantic Media Fellowship Program. The Program is a structured, year-long paid fellowship for top-tier talent committed to editorial-side or business-side careers in media. Each year we look forward to our new class of Fellows, who add a fresh perspective and new ideas to our company initiatives. As a digital-first company, we have experienced tremendous growth as a result of emphasis on digital initiatives, and our Fellows have been key contributors.”

The Seattle Times
Deadline: Nov. 15.
Location: Seattle
Pay: $540 per week
Description: “The Seattle Times offers paid summer internships to outstanding students pursuing a career in journalism. For 10 weeks, interns work on varied assignments and attend weekly training sessions with members of a Pulitzer Prize-winning staff. Interns receive a skill-development plan and work with a staff mentor to achieve it. Internships are open to sophomores, juniors, seniors and graduate students attending a four-year college or university. Applicants must have a demonstrated commitment to print and online journalism. At least one previous internship at a daily news organization is preferred, and multimedia experience is a plus.”

Austin American-Statesman
Deadline: Nov. 7
Location: Austin, Texas
Pay: $450 per week, plus free housing.
Description: “Our objective is to help interns grow with challenging assignments. In other words, you won’t spend your time writing police briefs, taking mug shots and running errands. Last summer, one intern finished with three dozen bylines, three-quarters of which were on the front page or the Metro cover.”

The Chicago Tribune
Deadline: Dec. 1
Location: Chicago
Pay: Not listed
Description: “The Chicago Tribune’s newsroom internship program seeks college juniors, seniors and graduate students for 12-week paid internships. Opportunities will be considered in all newsroom departments: metro, sports, business, graphics, copy editing, design, photo/video, entertainment, events, social media and lifestyle.”

The Dallas Morning News
Deadline: Oct. 31
Location: Dallas
Pay: $15 per hour
Description: “We offer several 12-week college internships for news reporting, copy editing, business news, features, sports, photography and our website, dallasnews.com. Interns are treated as full-time staffers and typically, at least one is hired for a full-time position at the conclusion of the internship.”

Student Press Law Center
Deadline: Jan. 31
Location: Washington, D.C.
Pay: $3,500 stipend
Description: “Journalism interns research, write and help edit the Report, the Center’s magazine that chronicles student press law cases and controversies from around the country. Interns also write breaking news and analysis pieces for the Center’s website. Those with an interest in video and multimedia are especially encouraged to apply, and help us create the images that will bring students’ censorship experiences to life.”

The Oregonian
Deadline: Nov. 1
Location: Portland, Oregon
Pay: $440 per week
Description: “Oregonian Media Group offers a 10-week summer intern program for college students who wish to work as multimedia journalists in The Oregonian newsroom. We’re looking for primarily upperclassmen with previous internship experience who want to work in a digital-first environment doing smart stories for readers of OREGONLIVE.COM online and The Oregonian in print. We want critical thinkers, students who have a portfolio that shows ambition and skill across platforms, reporters and photographers who want to make a difference with readers – however those readers find us.
If selected, you will be assigned to a team for the summer, paired with a staff mentor and provided opportunities to learn from experienced journalists through group discussions with other interns.”

NPR’s Kroc Fellowship:
Deadline: Dec. 31
Location: NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., and member station.
Pay:: $40,000 per year
Description: “The Fellowship is designed to offer exposure to various units at NPR, in both the News and Digital Divisions, and at an NPR Member Station. NPR Kroc Fellows work alongside some of the nation’s most respected reporters, producers and editors and receive regular instruction in writing for radio and on-air performance. The Fellowship begins in August and lasts one year. Fellows receive a stipend of more than $40,000 and benefits, including paid vacation. NPR will provide Kroc Fellows with professional guidance and assist in job placement.”

Pulliam Journalism Fellowship
Deadline: Nov. 1
Location: Indianapolis and Phoenix
Pay: $650 per week
Description: “You’ll be a member of our newsroom, work hard and gain valuable journalism experience. You get paid, too. Our Pulliam Fellows earn $650/week for the 10-week program. You’ll also get to participate in writing workshops and learn over lunch from some of the best minds in journalism.”

