Articles about "The Washington Post"


Career Beat: Rachel Zarrell named news editor at BuzzFeed News

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • Rachel Zarrell is now news editor at BuzzFeed News. Previously, she was a weekend editor there. (‏@rachelzarrell)
  • Ben Calhoun is now director of content and programming at WBEZ in Chicago. Previously, he was a producer for “This American Life.” (Robert Feder)
  • Ada Guerin is now creative director at The Wrap. Previously, she was design director and associate art director at The Hollywood Reporter. (The Wrap)
  • Jose Zamora is now on the board of directors of the Online News Association. He is director of strategic communications at Univision Network. (ONA)
  • Carla Zanoni will be global audience development director at The Wall Street Journal. Previously, she was director of social media and engagement at DNAinfo.com. (Carla Zanoni)
  • Tara Adiseshan is now a Knight-Mozilla fellow at The New York Times and The Washington Post. Previously, she worked on search design at Autodesk and conducted research focused on harvesting rainwater in India. Juan Elosua is now a Knight-Mozilla fellow at La Nacion. He is a telecommunications engineer and data journalist. Livia Labate is now a Knight-Mozilla fellow at NPR. Previously, she led Marriott’s digital standards and practices group. Linda Sandvik is now a Knight-Mozilla fellow at The Guardian. Previously, she worked in local government. Julia Smith is now a Knight-Mozilla fellow at the Center for Investigative Reporting. Previously, she was a designer and developer on news sites and mobile applications. Francis Tseng is now a Knight-Mozilla fellow at The New York Times and The Washington Post He currently teaches at the New School’s Design + Journalism program. (dansinker.com)
  • Jon Garinn is now medical editor of the Radiology Administration department at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. Previously, he was managing editor of CURE Magazine. (email)

Job of the day: Politico is looking for a lobbying reporter. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs)

Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org Read more

Tools:
0 Comments
Screen Shot 2014-10-22 at 11.00.17 AM

‘It ain’t necessarily so’: 7 quotes from Ben Bradlee in 1986

In 1986, Poynter’s Newsleaders series filmed an interview with Ben Bradlee, then editor of The Washington Post. Bradlee died on Tuesday, October 21, at the age of 93.

You can see the full interview, in which Bradlee talks about Watergate, the Pentagon Papers and his partnership with Katharine Graham.

Here are seven things he said from that interview in 1986. Let’s begin with the introduction, because, well, you’ll see.

1. “It ain’t necessarily so.”

2. “… A better informed world is a better world.”

3. “The power of The Washington Post lies first and above all in the fact that it is published in the capital of the free world. It’s a geographic power. I mean, if we were in Omaha, we would not be as powerful as we are.”

4. “If I meet someone new, it’s odds on that they’ll say, ‘well you don’t look like Jason Robards.’”

5. “I’m more worried about the relationship of the press and government, to working that out, rather than I am worried about the relationship of the press and the public. I think the public eventually works that out pretty well, it seems to me.”


6. “We’ve got a lot of jobs to do but one of them is not be loved. We don’t have to be loved. We have to be respected, I think.”

7. “I hope people will be sorry that I’ve gone, will be appreciative of what I’ve tried to do, but I think it will be a blip.”

Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

Career Beat: Joe Weisenthal heads to Bloomberg

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • Joe Weisenthal will host a TV show and develop a market-focused website for Bloomberg. He is executive editor at Business Insider. (Business Insider)
  • Ashkan Soltani will be chief technologist at the Federal Trade Commission. Previously, he was an independent privacy researcher who helped The Washington Post cover the National Security Agency. (WP)
  • Mick Greenwood is head of video at Time Inc. UK. Previously, he was managing editor of video at MSN. Richard Giddings is now head of mobile at Time Inc. UK. Previously, he was digital editions program manager there. (Time Inc.)

Job of the day: Vice News is looking for an associate producer. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs)

Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

That time Ben Bradlee thanked Richard Nixon

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Remembering Ben Bradlee on Twitter: Carlos Lozada, The Washington Post’s incoming nonfiction book critic, began tweeting passages from Ben Bradlee‘s memoir, “A Good Life,” after the former Post executive editor died Tuesday. (@CarlosLozadaWP) | 196 or so tweets later, here’s a selection: “It would be ungrateful of me not to pause here and acknowledge the role of Richard Milhouse Nixon in furthering my career.” (@CarlosLozadaWP) | “Make no mistake about it: there is only one thing an editor must have to be a good editor, and that is a good owner.” (@CarlosLozadaWP) | “When a job candidate came in with good clips but was soft spoken and reticent, #Bradlee’s verdict: ‘Ehhh. Nothing clanks when he walks.’” (@CarlosLozadaWP)
  2. More Bradlee: Here’s a long video interview he did with Poynter in 1986. (Poynter) | Don Graham: “I would like to tell you why we all loved Ben Bradlee so much — loved working for him, loved working with him — and why we felt he could make anything possible.” (WP) | Jill Abramson: “One of the sadnesses of my career is that I never worked for him.” (Time) | David Remnick: The “most overstated notion about Bradlee was the idea that he was an ideological man.” (The New Yorker) | David Carr: “By some estimations, including his own, his most enduring accomplishment had nothing to do with the Pentagon Papers or Watergate. … In 1969, he conjured Style, a hip, cheeky section of the newspaper that reflected the tumult of the times in a city where fashion and discourse were rived with a maddening sameness.” (NYT) | Mark Athitakis: “At the risk of being a pedant, WaPo has an ‘ironclad rule’ for obits that nobody dies of ‘natural causes’… but Ben Bradlee, the Post reports, died of ‘natural causes.’” (@mathitak) | Newsweek will run some of his articles for that magazine today. (@Newsweek) | OK, one more Lozada tweet: “In the Washington bureau of Newsweek, even one’s most beautiful prose was rewritten by some faceless bastard in New York.” (@CarlosLozadaWP)
  3. Brian Stelter vs. Rush Limbaugh vs. Brian Stelter: “If Limbaugh really thinks he knows what’s in the president’s head, if he really thinks people ‘at the highest levels of government’ believe in some diseased form of payback for slavery, he should defend this thinking — not hide behind a three-week-old sound bite from a CNN guest.” (CNN)
  4. Colorado county decides newspaper ruling was incorrect: Larimer County Clerk and Recorder Angela Myers reversed an order that said Colorado State University’s newspaper, The Rocky Mountain Collegian, couldn’t be placed near a polling place. (The Denver Post) | “‘It’s the law that you’re not supposed to have electioneering materials in that area, and I am the enforcer of that,’ Myers said.” (The Rocky Mountain Collegian)
  5. Maybe Edward Snowden’s biggest contribution to journalism: He insisted reporters in contact with him use encryption. “Snowden has now provided a highly visible example of how, in a very high-stakes situation, encryption can, at a minimum, create time and space for independent journalistic decision-making about what to publish and why,” Steve Coll writes. (The New Yorker)
  6. Why she left the news: “I’m tired of jockeying for position in a profession that never hesitates to finger ‘racists’ in public, but can’t see the very real racism in its own newsrooms,” Rebecca Carroll writes. (The New Republic)
  7. NBC News freelancer declared free of Ebola: Ashoka Mukpo announced he was in the clear on Twitter. (USA Today) | “be on the lookout for the Ebola Diaries blog coming soon. Will compile material from long-term reporter residents of Liberia” (@unkyoka)
  8. How the West might be won: The California Sunday Magazine’s plans for nailing down the left coast’s lean-back reading hours. (CJR)
  9. Front page of the day, curated by Kristen Hare: Bradlee on the Post’s front page: “An editor of legendary impact.”. (Courtesy the Newseum.)

    wapo-10222014 

  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Joe Weisenthal will host a TV show and develop a market-focused website for Bloomberg. He is executive editor at Business Insider. (Business Insider) | Ashkan Soltani will be chief technologist at the Federal Trade Commission. Previously, he was an independent privacy researcher who helped The Washington Post cover the National Security Agency. (WP) | Mick Greenwood is head of video at Time Inc. UK. Previously, he was managing editor of video at MSN. Richard Giddings is now head of mobile at Time Inc. UK. Previously, he was digital editions program manager there. (Time Inc.) | Job of the day: Vice News is looking for an associate producer. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would like me to send you this roundup each morning? Please email me: abeaujon@poynter.org. Read more

Tools:
0 Comments
Screen Shot 2014-10-21 at 9.11.26 PM

Ben Bradlee dead at 93

FILE - In this June 21, 1971 file photo, Washington Post Executive Director Ben Bradlee and Post Publisher Katharine Graham leave U.S. District Court in Washington. Bradlee died Tuesday, Oct. 21, 2014, according to the Washington Post. (AP Photo, File)

FILE – In this June 21, 1971 file photo, Washington Post Executive Director Ben Bradlee and Post Publisher Katharine Graham leave U.S. District Court in Washington. Bradlee died Tuesday, Oct. 21, 2014, according to the Washington Post. (AP Photo, File)

The Washington Post | The New Yorker | Time

Ben Bradlee, editor of The Washington Post from 1965 to 1991, died on Tuesday at 93 of natural causes, former managing editor Robert G. Kaiser wrote for the Post.

Bradlee’s time as editor of the Post included coverage of Watergate and the Pentagon Papers — still some of journalism’s biggest stories.

During his tenure, a paper that had previously won just four Pulitzer Prizes, only one of which was for reporting, won 17 more, including the Public Service award for the Watergate coverage.

“Ben Bradlee was the best American newspaper editor of his time and had the greatest impact on his newspaper of any modern editor,” said Donald E. Graham, who succeeded his mother as publisher of The Post and Mr. Bradlee’s boss.

“So much of The Post is Ben,” Mrs. Graham said in 1994, three years after Bradlee retired as editor. “He created it as we know it today.”

David Remnick wrote about Bradlee’s death for The New Yorker.

Recently, Tom Zito, a feature writer and critic at the Post during the Bradlee era, told me this story:

“One afternoon in the fall of 1971, I was summoned to Ben’s office. I was the paper’s rock critic at the time. A few minutes earlier, at the Post’s main entrance, a marshal from the Department of Justice had arrived, bearing a grand-jury subpoena in my name. As was the case ever since the Department of Justice and the Post had clashed over the Pentagon Papers, earlier that year, rules about process service dictated that the guard at the front desk call Bradlee’s office, where I was now sitting and being grilled about the business of the grand jury and its potential impact on the paper. I explained that my father was of Italian descent, lived in New Jersey, had constructed many publicly financed apartment buildings—and was now being investigated by the U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York regarding income-tax evasion. ‘Your father?’ Ben exclaimed in disbelief, and then called out to his secretary, ‘Get John Mitchell on the phone.’ In less than a minute, the voice of the Attorney General could be heard on the speaker box, asking, somewhat curtly, ‘What do you want, Ben?’ In his wonderfully gruff but patrician demeanor, and flashing a broad smile to me, Ben replied, ‘What I want is for you to never again send a subpoena over here asking any of my reporters to give grand-jury testimony about their parents. And if you do, I’m going to personally come over there and shove it up your ass.’ The subpoena was quashed the next day.”

