Articles about "The Washington Post"


Career Beat: Rachel Zarrell named news editor at BuzzFeed News

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • Rachel Zarrell is now news editor at BuzzFeed News. Previously, she was a weekend editor there. (‏@rachelzarrell)
  • Ben Calhoun is now director of content and programming at WBEZ in Chicago. Previously, he was a producer for “This American Life.” (Robert Feder)
  • Ada Guerin is now creative director at The Wrap. Previously, she was design director and associate art director at The Hollywood Reporter. (The Wrap)
  • Jose Zamora is now on the board of directors of the Online News Association. He is director of strategic communications at Univision Network. (ONA)
  • Carla Zanoni will be global audience development director at The Wall Street Journal. Previously, she was director of social media and engagement at DNAinfo.com. (Carla Zanoni)
  • Tara Adiseshan is now a Knight-Mozilla fellow at The New York Times and The Washington Post.
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‘It ain’t necessarily so’: 7 quotes from Ben Bradlee in 1986

In 1986, Poynter’s Newsleaders series filmed an interview with Ben Bradlee, then editor of The Washington Post. Bradlee died on Tuesday, October 21, at the age of 93.

You can see the full interview, in which Bradlee talks about Watergate, the Pentagon Papers and his partnership with Katharine Graham.

Here are seven things he said from that interview in 1986. Let’s begin with the introduction, because, well, you’ll see.

1. “It ain’t necessarily so.”

2. “… A better informed world is a better world.”

3. “The power of The Washington Post lies first and above all in the fact that it is published in the capital of the free world. It’s a geographic power. I mean, if we were in Omaha, we would not be as powerful as we are.”

4. “If I meet someone new, it’s odds on that they’ll say, ‘well you don’t look like Jason Robards.’”

5. Read more

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Career Beat: Joe Weisenthal heads to Bloomberg

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • Joe Weisenthal will host a TV show and develop a market-focused website for Bloomberg. He is executive editor at Business Insider. (Business Insider)
  • Ashkan Soltani will be chief technologist at the Federal Trade Commission. Previously, he was an independent privacy researcher who helped The Washington Post cover the National Security Agency. (WP)
  • Mick Greenwood is head of video at Time Inc. UK. Previously, he was managing editor of video at MSN. Richard Giddings is now head of mobile at Time Inc. UK. Previously, he was digital editions program manager there. (Time Inc.)

Job of the day: Vice News is looking for an associate producer. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs)

Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org Read more

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That time Ben Bradlee thanked Richard Nixon

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Remembering Ben Bradlee on Twitter: Carlos Lozada, The Washington Post’s incoming nonfiction book critic, began tweeting passages from Ben Bradlee‘s memoir, “A Good Life,” after the former Post executive editor died Tuesday. (@CarlosLozadaWP) | 196 or so tweets later, here’s a selection: “It would be ungrateful of me not to pause here and acknowledge the role of Richard Milhouse Nixon in furthering my career.” (@CarlosLozadaWP) | “Make no mistake about it: there is only one thing an editor must have to be a good editor, and that is a good owner.” (@CarlosLozadaWP) | “When a job candidate came in with good clips but was soft spoken and reticent, #Bradlee’s verdict: ‘Ehhh. Nothing clanks when he walks.’” (@CarlosLozadaWP)
  2. More Bradlee: Here’s a long video interview he did with Poynter in 1986. (Poynter) | Don Graham: “I would like to tell you why we all loved Ben Bradlee so much — loved working for him, loved working with him — and why we felt he could make anything possible.” (WP) | Jill Abramson: “One of the sadnesses of my career is that I never worked for him.” (Time) | David Remnick: The “most overstated notion about Bradlee was the idea that he was an ideological man.” (The New Yorker) | David Carr: “By some estimations, including his own, his most enduring accomplishment had nothing to do with the Pentagon Papers or Watergate.
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Ben Bradlee dead at 93

FILE - In this June 21, 1971 file photo, Washington Post Executive Director Ben Bradlee and Post Publisher Katharine Graham leave U.S. District Court in Washington. Bradlee died Tuesday, Oct. 21, 2014, according to the Washington Post. (AP Photo, File)

FILE – In this June 21, 1971 file photo, Washington Post Executive Director Ben Bradlee and Post Publisher Katharine Graham leave U.S. District Court in Washington. Bradlee died Tuesday, Oct. 21, 2014, according to the Washington Post. (AP Photo, File)

The Washington Post | The New Yorker | Time

Ben Bradlee, editor of The Washington Post from 1965 to 1991, died on Tuesday at 93 of natural causes, former managing editor Robert G. Kaiser wrote for the Post.