Minneapolis Star Tribune
Deadline: Nov. 1
Location: Minneapolis
Pay:: $706 per week
Description: “The Star Tribune newsroom offers one of the best summer internship programs available in our industry. We select at least 10 candidates for paid 10-week internships each summer. The program targets college and graduate students interested in pursuing careers as reporters, copy editors/multiplatform editors, designers, photographers and multimedia producers.”

Chronicle of Higher Education
Deadline: Jan. Read more

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There’s ‘Bad News About The News’ (but also a little good news)

When The Brookings Institution asked Robert Kaiser to write an essay about the state of journalism, they asked that the last section include some solutions.

“And I had to tell them when I was finished that there would be no such section,” said Kaiser, who worked for more than 50 years at The Washington Post and retired in February. Kaiser is also the author of several books, including “The News About The News.” His essay for Brookings, which came out Thursday, is entitled “The Bad News About the News.”

In several chapters he looks both back and ahead at American journalism.

“I have to say that that process made me less optimistic than I had been before it began,” Kaiser said in a phone interview.

It’s misleading, Kaiser said, to look at all the great journalists and platforms and what they’re producing online and think journalism is in good shape. There’s still no real business model.

From his essay:

Despite two decades of trying, no one has found a way to make traditional news-gathering sufficiently profitable to assure its future survival. Serious readers of America’s most substantial news media may find this description at odds with their daily experience. After all, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Washington Post still provide rich offerings of good journalism every morning, and they have been joined by numerous online providers of both opinion and news—even of classic investigative reporting. Digital publications employ thousands of reporters and editors in new and sometimes promising journalistic enterprises. Is this a disaster?

Of course not—yet. But today’s situation is probably misleading. The laws of economics cannot be ignored or repealed. Nor can the actuarial tables. Only about a third of Americans under 35 look at a newspaper even once a week, and the percentage declines every year. A large portion of today’s readers of the few remaining good newspapers are much closer to the grave than to high school. Today’s young people skitter around the Internet like ice skaters, exercising their short attention spans by looking for fun and, occasionally, seeking out serious information. Audience taste seems to be changing, with the result that among young people particularly there is a declining appetite for the sort of information packages the great newspapers provided, which included national, foreign and local news, business news, cultural news and criticism, editorials and opinion columns, sports and obituaries, lifestyle features, and science news.

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“I believe that the crucial factor in the future of journalism of the kind that democracy depends on is the survival of a small but vibrant group of really first class institutions that have shared values and traditions and the capacity to train and cultivate the next generation capable of doing this work,” Kaiser said.

The kind of investigative journalism that comes out of the Post, the Times and the Journal is hard work, he said. “It’s not something any old blogger can walk through the door and do.”

Long term, what happens if a new business model isn’t found and those papers fold?

“My pessimism is dependent, I should confess freely, on my theory that if we don’t have a New York Times, Washington Post or Wall Street Journal, we’re a much lesser place than we were with them.”

Now for the good news. Kaiser does see a few things that are working. The first is the ProPublica model.

“They’re a fourth pillar in that universe with the other three,” he said. “However, it depends on the will of people to pay for it as an act of charity.”

And that, he said, isn’t really a business model.

The other comes from Post owner Jeff Bezos, and Kaiser calls it the angel investor solution. For someone with Bezos’ money, owning the Post probably costs him the equivalent of lunch money.

The problem is, Kaiser said, Bezos is competitive.

“He won’t like idea that The Washington Post lives because he props it up. He would much prefer, I’m sure, to invent the new business model and, God willing, he’ll do that.”

Kaiser is also encouraged by sites such as Vox, The Upshot from the Times and Wonkblog from the Post.

“That’s good because policy is traditionally short changed in American journalism.”

There are also local sites, including Voice of San Diego, that provide a service to their communities.

“It’s entirely plausible to me that my doomsday scenario is accurate but won’t be seen to be happening for some number of years,” Kaiser said. “That’s possible. It’s also possible it could happen much faster.”

Correction: An earlier version of this story used the word invest instead of invent in a quote. Read more

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How a small experiment at The Washington Post revolutionized its content management platform

About three years ago, The Washington Post embarked on a complete overhaul of the way it creates and publishes content online.