The Post has quotes on Bradlee from a number of its stars, including Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein.

“Ben was a true friend and genius leader in journalism. He forever altered our business. His one unbending principle was the quest for the truth and the necessity of that pursuit. He had the courage of an army. Ben had an intuitive understanding of the history of our profession, its formative impact on him and all of us. But he was utterly liberated from that. He was an original who charted his own course. We loved him deeply, and he will never be forgotten or replaced in our lives.”

On October 3, Jill Abramson, former executive editor of The New York Times, wrote about Bradlee for Time, including how he weathered the scandal after it was revealed that Pulitzer winner Janet Cooke made up the work that won her that Pulitzer.

During that time Ben showed what he was made of. He had to return a Pulitzer Prize that Cooke had won about a made up 8-year-old heroin addict. He had to invite his boss, Donald Graham, to have breakfast at his house and tell him that he and his vaunted team of all-stars, made famous in the movie All the President’s Men, had failed the Graham family. He had to face his own crushed newsroom and, ultimately, the Post’s disappointed readers.

This would surely have brought down any other editor. So why did Ben Bradlee survive and triumph? It wasn’t simply because he was so powerful or well connected, having transformed the Post during Watergate into a national newspaper and showcase for the blazingly talented writers he hired and nurtured. Bob Woodward tried to explain Ben’s durability after the top editors at the Times lost their jobs in the Jayson Blair scandal. “Bradlee was a great editor and loved by everybody,” Woodward said. “Not just the people who knew him well, but down the ranks.”

On Tuesday night, journalists shared quotes from Bradlee on Twitter.


Ben Bradlee, former executive editor of The Washington Post, seated during an event sponsored by The Washington Post to commemorate the 40th anniversary of Watergate Monday, June 11, 2012 at the Watergate office building in Washington. Bradlee died on Tuesday. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Ben Bradlee, former executive editor of The Washington Post, seated during an event sponsored by The Washington Post to commemorate the 40th anniversary of Watergate Monday, June 11, 2012 at the Watergate office building in Washington. Bradlee died on Tuesday. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Read more

Tools:
0 Comments
Screen Shot 2014-10-17 at 4.27.01 PM

Here are 38 great journalism internships and fellowships for application season

For journalism students, October through January is internship application season, a pressure cooker of equal parts excitement and anxiety.

It’s our profession’s draft day. By mid-march, most of your classmates will have declared their intention to work at a journalism organization, like a prized NFL recruit putting on their team’s hat in front of a live studio audience.

Don’t get left behind. Some of the applications for the most prestigious news organizations are due in a few weeks time, so work up the courage to request that letter of recommendation, update your résumé and figure out how stamps work.

To make the process a little easier, I’ve compiled a list of some of the best journalism internships I could find on the Web, many of which I applied for myself when I was in school. If you have questions about this list or know some great internships I’ve forgotten, tweet them to #POYinternlist or send me an email: bmullin@poynter.org.

The New York Times James Reston Reporting Fellowship
Deadline: Oct. 31
Location: New York City
Pay: $1,000 per week
Description: “Beginning with the second week, the Reston Fellows start work in a section that reflects their skills and area of interest to report and write stories under the guidance of editors or senior reporters. Some stories are assigned, but fellows are encouraged to come up with their own ideas. They also participate in workshops with ranking editors and reporters. The goal of the program is to provide an opportunity for the fellows to stretch their journalistic skills with the help of some of the best reporters and editors in the country.”

The Washington Post
Deadline: Nov. 7
Location: Washington, D.C.
Pay: $750 per week
Description: “Our interns write articles, edit copy, take photographs, design pages and produce graphics. We treat them as staff members during their 12 weeks of employment.”

The Boston Globe
Deadline: Nov. 1
Location: Boston
Pay: $700 per week
Description: “Summer interns work as full-time employees for 12 weeks, between Memorial Day and Labor Day. Interns are paid a weekly wage, and shifts vary. An intern supervisor serves as a writing coach and there are weekly meetings with editors and staff members on a range of issues and topics pertaining to journalism.”

Associated Press Global News Internship
Deadline: Not settled yet; likely the first week of January, per AP spokesman Paul Colford.
Location: Major cities throughout the world
Pay: Not listed
Description: “The summer 2014 Global News Internship is a paid, highly selective, 12-week individually tailored training program for students who are aspiring cross-format journalists. Interns must have experience and/or training in video and one other format. They will contribute to AP’s text, video, photo and interactive reporting.”

Reuters Global Journalism Internships
Deadline: Dec. 1
Location: Major cities throughout the world
Pay: Not listed
Description: “The Reuters Global Journalism Internships offer talented students and graduates an opportunity to learn and shine in our bureaus internationally. The paid internships are a crash course in hands-on business, political and general news reporting. Every intern will report to a senior editor and be assigned a journalist mentor to provide advice and guidance during the summer. They’re expected to write regularly and deliver in-depth stories during their assignment. Interns will receive several days of formal training before they start work, focused on writing skills, journalism ethics and basic financial knowledge. They may also be able to take advantage of other, regularly scheduled training opportunities during the summer, depending on where they’re based.”

