Articles about "The Washington Post"


Police Shooting Missouri

Media organizations to police in Ferguson: ‘We are appalled’

A protester runs through smoke deployed by police Wednesday, Aug. 13, 2014, in Ferguson, Mo. Protests in the St. Louis suburb rocked by racial unrest since a white police officer shot an unarmed black teenager to death turned violent Wednesday night, with people lobbing Molotov cocktails at police who responded with smoke bombs and tear gas to disperse the crowd. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)

“In a time of technology and terrorism, citizens and visual journalists throughout the world have risked and in some cases given their lives to provide visual proof of governmental activities,” Mickey Osterreicher, general counsel for the National Photographers Press Association, wrote in a letter to the chief of police in Ferguson, Missouri, on Thursday. “Sadly, what is viewed as heroic abroad is often considered as suspect at home.”

The arrest of two reporters Wednesday night in Ferguson and the treatment of other journalists there prompted letters and statements from several organizations.… Read more

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Police Shooting Missouri

Cop to reporter: ‘You’re going to be in my jail cell tonight’

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories. Maybe it’s not really 10. Let’s not dwell on specifics.

  1. Reporters arrested, assaulted in Ferguson: Washington Post reporter Wesley Lowery and Huffington Post reporter Ryan J. Reilly were arrested Wednesday night while covering the unrest in Ferguson, Missouri. (Poynter) | They were working in a McDonald’s when police ordered them to leave. Both started documenting the transaction on their phones. Lowery said one cop slammed him into a soda fountain after his bag slipped off his shoulder and he ducked down to get it; Reilly said a cop pushed him into a plate-glass window and “sarcastically apologized.” (HuffPost) | In his account of his arrest, Lowery writes that he told an arresting officer “This story’s going to get out there.
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Don Graham bids adieu to The Washington Post building

Former Washington Post chief Don Graham posted a goodbye to his old paper’s building on Facebook Monday night. “This probably was my last day at 1150 15th Street after 43 years,” he wrote. “The Post seems to be in wonderful shape under Jeff Bezos, Katharine Weymouth and Marty Baron.”


Graham Holdings Company, the former Washington Post Co., is moving from Washington, D.C., to Arlington, Virginia.

GraHoCo offered items from its art collection to Post employees last month, with proceeds designated to TheDream.us, a scholarship fund for undocumented students that Graham founded.

The Post won’t be in its 15th Street building for much longer either; it plans to move to a building with a serious Dan Brown connection. … Read more

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Screen Shot 2014-08-07 at 8.24.49 AM

Yet another NYT digital tier?

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Another NYT subscription tier? Lucia Moses reports: “According to a survey sent to readers this week, the new offering would give users 30 articles a month for $8, over 45 percent lower than the current cheapest offering.” (Digiday) | The Times has also floated the prospect of a shorter print edition in a survey, Joe Pompeo reported last week. (Capital) | The launch of its most recent digital products “has been anything but smooth.” (Poynter) | Sam Kirkland shows you how to save money on your NYT sub. (Poynter)
  2. Edward Snowden to stay longer in Russia: He got a three-year residence permit, his lawyer says. He’ll be able to travel abroad.
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Tennessean-AP

Tennessean will use data, not ‘the journalist’s gut,’ to make decisions

Good morning. Here are 10 (ha ha, OK, you got me, it’s more than 10) media stories.

  1. 21st Century Fox won’t pursue Time Warner: Rupert Murdoch sent a honcho-to-honcho email to Jeffrey L. Bewkes Tuesday afternoon, notifying the Time Warner chief he was withdrawing his previous offer. (NYT) | “Arguably, shareholders had scuttled” the deal already, Brian Stelter writes: “21st Century Fox shares had dropped nearly 10% since the initial bid for Time Warner earlier this summer.” (CNN) | “Long media nerd earnings day. Was going to be fun. But now… [sad trombone]” (@pkafka) | “One large Fox investor said the market is worried about Murdoch’s discipline when it comes to deal-making,” Cristina Alesci reported Tuesday morning. (CNN) | Time Warner revenue was up 3 percent in the second quarter of 2014 over the same period the year before.
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Earns Gannett