The project was ambitious. The Post — which then relied primarily on a legacy content management system called Méthode — wanted a platform that could handle articles, video, mobile apps and analytics, something that gave designers and producers the ability to quickly create and edit page templates.

So, the paper brought together a group of engineers, some handpicked from within the paper and others hired externally, and embedded them within the newsroom to see what reporters and producers needed, said Gregory Franczyk, chief architect at The Washington Post. They started with a temporary fix, gradually transitioning sections of the site to WordPress beginning with Wonkblog, which was then run by Ezra Klein.

Then, early last year, Post engineers were faced with a seemingly trivial task: make author pages for staff members without using the paper’s cumbersome CMS. To solve the problem, they developed a new platform — tentatively called Pagebuilder — that allows easy creation of page templates.

Because of its ease of use and aesthetic appeal, developers and editors at The Post began clamoring for content built with Pagebuilder, Franczyk said. A makeover of The Post’s recipes section came next, followed by Post TV, the paper’s video initiative. The platform was then used to build custom articles for the paper’s Olympic coverage and spin off a couple of standalone pages.

Now, what began as a simple experiment to improve the site’s author pages has evolved into the beginnings of a completely new content management platform for The Post. By this time next year, the paper plans to build the platform out into a suite of Web applications that encompass a variety of functions, including writing stories, planning editorial content and displaying it with a variety of page templates.

Taken together, those Web apps — pieces of software run through a browser — will constitute the paper’s content platform, which will be the equivalent of a nimble, flexible content managing system, Franczyk said in an email to Poynter.

“We need software that’s on the bleeding edge of technology in media, we haven’t found it, so we’re building it,” he said.

A screenshot of Pagebuilder, part of The Washington Post's forthcoming content platform (Credit: Gregory Franczyk)

A screenshot of Pagebuilder, part of The Washington Post’s forthcoming content platform (Credit: Gregory Franczyk)

Currently in development at The Post is an application tentatively titled “Storybuilder,” that will be the paper’s next-generation text editor, Franczyk said. Planned features include in-line comments for editors and change tracking, real-time collaboration and story previews for both mobile and the Web. The engineering team is also mulling other additions to Storybuilder, including a feature that would allow The Post to create an index of facts associated with each story. Using this index, Storybuilder could automatically update every story on a certain topic when a related article is updated, or notify editors when a particular story is out-of-date.

Also in the works is a “full photo-management solution” that will use a content ID system to automatically classify each photo uploaded by Post journalists and put them into a searchable index. The Post also plans to debut a separate content management system for its video that will take over many of the tasks currently handled by third-party software.

Although The Post developed the new platform primarily for internal use, the paper is considering making it available to other news organizations through a combination of open sourcing and subscription. The Post doesn’t yet have fixed pricing models in place, but it’s likely that news organizations could be charged for access to the apps and for hosting on The Post’s platform.

It’s possible, however, that “major components” of the platform will be open-source, Franczyk said.

The Post’s suite of Web apps presents a more specialized alternative to traditional do-it-all content management systems like Drupal and WordPress, Franczyk said. Because the apps are built with professional news organizations in mind, they will be able to use them out of the box, with little customization needed.

This week, The Post put that claim to the test, announcing Monday a selective testing program with two college news organizations, the (Columbia University) Daily Spectator and the (University of Maryland) Diamondback, which have each used parts of Pagebuilder to create in-depth online features.

By partnering with college news organizations, The Post gets to field-test its offerings in a low-stakes environment, said Shailesh Prakash, the paper’s chief information officer and vice president of technology. Traffic is generally lower and fewer pieces of content are posted daily compared to a professional news organization. Plus, The Post gets to connect its brand with the next generation of journalists.

The (University of Maryland) Diamondback used Washington Post's Pagebuilder to transform its series on Jayson Blair's tenure as a student editor.

The (University of Maryland) Diamondback used Washington Post’s Pagebuilder to transform its series on Jayson Blair’s tenure as a student editor.