Texas Tribune News Apps Internships
Deadline: Nov. 15
Location: Austin, Texas
Pay: $5,000 over 10 weeks
Description: “Are you a journalism student or would-be reporter in another major? Know a little bit about HTML, CSS, JavaScript, and/or Python/Django, and would like to continue to hone your skills? Are you passionate about politics, policy and open government? You should join us. You’ll work directly with news apps developers, reporters and editors in the newsroom. Interns are first-class citizens on our team – in the past, they’ve had the opportunity to not only contribute to high-profile projects but to take the lead on them. You’ll get to create data visualizations and maps, participate in an active and friendly newsroom, play a role in editorial meetings and contribute to a number of different beats. We’re looking for someone passionate about web standards and the little details. Someone willing to show their work. Someone looking to learn. If you’re interested, send your resume and links to previous projects and/or your GitHub account to rmurphy@texastribune.org.”

Texas Tribune reporting internship
Deadline: Nov. 15
Location: Austin, Texas
Pay: $2,000 over 10 weeks
Description: The Texas Tribune internship program provides aspiring journalists the opportunity to hone their reporting skills and learn a host of new ones that will prepare them for the 21st century newsroom. “This is not a teaching hospital,” in the words of our fearless leader, CEO and Editor-in-Chief Evan Smith. We expect interns who are anxious to dive into daily news coverage alongside our seasoned reporting staff. Interns at the Tribune write stories and blog posts, shoot photos and video, develop news apps and assist with our major data projects. Intern work has appeared in Texas editions of The New York Times through our partnership with the most prestigious newspaper in the country.

Reuters Journalism Program
Deadline: Dec. 15
Location: New York, London or Asia
Pay: Not listed
Description: “The Reuters Journalism Program offers nine months of hands-on, real-world experience with competitive pay in New York, London and Asia. You will gain a deep grounding in all aspects of financial reporting, work on fast-paced news stories and develop skills in enterprise journalism. The program seeks rising reporters, recent graduates or business professionals who can demonstrate a clear commitment to a career in journalism and an ability to generate story ideas relevant for a Reuters audience.”

The Los Angeles Times
Deadline: Jan. 1
Location: Los Angeles, Washington D.C.
Pay: $700 per week
Description: “Interested in working with some of the best journalists around? We offer 10 weeks of intensive, hands-on experience in a region where big stories are the norm. We place interns throughout the L.A. Times: Metro/Local, Sports, Business, Features (Home, Image, Travel, Food, Mind & Body), Arts & Entertainment, Editorial Pages, Washington, D.C., bureau, Photography/Video, Data Desk, Visualization & Graphics, Design and latimes.com. These are paid internships and summer placements usually run from mid-June to late August.”

The Tampa Bay Times
Deadline: Nov. 1
Location: St. Petersburg, Tampa, Clearwater, Port Richey and Brooksville
Pay: $450 per week
Description: “Florida’s largest and best newspaper, with 10 Pulitzer Prizes, is looking for energetic, talented young people for internships in all of its departments. Internships range from 12-week summer experiences to 6-month and 1-year jobs. You will be considered a full staff member and work alongside colleagues who will serve as mentors. Our internship programs are designed to give you hands-on experience to add to your academic credentials.

The South Florida Sun Sentinel
Deadline: Nov. 15
Location: Fort Lauderdale
Pay: $7.93 per hour
Description: “We offer seven paid internships throughout our digital-print newsroom. For 11 intensive weeks, from June to mid-August, you will report and write stories, shoot and edit video-photo, or design. We treat our interns as regular staffers, under the guidance of seasoned journalists. We offer internships in various newsroom departments: Metro-news, business, features, sports, video-photo, design, and our Spanish-language weekly, El Sentinel. We also offer weekly sessions with veteran journalists and senior editors on a wide range of topics, including career advice. It’s hard work and great fun.”

Google Journalism Fellowship
Deadline: Around the end of January
Location: Various journalism nonprofits throughout the United States
Pay: $8,000 for 10-weeks, plus $1,000 travel stipend
Description: “The program is aimed at undergraduate, graduate and journalism students interested in using technology to tell stories in new and dynamic ways. The Fellows will get the opportunity to spend the summer contributing to a variety of organizations — from those that are steeped in investigative journalism to those working for press freedom around the world and to those that are helping the industry figure out its future in the digital age.”
Disclaimer: I was a 2014 Google fellow.

Atlantic Media Fellowship Program
Deadline: End of February 2015
Location: Washington, D.C. and New York City
Pay: $25,000 per year, with full benefits
Description: “Atlantic Media offers high-achieving recent college graduates a unique opportunity to participate in the Atlantic Media Fellowship Program. The Program is a structured, year-long paid fellowship for top-tier talent committed to editorial-side or business-side careers in media. Each year we look forward to our new class of Fellows, who add a fresh perspective and new ideas to our company initiatives. As a digital-first company, we have experienced tremendous growth as a result of emphasis on digital initiatives, and our Fellows have been key contributors.”

The Seattle Times
Deadline: Nov. 15.
Location: Seattle
Pay: $540 per week
Description: “The Seattle Times offers paid summer internships to outstanding students pursuing a career in journalism. For 10 weeks, interns work on varied assignments and attend weekly training sessions with members of a Pulitzer Prize-winning staff. Interns receive a skill-development plan and work with a staff mentor to achieve it. Internships are open to sophomores, juniors, seniors and graduate students attending a four-year college or university. Applicants must have a demonstrated commitment to print and online journalism. At least one previous internship at a daily news organization is preferred, and multimedia experience is a plus.”