Bradlee’s time as editor of the Post included coverage of Watergate and the Pentagon Papers — still some of journalism’s biggest stories.

During his tenure, a paper that had previously won just four Pulitzer Prizes, only one of which was for reporting, won 17 more, including the Public Service award for the Watergate coverage.

“Ben Bradlee was the best American newspaper editor of his time and had the greatest impact on his newspaper of any modern editor,” said Donald E.

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Here are 38 great journalism internships and fellowships for application season

For journalism students, October through January is internship application season, a pressure cooker of equal parts excitement and anxiety.

It’s our profession’s draft day. By mid-march, most of your classmates will have declared their intention to work at a journalism organization, like a prized NFL recruit putting on their team’s hat in front of a live studio audience.

Don’t get left behind. Some of the applications for the most prestigious news organizations are due in a few weeks time, so work up the courage to request that letter of recommendation, update your résumé and figure out how stamps work.

To make the process a little easier, I’ve compiled a list of some of the best journalism internships I could find on the Web, many of which I applied for myself when I was in school. If you have questions about this list or know some great internships I’ve forgotten, tweet them to #POYinternlist or send me an email: bmullin@poynter.org. Read more

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There’s ‘Bad News About The News’ (but also a little good news)

When The Brookings Institution asked Robert Kaiser to write an essay about the state of journalism, they asked that the last section include some solutions.

“And I had to tell them when I was finished that there would be no such section,” said Kaiser, who worked for more than 50 years at The Washington Post and retired in February. Kaiser is also the author of several books, including “The News About The News.” His essay for Brookings, which came out Thursday, is entitled “The Bad News About the News.”

In several chapters he looks both back and ahead at American journalism.

“I have to say that that process made me less optimistic than I had been before it began,” Kaiser said in a phone interview.

It’s misleading, Kaiser said, to look at all the great journalists and platforms and what they’re producing online and think journalism is in good shape. There’s still no real business model. Read more

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How a small experiment at The Washington Post revolutionized its content management platform

About three years ago, The Washington Post embarked on a complete overhaul of the way it creates and publishes content online.

The project was ambitious. The Post — which then relied primarily on a legacy content management system called Méthode — wanted a platform that could handle articles, video, mobile apps and analytics, something that gave designers and producers the ability to quickly create and edit page templates.

So, the paper brought together a group of engineers, some handpicked from within the paper and others hired externally, and embedded them within the newsroom to see what reporters and producers needed, said Gregory Franczyk, chief architect at The Washington Post. They started with a temporary fix, gradually transitioning sections of the site to WordPress beginning with Wonkblog, which was then run by Ezra Klein.

Then, early last year, Post engineers were faced with a seemingly trivial task: make author pages for staff members without using the paper’s cumbersome CMS. Read more

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Carlos Lozada: It’s OK if readers use reviews ‘as a substitute for reading the book’

Carlos Lozada announced Monday he would leave his job editing The Washington Post’s Sunday opinion section, Outlook, and become its nonfiction book critic. He’ll replace Jonathan Yardley, who is retiring.

Over email, Lozada talked about his new job, and his plans for it.

Poynter: So why would anyone leave an exhausting job shepherding opinion copy into print every week for the leisurely life of a book critic?
Carlos Lozada: Editing Outlook was my dream job for so long, long before I came to the Post, actually, that it’s hard to imagine doing anything else. It’s really the best job I’ve ever had. But I’ve been doing it for five years, so I’ve been thinking about my next move for a while now. The prospect of trying to rethink the book criticism genre, which I’ve dabbled in, seemed like a fun new challenge. So when I learned that Jon Yardley would be retiring, I made my pitch. Read more

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Washington Post’s chief revenue officer heads for Yahoo

Kevin Gentzel, The Washington Post’s chief revenue officer, is headed to Yahoo, where he’ll be head of advertising sales, North America, an internal memo from Steve Hills, president and general manager of Washington Post Media, announced on Tuesday.

Kevin is a unique talent and an excellent leader. He has left an indelible mark on our organization and helped us build real momentum in the marketplace. We are growing our digital audience dramatically, and that growth is coming from the young readers that our advertisers most want to reach, so we are earning that momentum every day. Kevin leaves behind a stronger, more nimble and innovative sales organization that will undoubtedly continue our march forward. Thank you Kevin, for all you did for The Post in your time here.

Here’s the full memo:

Kevin Gentzel heads for Yahoo

In September, outgoing publisher Katharine Weymouth mentioned Gentzel in a farewell memo as someone “who has built a world-class, innovative advertising sales team.” Read more

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