So far, The Post is only sharing Pagebuilder’s rendering and presentation templates with its college partners, but the news organizations have already begun using them to spin off full-page feature stories. Staffers at The Diamondback have used it to repackage its three-part series on Jayson Blair, who was formerly editor of the paper. The Columbia Daily Spectator has already used the template to produce two feature packages, including an in-depth takeout of a disappointing fundraising initiative and a longread about diversity in Columbia’s theater scene.

The (Columbia University) Daily Spectator also used Pagebuilder to transform one of its stories, a long-form piece chronicling the woes of the Columbia Science Initiative.

The (Columbia University) Daily Spectator also used Pagebuilder to transform one of its stories, a long-form piece chronicling the woes of the Columbia Science Initiative.

So far, Diamondback staffers have run into little trouble using the platform, but they did struggle to fit ads onto the ornate feature pages, said Laura Blasey, the paper’s editor-in-chief. Steven Lau, the managing editor at The Columbia Daily Spectator, says Pagebuilder has allowed the paper to make high-quality content without skilled developers, which are generally rare at college newspapers.

“At a college paper, you’re there for four years or less, and I think this partnership with The Post is allowing us to focus on the stories we tell and not have to worry about the technology to do that,” Lau said.

The two student news organizations were chosen for their proximity to The Post’s offices — one in New York and one in Washington, D.C. — as well as their respective reputations, Prakash said. The paper is in talks to expand the tryout to other college publications that have expressed interest in the platform.

The iteration and disruptive thinking that helped produce Pagebuilder — and the suite of applications that will follow — is necessary for news organizations that want to stay relevant in the coming years, Prakash said in an email to Poynter.

“Content is king, but the design of the presentation, the speed of the product, the quality of the feature set and the seamlessness with which it is presented across platforms is equally important,” Prakash said. Read more

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Carlos Lozada: It’s OK if readers use reviews ‘as a substitute for reading the book’

Carlos Lozada announced Monday he would leave his job editing The Washington Post’s Sunday opinion section, Outlook, and become its nonfiction book critic. He’ll replace Jonathan Yardley, who is retiring.

Over email, Lozada talked about his new job, and his plans for it.

Poynter: So why would anyone leave an exhausting job shepherding opinion copy into print every week for the leisurely life of a book critic?
Carlos Lozada: Editing Outlook was my dream job for so long, long before I came to the Post, actually, that it’s hard to imagine doing anything else. It’s really the best job I’ve ever had. But I’ve been doing it for five years, so I’ve been thinking about my next move for a while now. The prospect of trying to rethink the book criticism genre, which I’ve dabbled in, seemed like a fun new challenge. So when I learned that Jon Yardley would be retiring, I made my pitch. And if I do it right and the way I’m thinking about it, it won’t be leisurely at all.

So how do you plan to do the job differently?
I’ll continue writing a review every week, which will still appear in Outlook, but I plan to write a lot more throughout the week, focused on building a digital audience. Look for author interviews; short posts that highlight key nuggets from new books; deep dives on trends in nonfiction (like a piece on “The End of Everything” I wrote last year on all the books titled “the end” of something); and stories on the role books play in the life of Washington. Also, while I know that lots of people use reviews to help them decide which books to buy and read, lots of them also see reviews as a substitute for reading the book. I certainly do – there isn’t enough time to read everything, right? And I want to respect those readers and their needs, too, which is where I hope these other forms can help.

Wasn’t there some point where you were going to move into a different job from Outlook?
Yes, back in 2012, I was going to take on a new newsroom-wide role as enterprise editor for the Post. The job got caught in a management/timing snafu – basically the week I moved into it, we learned that Marcus Brauchli, the executive editor who created the job and wanted me for it, was going to leave the paper. So rather than move into a hazy role with an uncertain mandate during a leadership transition, I scooted back to Outlook, which fortunately hadn’t been filled yet. Not an ideal situation, but given what I’m going to get to do now, I think it was for the best. I joke with my colleagues that this time I’m really leaving…

The opinion shop seems like it has really been growing lately, just like the rest of the Post. Do you know who will replace you?
I can think of some really strong candidates for it. Looking forward to seeing what [Executive Editor] Marty [Baron] and [Managing Editor] Kevin [Merida] decide.