Gannett spins off, Murdoch and Time Warner square off

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Gannett will split publishing, broadcast assets: Its acquistion of broadcast companies and the 73 percent of Cars.com it didn’t own make this “the right time for a separation,” CEO Gracia Martore says in a statement. Robert J. Dickey will run the publishing company, which be called Gannett and will hold USA Today and 81 dailies, plus the U.K.’s Newsquest. (Poynter) | Just yesterday, Ken Doctor asked whether Gannett would be the next big media company to split its assets. (Nieman) | Rick Edmonds explained the rash of splits last week. Newspaper groups can “theoretically do better with management whose exclusive focus is on the particular challenges of that industry,” he wrote. (Poynter)
  2. Let us now observe Rupert Murdoch’s mating dance: Time Warner’s “unyielding stance has at least some analysts wondering if an acquisition really is inevitable,” Jonathan Mahler writes.
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New York Times Slim

NYT acknowledges Carol Vogel lifted from Wikipedia

Good morning. 10-ish, anyone?

  1. NYT acknowledges Carol Vogel lifted from Wikipedia: Part of a July 25 column “used specific language and details from a Wikipedia article without attribution; it should not have been published in that form,” a grisly editor’s note reads. (NYT) | Times spokesperson Eileen Murphy told Ravi Somaiya “editors have dealt with Carol on the issue.” (NYT) | “It seems to me that there can be little dispute about the claim,” Times Public Editor Margaret Sullivan wrote Wednesday. “Anyone can see the similarity.” (NYT)
  2. E.W. Scripps Co. and Journal Communications will combine broadcast properties, spin off newspapers: The companies “are so similar and share the deep commitment to public service through enterprise journalism,” Scripps Chairman Richard A.
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Here’s the storyline behind The Washington Post’s Storyline

When Washington Post Executive Editor Marty Baron congratulated the team of writers and editors behind Storyline after its launch Tuesday morning, he was addressing journalists who’d been spending a lot of time at work.

Some members of the team were in the office until 9 p.m. Monday night making final preparations. Jim Tankersley, the site’s editor, got in the office at 6:30 a.m. Tuesday.

“It’s fair to say that we worked many a night and weekend to get this where it is,” Tankersley said.

The site, which aims to answer big questions about public policy, bears some similarities to initiatives like FiveThirtyEight, The Upshot, QED and Vox, which was founded by Post alumnus Ezra Klein. This morning, Michael Calderone wrote in The Huffington Post wrote that the site was another salvo in the continuing “wonk wars.”

But what distinguishes Storyline from these other explanatory sites, Tankersley said, is its ambition to put public policy questions into context with powerful personal stories.… Read more

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Earns Gannett

Circulation revenue rises at Gannett’s local papers

Good morning. Here are 10 (OK, perhaps slightly more than 10) media stories.

  1. Gannett had a good second quarter: Broadcast revenue was “almost 88 percent higher in the quarter compared to the second quarter last year.” Publishing advertising revenue fell about 5 percent; circulation was roughly flat, and “At local domestic publishing sites, home delivery circulation revenue was up in the quarter due, in part, to strategic pricing actions associated with enhanced content.” (Gannett)
  2. Washington Post fights the “wonk wars”: The Washington Post’s new “Storyline” project is “dedicated to the power of stories to help us understand complicated, critical things,” Editor Jim Tankersley writes. (The Washington Post) | Michael Calderone takes a look: “It’s unlikely The Post would’ve launched a project like Storyline a few years ago.” (HuffPost) | Tankersley writes that as a college student he was inspired by Richard Read‘s 1998 series about french fries: “Those stories brought the crisis home in a way no textbook or straight news piece could, because at each step, they showed how global trends touched people’s lives and livelihoods.” (The Oregonian)
  3. Why corrupt politicians should avoid Vermont: Vermont has the best-covered legislature in the country, and California has the worst, Pew finds.
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White House criticizes Washington Post’s use of anonymous sources

In a briefing Monday, White House press secretary Josh Earnest criticized a Washington Post story for relying on anonymous sources. According to a transcript of the briefing, McClatchy reporter Anita Kumar pushed back at Earnest, noting that the Post didn’t have anyone at the briefing to defend the story.

“I noticed that, too,” Earnest said.

Earnest later allowed that there were people on the record in the story, which says White House aides knew a year ago that a crisis was developing on the U.S.-Mexico border, but they instead “focused much of their attention on political battles, such as Obama’s 2012 reelection campaign and the push to win congressional support for a broad immigration overhaul, that would have been made more difficult with the addition of a high-profile border crisis.”

“[Y]ou criticize anonymous sources, but we have anonymous sources from you all every day,” Kumar said.… Read more

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