The Colorado Springs Gazette
Deadline: Feb. 15
Location: Colorado Springs, Colorado
Pay: Not listed
Description: “The Gazette is a Pulitzer Prize-winning newspaper in the heart of Colorado Springs. We offer both paid and unpaid (for-credit) internships. Reporting interns may be called upon to write for any news section of our paper and online sites, depending on our needs, their interests and skills.”

Austin American-Statesman
Deadline: Nov. 7
Location: Austin, Texas
Pay: $450 per week, plus free housing.
Description: “Our objective is to help interns grow with challenging assignments. In other words, you won’t spend your time writing police briefs, taking mug shots and running errands. Last summer, one intern finished with three dozen bylines, three-quarters of which were on the front page or the Metro cover.”

The Chicago Tribune
Deadline: Dec. 1
Location: Chicago
Pay: Not listed
Description: “The Chicago Tribune’s newsroom internship program seeks college juniors, seniors and graduate students for 12-week paid internships. Opportunities will be considered in all newsroom departments: metro, sports, business, graphics, copy editing, design, photo/video, entertainment, events, social media and lifestyle.”

The Dallas Morning News
Deadline: Oct. 31
Location: Dallas
Pay: $15 per hour
Description: “We offer several 12-week college internships for news reporting, copy editing, business news, features, sports, photography and our website, dallasnews.com. Interns are treated as full-time staffers and typically, at least one is hired for a full-time position at the conclusion of the internship.”

Student Press Law Center
Deadline: Jan. 31
Location: Washington, D.C.
Pay: $3,500 stipend
Description: “Journalism interns research, write and help edit the Report, the Center’s magazine that chronicles student press law cases and controversies from around the country. Interns also write breaking news and analysis pieces for the Center’s website. Those with an interest in video and multimedia are especially encouraged to apply, and help us create the images that will bring students’ censorship experiences to life.”

The Oregonian
Deadline: Nov. 1
Location: Portland, Oregon
Pay: $440 per week
Description: “Oregonian Media Group offers a 10-week summer intern program for college students who wish to work as multimedia journalists in The Oregonian newsroom. We’re looking for primarily upperclassmen with previous internship experience who want to work in a digital-first environment doing smart stories for readers of OREGONLIVE.COM online and The Oregonian in print. We want critical thinkers, students who have a portfolio that shows ambition and skill across platforms, reporters and photographers who want to make a difference with readers – however those readers find us.
If selected, you will be assigned to a team for the summer, paired with a staff mentor and provided opportunities to learn from experienced journalists through group discussions with other interns.”

NPR’s Kroc Fellowship:
Deadline: Dec. 31
Location: NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., and member station.
Pay:: $40,000 per year
Description: “The Fellowship is designed to offer exposure to various units at NPR, in both the News and Digital Divisions, and at an NPR Member Station. NPR Kroc Fellows work alongside some of the nation’s most respected reporters, producers and editors and receive regular instruction in writing for radio and on-air performance. The Fellowship begins in August and lasts one year. Fellows receive a stipend of more than $40,000 and benefits, including paid vacation. NPR will provide Kroc Fellows with professional guidance and assist in job placement.”

Pulliam Journalism Fellowship
Deadline: Nov. 1
Location: Indianapolis and Phoenix
Pay: $650 per week
Description: “You’ll be a member of our newsroom, work hard and gain valuable journalism experience. You get paid, too. Our Pulliam Fellows earn $650/week for the 10-week program. You’ll also get to participate in writing workshops and learn over lunch from some of the best minds in journalism.”

Minneapolis Star Tribune
Deadline: Nov. 1
Location: Minneapolis
Pay:: $706 per week
Description: “The Star Tribune newsroom offers one of the best summer internship programs available in our industry. We select at least 10 candidates for paid 10-week internships each summer. The program targets college and graduate students interested in pursuing careers as reporters, copy editors/multiplatform editors, designers, photographers and multimedia producers.”

Chronicle of Higher Education
Deadline: Jan. 5
Location: Washington, D.C.
Pay: $625 per week
Description: “The Chronicle’s internships aim to give current undergraduates and recent college graduates the opportunity to gain professional experience at the No. 1 source for news about higher education. Applicants must show a strong interest in pursuing a career in journalism with relevant coursework or prior experience. The internships are full time in our Washington, D.C., office. In addition to a $625 weekly stipend, academic credit can often be arranged.”

News 21 fellowship
Deadline:: Nov. 10
Location: Phoenix
Pay: $7,500 for 10 weeks (plus travel expenses)
Description: “During the summer, fellows work full time out of a digital newsroom at the Cronkite School for 10 weeks, typically beginning in mid to late May and ending in late July or early August. Fellows receive a $7,500 stipend plus travel expenses. The cost of housing is not covered, but the Cronkite School will make arrangements for university dormitory housing on ASU’s downtown Phoenix campus next to the Cronkite building.”

Wall Street Journal internship program
Deadline: Nov. 1
Location: Varies. Interns have worked in New York, Detroit and Atlanta.
Pay: $700
Description: “The Wall Street Journal is looking for interns to work in our bureaus throughout North America. Interns work closely with reporters and editors to deliver prompt, accurate reporting of news and features relevant to their beat. Applications are due by November 1 and must include a cover letter, resume and up to six published clips.”

The Miami Herald
Deadline: Oct. 31
Location: Miami
Pay: $520 per week
Description: “We offer internships in multimedia, programming and digital design. Limited slots also are available in news, business, features and sports reporting, photography/videography and copy editing. (All reporting internships presume multimedia work, by the way.) Internships last 10 weeks and pay $520 per week. Application deadline is Oct. 31 each year for slots to be filled the following year. Successful candidates can intern in the fall or winter of the calendar year.”

