Articles about "The Washington Post"


White House criticizes Washington Post’s use of anonymous sources

In a briefing Monday, White House press secretary Josh Earnest criticized a Washington Post story for relying on anonymous sources. According to a transcript of the briefing, McClatchy reporter Anita Kumar pushed back at Earnest, noting that the Post didn’t have anyone at the briefing to defend the story.

“I noticed that, too,” Earnest said.

Earnest later allowed that there were people on the record in the story, which says White House aides knew a year ago that a crisis was developing on the U.S.-Mexico border, but they instead “focused much of their attention on political battles, such as Obama’s 2012 reelection campaign and the push to win congressional support for a broad immigration overhaul, that would have been made more difficult with the addition of a high-profile border crisis.”

“[Y]ou criticize anonymous sources, but we have anonymous sources from you all every day,” Kumar said.… Read more

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Jill Abramson doesn’t return NYT’s email

Good morning. Almost there. Let’s go.… Read more

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Journalist on learning for herself: ‘poverty is a circumstance, not a value judgement’

The Washington Post

Darlena Cunha wrote Tuesday about finding herself driving a Mercedes to pick up food stamps. Cunha wrote about a series of big changes in her life for The Washington Post.

In 2007, Cunha took a new job as a producer in Boston. The following year, she discovered she was pregnant with twins. Then, the recession hit.

The weeks flew by. My boyfriend proposed, and we bought a house. Then, just three weeks after we closed, the market crashed. The house we’d paid $240,000 for was suddenly worth $150,000. It was okay, though — we were still making enough money to cover the exorbitant mortgage payments. Then we weren’t.

Now, Cunha is a freelance journalist who blogs at parentwin.com and has written for The Huffington Post, among other places.… Read more

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Former Washington Post owner offers art collection to employees

The Washington Post

Graham Holdings Company will sell its art collection at reduced prices to Washington Post employees, Philip Kennicott reports. Graham Holdings is the new name of the company that sold the Post to Jeff Bezos last year.

Proceeds from the sale will go to TheDream.US, “a scholarship fund founded by Donald Graham to help undocumented students,” Kennicott writes.

Graham Holdings is moving out of the Washington Post building next month to a space with “very few walls,” GraHoCo spokesperson Rima Calderon tells Kennicott.

The collection “is much like the family: Unflashy and deeply local in its focus,” Kennicott writes.

Artists associated with the Washington Color school—Sam Gilliam, Jacob Kainen, Gene Davis, Thomas Downing, among others—are well represented, as are national figures such as Alex Katz, whose work was originally in the Newsweek corporate collection in New York.

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Editor fired for Reddit shenanigans, BuzzFeed editors don’t shout

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories for the day before your long weekend. And from Sam Kirkland, your daily digital stories.

  1. Editor fired for gaming Reddit: Rod “Slasher” Breslau was fired from CBS Interactive’s esports site OnGamers after he was “caught asking other users to post his stories to Reddit with specific headlines,” Patrick Howell O’Neill reports. Reddit has banned OnGamers as a result, resulting in a loss of half its traffic. (The Daily Dot) || Related: How to get your news site banned from Reddit (Poynter)
  2. These media companies drug-test their employees: The Washington Post, The New York Times and McClatchy all want you to fill a cup. (Gawker)
  3. Voice of America journalists don’t want to be mouthpieces: Their union endorsed a change to the organization’s charter that would require VOA to “actively support American policy,” Ron Nixon reports.
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A photo taken on board a helicopter shows a US State Department helicopter flying over the Iraqi capital Baghdad carrying US Secretary of State John Kerry Monday, June 23, 2014. Kerry pledged "intense" support for Iraq against the "existential threat" of a major militant offensive pushing toward Baghdad from the north and west. (AP Photo/Brendan Smialowski, Pool)

After shuttering bureaus, news organizations revisit Iraq

When New York Times reporter Tim Arango arrived in Iraq in 2010, the eight-bedroom bureau was so crowded that he had to sleep on the couch.