Last question: It sounds like you’ll be able to do some reporting in this job. Will you get into the business of bookselling? I can think of a company that might be really interesting to cover!
Ha! I don’t plan to cover the business of publishing – I’ll leave that for our great business/financial writers. There is enough between the covers for me.

DISCLOSURE: Lozada has written passionately about journalism clichés, so it pains me to present a conversation we had about his new job in one of the laziest, most clichéd and useless forms of a news story: The Q&A. (I have argued in the past that no one should ever publish them.) But he could only talk over email, and I am traveling this week, so this disappointing compromise is the best I can do. Read more

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Washington Post’s chief revenue officer heads for Yahoo

Kevin Gentzel, The Washington Post’s chief revenue officer, is headed to Yahoo, where he’ll be head of advertising sales, North America, an internal memo from Steve Hills, president and general manager of Washington Post Media, announced on Tuesday.

Kevin is a unique talent and an excellent leader. He has left an indelible mark on our organization and helped us build real momentum in the marketplace. We are growing our digital audience dramatically, and that growth is coming from the young readers that our advertisers most want to reach, so we are earning that momentum every day. Kevin leaves behind a stronger, more nimble and innovative sales organization that will undoubtedly continue our march forward. Thank you Kevin, for all you did for The Post in your time here.

Here’s the full memo:

Kevin Gentzel heads for Yahoo

In September, outgoing publisher Katharine Weymouth mentioned Gentzel in a farewell memo as someone “who has built a world-class, innovative advertising sales team.” Read more

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Regional-paper readers really like getting Washington Post content with their subscriptions

This spring, the Washington Post launched a program that let subscribers to partner newspapers access its paywalled content. 165 have signed up so far.

New research the Post’s research and analytics team conducted (you can read it below) suggests the partnerships have benefited both parties: Almost two thirds of subscribers of partner newspapers “report that they are much more or more likely to continue their print subscription for the next six months because free access to The Washington Post website and apps is a benefit of their subscription,” one slide says.

About 1,300 subscribers to the partner papers who had activated their free subscriptions completed the survey this past summer. The Post invited these readers at random, across all the partner papers.

“We had a belief it would do this but you never know till you get the research back,” Post President and General Manager Stephen Hills said in a phone call.

People who work at some of the Post’s partner papers back up the findings: “Out of the gate, the Washington Post program has been an unqualified success, with really remarkable uptake from subscribers on very little promotion,” Steve Yaeger, the (Minneapolis) Star Tribune’s vice president for marketing and PR, told Poynter.

Tom Zeller, The (Toledo, Ohio) Blade’s audience development manager, said his paper had a “pretty aggressive home delivery price increase this year,” Zeller said, “and we looked at this as something to add value.”

Since the program kicked off, he said, “our price-related stops have been a little bit lower.” The Blade has seen a lot of conversions, and it has also used the program to promote its own digital efforts, he said.

The survey asked respondents what topics they found interesting: 71 percent said national news (excluding politics), 67 percent said international news and 64 percent said national politics. All are subject areas in which many regional newspapers have made cutbacks in recent years. “That’s why the pitch that I made when presenting this to people in the business was that they are providing local content that consumers can’t get elsewhere,” Hills said. “Our national reporting is a natural complement to what their papers are doing.”

“I feel for a regional paper, The Blade has pretty strong national and international coverage,” Zeller said. “It’s not like we have a hole there,” he said, but the program “augmented it by adding very high quality journalism.”

The relationship is unlubricated by cash: “No money changes hands,” Hills said. “What we’re doing it for is to get the promotion and increase the national exposure of The Washington Post.”

It also helps the Post in its ambitions to be a more national outlet. “I think at the macro level it helps as we become more known for this, and as we expand our national footprint,” Hills said. And the program “has opened the possibility of talking about lots of different ways we could partner” with other outlets, he said.