USA Today Collegiate Correspondent Program
Deadline: The deadline for the winter program closes Nov. 11.
Location: Work from wherever you’re based, submitting articles weekly
Pay: When I participated in this program during the spring semester of 2014, pay was $350 for 16 articles.
Description: “USA TODAY’s Collegiate Correspondent Program is one of the nation’s premier journalism opportunities for college students. Those that are chosen to participate in the writing program will pitch, research and write weekly stories. Those that are chosen to participate in the visual program will receive weekly assignments, complete a semester-long project and will partner with writers to produce cohesive stories. Content produced by all correspondents will appear across all USA TODAY and Gannett platforms, including mobile and tablet.”
Disclaimer: I was a 2014 USA Today Collegiate Correspondent

Scripps Howard Foundation Semester in Washington
Deadline: Nov. 1
Location: Washington, D.C.
Pay: $1,900, plus free housing
Description: “Interns report for work each day at the Scripps Howard Foundation Wire, which is housed in the same office as the Scripps Howard News Service, four blocks from the White House. They report and write a variety of stories. In addition to perfecting their reporting and writing skills, interns take photos and shoot and edit video. They meet with experts at the Capitol, the Supreme Court, the Student Press Law Center, the Washington Post, the State Department, the Pentagon and others to better understand how to cover the news.”

Scripps Howard Multimedia Fellowship
Deadline: April 1
Location: Washington, D.C.
Pay: $22,155 per year
Description: “The post-graduate, multimedia fellow manages and maintains the Scripps Howard Foundation Wire’s website. He or she creates multimedia projects for our website, works with undergraduate interns to develop multimedia projects and provides leadership to a team that produces news stories and projects. Qualified applicants must have professional-level expertise in HTML, content management systems and CSS. If you do not have these skills, this isn’t the fellowship for you.

Education Week newsroom intern
Deadline: No set deadline, but applicants should submit their materials before Jan. 1.
Location: Bethesda, Maryland
Pay $10 per hour
Description: “Editorial Projects in Education periodically seeks a general newsroom intern for Education Week, the respected, independent newspaper of record for K-12 education. This internship offers an excellent opportunity for students interested in journalism and education policy to gain focused, supportive training and professional experience. We accept internship applications year-round.”

The Baltimore Sun’s Mary J. Corey Journalism Internship
Deadline: Fall 2014
Location: Baltimore, Maryland
Pay: $575 per week, with a $1,000 housing stipend
Description: “The intern will work in the Sun newsroom as a reporter for 10-12 weeks sometime between May 15, 2015 and Aug. 31, 2015. (Exact dates will be determined mutually by the intern and Sun editors.) The intern would write daily stories in addition to a longer-term project.”

The Virginian-Pilot
Deadline: Oct. Read more

Tools:
1 Comment
Screen Shot 2014-10-16 at 9.08.09 AM

There’s ‘Bad News About The News’ (but also a little good news)

When The Brookings Institution asked Robert Kaiser to write an essay about the state of journalism, they asked that the last section include some solutions.

“And I had to tell them when I was finished that there would be no such section,” said Kaiser, who worked for more than 50 years at The Washington Post and retired in February. Kaiser is also the author of several books, including “The News About The News.” His essay for Brookings, which came out Thursday, is entitled “The Bad News About the News.”

In several chapters he looks both back and ahead at American journalism.

“I have to say that that process made me less optimistic than I had been before it began,” Kaiser said in a phone interview.

It’s misleading, Kaiser said, to look at all the great journalists and platforms and what they’re producing online and think journalism is in good shape. There’s still no real business model.

From his essay:

Despite two decades of trying, no one has found a way to make traditional news-gathering sufficiently profitable to assure its future survival. Serious readers of America’s most substantial news media may find this description at odds with their daily experience. After all, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Washington Post still provide rich offerings of good journalism every morning, and they have been joined by numerous online providers of both opinion and news—even of classic investigative reporting. Digital publications employ thousands of reporters and editors in new and sometimes promising journalistic enterprises. Is this a disaster?

Of course not—yet. But today’s situation is probably misleading. The laws of economics cannot be ignored or repealed. Nor can the actuarial tables. Only about a third of Americans under 35 look at a newspaper even once a week, and the percentage declines every year. A large portion of today’s readers of the few remaining good newspapers are much closer to the grave than to high school. Today’s young people skitter around the Internet like ice skaters, exercising their short attention spans by looking for fun and, occasionally, seeking out serious information. Audience taste seems to be changing, with the result that among young people particularly there is a declining appetite for the sort of information packages the great newspapers provided, which included national, foreign and local news, business news, cultural news and criticism, editorials and opinion columns, sports and obituaries, lifestyle features, and science news.

Screen Shot 2014-10-16 at 8.40.55 AM

“I believe that the crucial factor in the future of journalism of the kind that democracy depends on is the survival of a small but vibrant group of really first class institutions that have shared values and traditions and the capacity to train and cultivate the next generation capable of doing this work,” Kaiser said.

The kind of investigative journalism that comes out of the Post, the Times and the Journal is hard work, he said. “It’s not something any old blogger can walk through the door and do.”

Long term, what happens if a new business model isn’t found and those papers fold?

“My pessimism is dependent, I should confess freely, on my theory that if we don’t have a New York Times, Washington Post or Wall Street Journal, we’re a much lesser place than we were with them.”