But about two years later, he frequently found himself wandering the halls alone. Occasionally, journalists would come in and share the house, making Arango, by then the Times’ Baghdad bureau chief, feel “kind of like a bed and breakfast owner.”

When American troops left Iraq in 2011, many reporters went with them, he said. Some went back stateside, and some soon found themselves covering the Arab Spring uprising throughout the Middle East.

“I think there was a period where the reading public and the media moved on,” Arango said. He’s currently reporting from northern Iraq.

Now, with an insurgency threatening the Iraqi government and 300 United States advisors committed to halting their advance, the country has seen a sudden infusion of reporters from American news organizations, many that closed their bureaus shortly before or after the war ended.… Read more

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Can the NYT, WaPo and Mozilla create a system to quiet the trolls in your comments?

The Washington Post

A partnership between the New York Times, the Washington Post and Mozilla aims to create a commenting system to address the nasty status quo in Web comments, where there’s an “incentive to be the loudest voice.”

“The two-year development project will be funded by a $3.89 million grant from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation,” Paul Farhi writes in the Post.

The Web desperately needs a solution to the vexing problem of commenting. Chicago Sun-Times managing editor Craig Newman called his site’s comment section a “morass of negativity, racism, and hate speech” when that paper (where I used to work) eliminated it in April.

Some would-be solutions, like YouTube requiring a Google+ login to comment and the Huffington Post requiring a Facebook login, have infuriated commenters who are fiercely protective of their anonymity.… Read more

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WaPo editor: ‘Stop taking lovers’ headline ‘distracted people’ from taking article seriously

The headline changed on an article by W. Bradford Wilcox and Robin Fretwell Wilson in The Washington Post’s new PostEverything section:

How did that headline make it on top of the article in the first place?

“I think the headline we originally put on the piece distracted people from taking seriously a raft of social science that the authors discuss,” PostEverything Editor Adam Kushner told Poynter in an email. “That was my bad. Regarding the substance of the piece, we’ve said from the beginning—as you reported—that PostEverything is dedicated to publishing a wide range of perspectives about issues in politics and culture.”

PostEverything launched in late May; at the time Kushner told me it would tackle stories “The Washington Post is not necessarily currently equipped to service” and that he planned to hit up ““wonderful thinkers and writers across the academy, across various fields where they’re practitioners” for stories.… Read more

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Washington Post sends bad speller to cover Spelling Bee

The Washington Post

The Washington Post’s “assistant managing editor for humiliation” assigned Steve Hendrix to cover the Scripps National Spelling Bee. “I read millions of words a year, write them by the thousands and still misspell at a clip of about a clunker per line,” Hendrix writes. He says he was once “invited to a neurology lab at Yale University” because “Scientists wanted to know how a professional writer who adores words can be so completely awful at spelling them.”

Hendrix promises to send “dangerously spelled dispatches from the auditorium” at the Scripps Bee, whose preliminary rounds began Wednesday. Perhaps mercifully, Hendrix has thus far refrained from tweeting about the event.… Read more

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New Washington Post opinion venture: ‘This is not a Beltway publication’

The Washington Post plans to launch a new digital opinion venture called PostEverything Wednesday.

In an interview, its editor, Adam Kushner, said the new project would mostly seek contributors from outside the Post for what he said he hopes “will look a lot like a digital daily magazine” covering national politics and foreign policy as well as sports and entertainment. He’s looking for regular contributors as well as one-offs from people itching to blast their thoughts into the “universe of ideas.”

PostEverything will tackle stories that “The Washington Post is not necessarily currently equipped to service,” Kushner said. By way of example: “OK, we’ve just discovered a new apocryphal Gospel in which Jesus had a wife,” he posited. The response: “Let’s go call Reza Aslan and ask him to make an argument that this is totally in keeping with everything we know about the guy.… Read more

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