Washington Post Digital Partner Program research

Related: The Newsonomics of the Washington Post and New York Times Network Wars (Newsonomics) Read more

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Dorian Nakamoto looks to sue Newsweek over Bitcoin story

mediawiremorningHey, hi. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Lawsuit over Newsweek’s Bitcoin story? The man who Newsweek’s Leah McGrath Goodman identified as the founder of Bitcoin is raising money on a website to sue the magazine, claiming he was “targeted and victimized by a reckless news organization.” Dorian Nakamoto has been unemployed for 10 years, the site says. “Donations, obviously, can be made by bitcoin.” (TechCrunch) | Previously: In March, Nakamoto told the AP he hadn’t heard of Bitcoin until his son told him about it after talking to Newsweek: “I got nothing to do with it.” (Poynter)
  2. Snyderman sorry for violating Ebola quarantine: The 21-day quarantine for NBC News crew members who traveled to Liberia is now mandatory after Dr. Nancy Snyderman violated the voluntary quarantine. “As a health professional I know that we have no symptoms and pose no risk to the public, but I am deeply sorry for the concerns this episode caused.” (THR) | The freelance cameraman who contracted Ebola and is recovering, Ashoka Mukpo, tweeted his “endless gratitude for the good vibes.” (NBC News) | Ebola-related: The New York Post fronts the Dallas nurse who contracted Ebola — and her dog. (New York Post) | Bentley “is being held in isolation and watched closely, but it is unlikely that he will have to be euthanized, Dallas city officials said.” (Mashable)
     


     

  3. Christie and Clinton overkill? Since Jan. 1, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie was been the most-mentioned potential Republican presidential contender, according to a LexisNexis search of 15 top newspapers, with Mitt Romney, Ted Cruz and Rand Paul not far behind. Hillary Clinton, of course, is the most-referenced Democrat — and it’s not close at all. “Overall, more stories have talked about potential GOP candidates (202) than Democratic ones (115).” (Pew Research Center)
  4. Kushner no longer OC Register’s publisher: New publisher and CEO Richard Mirman takes over for the beleaguered Aaron Kushner, who remains CEO of Freedom Communications, which owns the newspaper. Mirman is an investor in the Register. (Orange County Register) | Previously: The Los Angeles Register closed last month after just five months of operation (Poynter), and the Register reportedly owes the Los Angeles Times $3.5 million in distribution fees. (OC Weekly)
  5. Rift between Guardian and NYT? When The Guardian’s hard drives were being smashed by British authorities in 2013, the newspaper arranged for The New York Times to share and protect some of its Snowden documents. But now, Lloyd Grove reports, some Times editors are frustrated with The Guardian’s “total control over the Snowden cache, including how and when it can be used to develop, pursue and publish investigations.” Counters Times executive editor Dean Baquet: “I don’t feel held captive by The Guardian, because I wouldn’t have access to these particular documents without The Guardian.” (The Daily Beast)
  6. White House’s Secret Service spin: “White House reporters are often too swamped to fully check out every assertion made by the White House’s press operation, and in this case officials seized on a phrase that is in the report. The report is rather complicated and someone reading quickly might not catch the nuance that this was not actually a finding, but merely a claim made by, among others, by the very person whose credibility is questioned throughout the report.” (Washington Post)
  7. BBC looks at “hybrid” broadcast-Internet radio on phones: “Nearly two thirds of the mobile phone owners surveyed found the idea of hybrid radio appealing and said it could be a deciding factor when faced with a choice between phones with similar specs.” (BBC)
  8. Not front page of the day: A story on A1 of some editions of The New York Times today is missing a byline and lede.
     


     

  9. Front page of the day, curated by Kristen Hare: Times-Journal of Fort Payne, Alabama, with a very not-lifesize picture of Ebola (Courtesy the Newseum).
     