Now for the good news. Kaiser does see a few things that are working. The first is the ProPublica model.

“They’re a fourth pillar in that universe with the other three,” he said. “However, it depends on the will of people to pay for it as an act of charity.”

And that, he said, isn’t really a business model.

The other comes from Post owner Jeff Bezos, and Kaiser calls it the angel investor solution. For someone with Bezos’ money, owning the Post probably costs him the equivalent of lunch money.

The problem is, Kaiser said, Bezos is competitive.

“He won’t like idea that The Washington Post lives because he props it up. He would much prefer, I’m sure, to invent the new business model and, God willing, he’ll do that.”

Kaiser is also encouraged by sites such as Vox, The Upshot from the Times and Wonkblog from the Post.

“That’s good because policy is traditionally short changed in American journalism.”

There are also local sites, including Voice of San Diego, that provide a service to their communities.

“It’s entirely plausible to me that my doomsday scenario is accurate but won’t be seen to be happening for some number of years,” Kaiser said. “That’s possible. It’s also possible it could happen much faster.”

Correction: An earlier version of this story used the word invest instead of invent in a quote. Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

How a small experiment at The Washington Post revolutionized its content management platform

About three years ago, The Washington Post embarked on a complete overhaul of the way it creates and publishes content online.

The project was ambitious. The Post — which then relied primarily on a legacy content management system called Méthode — wanted a platform that could handle articles, video, mobile apps and analytics, something that gave designers and producers the ability to quickly create and edit page templates.

So, the paper brought together a group of engineers, some handpicked from within the paper and others hired externally, and embedded them within the newsroom to see what reporters and producers needed, said Gregory Franczyk, chief architect at The Washington Post. They started with a temporary fix, gradually transitioning sections of the site to WordPress beginning with Wonkblog, which was then run by Ezra Klein.

Then, early last year, Post engineers were faced with a seemingly trivial task: make author pages for staff members without using the paper’s cumbersome CMS. To solve the problem, they developed a new platform — tentatively called Pagebuilder — that allows easy creation of page templates.

Because of its ease of use and aesthetic appeal, developers and editors at The Post began clamoring for content built with Pagebuilder, Franczyk said. A makeover of The Post’s recipes section came next, followed by Post TV, the paper’s video initiative. The platform was then used to build custom articles for the paper’s Olympic coverage and spin off a couple of standalone pages.

Now, what began as a simple experiment to improve the site’s author pages has evolved into the beginnings of a completely new content management platform for The Post. By this time next year, the paper plans to build the platform out into a suite of Web applications that encompass a variety of functions, including writing stories, planning editorial content and displaying it with a variety of page templates.

Taken together, those Web apps — pieces of software run through a browser — will constitute the paper’s content platform, which will be the equivalent of a nimble, flexible content managing system, Franczyk said in an email to Poynter.

“We need software that’s on the bleeding edge of technology in media, we haven’t found it, so we’re building it,” he said.

A screenshot of Pagebuilder, part of The Washington Post's forthcoming content platform (Credit: Gregory Franczyk)

A screenshot of Pagebuilder, part of The Washington Post’s forthcoming content platform (Credit: Gregory Franczyk)

Currently in development at The Post is an application tentatively titled “Storybuilder,” that will be the paper’s next-generation text editor, Franczyk said. Planned features include in-line comments for editors and change tracking, real-time collaboration and story previews for both mobile and the Web. The engineering team is also mulling other additions to Storybuilder, including a feature that would allow The Post to create an index of facts associated with each story. Using this index, Storybuilder could automatically update every story on a certain topic when a related article is updated, or notify editors when a particular story is out-of-date.

Also in the works is a “full photo-management solution” that will use a content ID system to automatically classify each photo uploaded by Post journalists and put them into a searchable index. The Post also plans to debut a separate content management system for its video that will take over many of the tasks currently handled by third-party software.

Although The Post developed the new platform primarily for internal use, the paper is considering making it available to other news organizations through a combination of open sourcing and subscription. The Post doesn’t yet have fixed pricing models in place, but it’s likely that news organizations could be charged for access to the apps and for hosting on The Post’s platform.

It’s possible, however, that “major components” of the platform will be open-source, Franczyk said.

The Post’s suite of Web apps presents a more specialized alternative to traditional do-it-all content management systems like Drupal and WordPress, Franczyk said. Because the apps are built with professional news organizations in mind, they will be able to use them out of the box, with little customization needed.

This week, The Post put that claim to the test, announcing Monday a selective testing program with two college news organizations, the (Columbia University) Daily Spectator and the (University of Maryland) Diamondback, which have each used parts of Pagebuilder to create in-depth online features.

By partnering with college news organizations, The Post gets to field-test its offerings in a low-stakes environment, said Shailesh Prakash, the paper’s chief information officer and vice president of technology. Traffic is generally lower and fewer pieces of content are posted daily compared to a professional news organization. Plus, The Post gets to connect its brand with the next generation of journalists.

The (University of Maryland) Diamondback used Washington Post's Pagebuilder to transform its series on Jayson Blair's tenure as a student editor.

The (University of Maryland) Diamondback used Washington Post’s Pagebuilder to transform its series on Jayson Blair’s tenure as a student editor.

So far, The Post is only sharing Pagebuilder’s rendering and presentation templates with its college partners, but the news organizations have already begun using them to spin off full-page feature stories. Staffers at The Diamondback have used it to repackage its three-part series on Jayson Blair, who was formerly editor of the paper. The Columbia Daily Spectator has already used the template to produce two feature packages, including an in-depth takeout of a disappointing fundraising initiative and a longread about diversity in Columbia’s theater scene.

The (Columbia University) Daily Spectator also used Pagebuilder to transform one of its stories, a long-form piece chronicling the woes of the Columbia Science Initiative.

The (Columbia University) Daily Spectator also used Pagebuilder to transform one of its stories, a long-form piece chronicling the woes of the Columbia Science Initiative.

So far, Diamondback staffers have run into little trouble using the platform, but they did struggle to fit ads onto the ornate feature pages, said Laura Blasey, the paper’s editor-in-chief. Steven Lau, the managing editor at The Columbia Daily Spectator, says Pagebuilder has allowed the paper to make high-quality content without skilled developers, which are generally rare at college newspapers.

“At a college paper, you’re there for four years or less, and I think this partnership with The Post is allowing us to focus on the stories we tell and not have to worry about the technology to do that,” Lau said.

The two student news organizations were chosen for their proximity to The Post’s offices — one in New York and one in Washington, D.C. — as well as their respective reputations, Prakash said. The paper is in talks to expand the tryout to other college publications that have expressed interest in the platform.

The iteration and disruptive thinking that helped produce Pagebuilder — and the suite of applications that will follow — is necessary for news organizations that want to stay relevant in the coming years, Prakash said in an email to Poynter.

“Content is king, but the design of the presentation, the speed of the product, the quality of the feature set and the seamlessness with which it is presented across platforms is equally important,” Prakash said. Read more

Tools:
3 Comments
Screen Shot 2014-10-14 at 2.55.51 PM

Carlos Lozada: It’s OK if readers use reviews ‘as a substitute for reading the book’

Carlos Lozada announced Monday he would leave his job editing The Washington Post’s Sunday opinion section, Outlook, and become its nonfiction book critic. He’ll replace Jonathan Yardley, who is retiring.

Over email, Lozada talked about his new job, and his plans for it.

Poynter: So why would anyone leave an exhausting job shepherding opinion copy into print every week for the leisurely life of a book critic?
Carlos Lozada: Editing Outlook was my dream job for so long, long before I came to the Post, actually, that it’s hard to imagine doing anything else. It’s really the best job I’ve ever had. But I’ve been doing it for five years, so I’ve been thinking about my next move for a while now. The prospect of trying to rethink the book criticism genre, which I’ve dabbled in, seemed like a fun new challenge. So when I learned that Jon Yardley would be retiring, I made my pitch. And if I do it right and the way I’m thinking about it, it won’t be leisurely at all.

So how do you plan to do the job differently?
I’ll continue writing a review every week, which will still appear in Outlook, but I plan to write a lot more throughout the week, focused on building a digital audience. Look for author interviews; short posts that highlight key nuggets from new books; deep dives on trends in nonfiction (like a piece on “The End of Everything” I wrote last year on all the books titled “the end” of something); and stories on the role books play in the life of Washington. Also, while I know that lots of people use reviews to help them decide which books to buy and read, lots of them also see reviews as a substitute for reading the book. I certainly do – there isn’t enough time to read everything, right? And I want to respect those readers and their needs, too, which is where I hope these other forms can help.

Wasn’t there some point where you were going to move into a different job from Outlook?
Yes, back in 2012, I was going to take on a new newsroom-wide role as enterprise editor for the Post. The job got caught in a management/timing snafu – basically the week I moved into it, we learned that Marcus Brauchli, the executive editor who created the job and wanted me for it, was going to leave the paper. So rather than move into a hazy role with an uncertain mandate during a leadership transition, I scooted back to Outlook, which fortunately hadn’t been filled yet. Not an ideal situation, but given what I’m going to get to do now, I think it was for the best. I joke with my colleagues that this time I’m really leaving…

The opinion shop seems like it has really been growing lately, just like the rest of the Post. Do you know who will replace you?
I can think of some really strong candidates for it. Looking forward to seeing what [Executive Editor] Marty [Baron] and [Managing Editor] Kevin [Merida] decide.

Last question: It sounds like you’ll be able to do some reporting in this job. Will you get into the business of bookselling? I can think of a company that might be really interesting to cover!
Ha! I don’t plan to cover the business of publishing – I’ll leave that for our great business/financial writers. There is enough between the covers for me.

DISCLOSURE: Lozada has written passionately about journalism clichés, so it pains me to present a conversation we had about his new job in one of the laziest, most clichéd and useless forms of a news story: The Q&A. (I have argued in the past that no one should ever publish them.) But he could only talk over email, and I am traveling this week, so this disappointing compromise is the best I can do. Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

Washington Post’s chief revenue officer heads for Yahoo

Kevin Gentzel, The Washington Post’s chief revenue officer, is headed to Yahoo, where he’ll be head of advertising sales, North America, an internal memo from Steve Hills, president and general manager of Washington Post Media, announced on Tuesday.

Kevin is a unique talent and an excellent leader. He has left an indelible mark on our organization and helped us build real momentum in the marketplace. We are growing our digital audience dramatically, and that growth is coming from the young readers that our advertisers most want to reach, so we are earning that momentum every day. Kevin leaves behind a stronger, more nimble and innovative sales organization that will undoubtedly continue our march forward. Thank you Kevin, for all you did for The Post in your time here.

Here’s the full memo:

Kevin Gentzel heads for Yahoo

In September, outgoing publisher Katharine Weymouth mentioned Gentzel in a farewell memo as someone “who has built a world-class, innovative advertising sales team.” Read more

Tools:
0 Comments