    AL_TJ
     
  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Betsy Woodruff will be a politics writer for Slate. She’s currently a politics writer at the Washington Examiner. ‏(@woodruffbets) | Carlos Lozada will be a nonfiction book critic at The Washington Post. Previously, he edited Outlook there. (Washington Post) | Josef Federman is now Jerusalem bureau chief for The Associated Press. Previously, he was a news editor at the AP. (AP) | Chris Carter is now digital services sales director for The Alliance for Audited Media. Previously, he was director of business development for DG Interactive. (AAM) | Job of the day: The Associated Press is looking for a photo editor. Get your résumés in! (AP) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

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David Plotz now CEO of Atlas Obscura

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • Jonah Freedman is now editor-in-chief of StubHub. Previously, he was managing editor of MLSsoccer.com. (Pando Daily)
  • David Plotz is now CEO of Atlas Obscura. Previously, he was editor of Slate (Washington Post)
  • Brie Dyas is now senior work life editor at The Huffington Post. Previously, she was executive home editor there. (The Huffington Post)
  • Jordan Chariton will be New York media editor at The Wrap. He’s editor of TVNewser. Mark Joyella will be a co-editor for TV Spy and TVNewser. Previously, he was a TV editor at Mediaite. Brian Flood is now co-editor of TVNewser. Previously, he had written for Sports Illustrated and RotoExperts. (TV Newser)

Job of the day: WBEZ is looking for a midday anchor. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs)

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Former Time Inc. CTO joins magazine startup

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • Frédéric Michel will be a consultant for Sky Italia. He is Telefónica’s Europe director of public affairs and communication. (The Guardian)
  • Bob Mason is now vice president of hosting at NewsCycle Solutions. Previously, he was chief technology officer at Digital First Media. (Poynter)
  • Gregg Doyel is now a sports columnist at The Indianapolis Star. Previously, he was a columnist at CBSSports.com. (The Indianapolis Star)
  • Mike Stamm is now a senior design technologist at The Washington Post. Previously, he led design technology at The Wall Street Journal. Jessie Tseng is an interaction designer at The Washington Post. Previously, she was a user experience designer at Adaptly. (The Washington Post)
  • Sheena Lyonnais will be a freelance writer. Previously, she was managing editor of Yonge Street Media. (Yonge Street Media)
  • Susi Park is general manager of advertising for GQ. Previously, she was assistant general manager of advertising at Wired. (Email)
  • Abe Cytryn is now chief technology officer for Magzter. Previously, he was chief technology officer at Time Inc. (Email)

Job of the day: The Washington Post is looking for a religion writer. Get your résumés in! (The Washington Post)

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Men’s Health demonstrates how not to talk about sports with anyone

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. CNN will cut 300 jobs: About 130 people have taken buyouts, and 170 more will be laid off, Brian Stelter reports. Parent Turner Broadcasting plans to lay off 1,475 people. (CNN) | “Turner said it was adding 150 employees in growth areas.” (NYT)
  2. How not to talk about sports with anyone: Men’s Health tweeted an image of a woman holding a foam finger under the legend “How to Talk about Sports with Women.” The link led to a slight Teresa Sabga story called “The Secret to Talking Sports with Any Woman.” The mag apologized on Twitter: “It missed the mark and the negative feedback is justified. We’ve deleted it.” (@MensHealthMag) | A brief selection of reactions: “is this a joke?” (@AishaS) | “hi @MensHealthMag, you don’t know me, but i run @ESPNMag’s annual analytics issue. also, i have a vagina!” (@megreenwell) | “The article (article?) itself is 100 words of non-advice.” (The Daily Dot)
  3. College rescinds George Will’s speaking engagement: Scripps College uninvited Will from speaking at the all-women school. Will wrote a stupid column about sexual assault earlier this year. “They didn’t say that the column was the reason, but it was the reason,” Will told Brad Richardson. He was due to speak at the Elizabeth Hubert Malott Public Affairs Program, which aims to “bring speakers to campus whose political views differ from the majority of students.” (The Claremont Independent) | The St. Louis Post-Dispatch dumped Will’s column last June. “The column was offensive and inaccurate; we apologize for publishing it,” Tony Messenger wrote. (St. Louis Post-Dispatch) | An all-male cast of editors handled the column. (WP)
  4. L.A. Times says Aaron Kushner owes it millions: It stopped delivering the Orange County Register (and the now-shuttered Los Angeles Register) in L.A., telling Gustavo Arellano the Register “has, for more than a year and a half, been consistently late in paying money it owes The Times for services rendered.” (OC Weekly) | “The shame about the U.S. economy in the 2000s is that it’s been marked by a dearth of Aaron Kushners.” (Forbes)
  5. Scammers target Denver Post subscribers: “The notices offer one-year renewals to The Denver Post for the low, low price of only $489.95, which equates to 410 percent more than the actual current amount for The Post’s All Access Plus digital replica subscription and about 71 percent more than a new seven-day print subscription.” (The Denver Post) | Subscribers of several McClatchy papers, including The Sacramento Bee and the Charlotte Observer, have also been hit. (Sac Bee) | OOF: “Criminals should get -30- to life.” (@jfdulac)
  6. Amazon will help spread Washington Post content: A Kindle app, free for those who buy a certain model and paid for those who buy others, “will offer a curated selection of news and photographs from the daily newspaper in a magazine-style, tablet-friendly format.” (Bloomberg Businessweek) | “[I]f it increases the Post‘s reach (either for readers or advertisers, or both) and it doesn’t cost Amazon or Bezos too much, then it is a slam-dunk.” (Gigaom) | “Honest question: How many of you are listening to U2’s new album because Apple forced it into your iTunes library?” (@dylanbyers) | (Honest answer: I gave it many chances but still can’t recall most of the songs.) | Marginally related: Margaret Sullivan looked at whether NYT has covered Amazon v. Hachette fairly. (NYT) | FLASHBACK: Times reporter David Streitfeld on Amazon: “They don’t care if they’re liked, or even if they’re understood. That makes them challenging to write about.” (Poynter)
  7. Lessons from The New Yorker’s Web redesign: “Right on down to the font choice and page breaks, every decision we made, we first asked ourselves, ‘How will this affect whether or not people will read a story from beginning to the end?’” NewYorker.com Editor Nicholas Thompson tells John Brownlee. (Fast Company)
  8. A meh-moir: An oral history of the NYT’s Meh List. “[N]o one lived it like Mark Leibovich, who developed a sixth sense for meh.” By Samantha Henig, with additional reporting and user experience by Jon Kelly. (Poynter)
  9. Front page of the day, curated by Kristen Hare: The Asheville (North Carolina) Citizen-Times greets autumn, beautifully. (Courtesy the Newseum.)

    asheville-10072014 

  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: David Gillen is now executive editor of news enterprise at Bloomberg News. Previously, he was deputy business editor of enterprise at The New York Times. (Politico) | Loren Mayor is now chief operating officer for NPR. Previously, she was senior vice president of strategy there. (Poynter) | Mike Grunwald will be a senior staff writer at Politico magazine. He is a senior national correspondent for Time magazine. (Playbook) | Weston Phippen is now a reporter for the National Journal. Previously, he was a staff writer at the Tampa Bay Times. Lauren Fox will be a Congress reporter at the National Journal. Previously, she was a political reporter at U.S. News and World Report. (Email) | Mark Brackenbury has been named executive editor for the Connecticut Group at Digital First Media. He is managing editor for the New Haven Register. (New Haven Register) | Colleen Noonan has been named vice president of marketing and creative service for the New York Daily News. Previously, she was a digital media and marketing consultant at Pitney Bowes. Melanie Schnuriger is now vice president of product development for the New York Daily News. Previously, she was general manager of fashion and beauty for Hearst Digital Media. Kristen Lee is director of digital development for the New York Daily News. Previously, she was digital integration editor there. Brad Gerick is now director of social media for the New York Daily News. He has been social media manager and regional editor for Patch.com. Zach Haberman is now deputy managing editor for digital at the New York Daily News. Previously, he was digital news editor there. Cristina Everett is now deputy managing editor for digital entertainment at the New York Daily News. Previously, she was senior digital entertainment editor there. Andy Clayton is now deputy managing editor for digital sports at the New York Daily News. Previously, he was senior online sports editor there. Christine Roberts is mobile and emerging products editor at the New York Daily News. Previously, she was an associate homepage editor there. (Email) | Job of the day: BuzzFeed is looking for a National LGBT Reporter. Get your résumés in! (BuzzFeed) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org
    Suggestions? Criticisms? Would like me to send you this roundup each morning? Please email me: abeaujon@poynter.org.
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