Articles about "The Washington Post"


Washington Post sends bad speller to cover Spelling Bee

The Washington Post

The Washington Post’s “assistant managing editor for humiliation” assigned Steve Hendrix to cover the Scripps National Spelling Bee. “I read millions of words a year, write them by the thousands and still misspell at a clip of about a clunker per line,” Hendrix writes. He says he was once “invited to a neurology lab at Yale University” because “Scientists wanted to know how a professional writer who adores words can be so completely awful at spelling them.”

Hendrix promises to send “dangerously spelled dispatches from the auditorium” at the Scripps Bee, whose preliminary rounds began Wednesday. Perhaps mercifully, Hendrix has thus far refrained from tweeting about the event.… Read more

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New Washington Post opinion venture: ‘This is not a Beltway publication’

The Washington Post plans to launch a new digital opinion venture called PostEverything Wednesday.

In an interview, its editor, Adam Kushner, said the new project would mostly seek contributors from outside the Post for what he said he hopes “will look a lot like a digital daily magazine” covering national politics and foreign policy as well as sports and entertainment. He’s looking for regular contributors as well as one-offs from people itching to blast their thoughts into the “universe of ideas.”

PostEverything will tackle stories that “The Washington Post is not necessarily currently equipped to service,” Kushner said. By way of example: “OK, we’ve just discovered a new apocryphal Gospel in which Jesus had a wife,” he posited. The response: “Let’s go call Reza Aslan and ask him to make an argument that this is totally in keeping with everything we know about the guy.… Read more

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Want to break your own media news? Don’t tell anyone in the newsroom anything!

The news that Jill Abramson was being replaced as New York Times executive editor “was tightly held within the gossipy confines of the Times newsroom,” Erik Wemple reports in The Washington Post. “It was only after the meeting among top editors had convened that the New York Times communications department informed the paper’s own reporters that a management change was underway, according to a source at the paper. That was about a half-hour before the official announcement.”

Nevertheless, news of Abramson’s ouster hit Politico with the same timestamp as the Times Co. email announcing the change.

Dylan Byers, the Politico reporter who reported the Abramson news, didn’t want to disclose his sources when reached by email. But the Times kept an admirably deathlike grip on the news, considering its large population of individuals who are among the least likely people on this planet to sit on juicy gossip: journalists.… Read more

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FILE - In this March 12, 2004 file photo, former New York Times reporter, Jayson Blair speaks to an audience in New York's Harlem neighborhood. After the plagiary scandal, Blair has been working as a life coach in northern Va. since 2007. The ex-New York Times reporter best known for fabricating and plagiarizing says his experience hitting the lows helps him relate to people, and the respected psychologist who hired him into his practice agrees: "Jayson is now using his talents for good." (AP Photo/Jennifer Szymaszek, File)

Washington Post was ambivalent about Jayson Blair story at first

The Washington Post

Washington Post reporter Manuel Roig-Franzia writes that when he discovered New York Times reporter Jayson Blair had plagiarized from a San Antonio Express-News article, “I called the national desk at The Post and suggested we write about what appeared to be an egregious case of plagiarism.” He “didn’t relish the idea of doing a gotcha piece about another journalist. For years, I felt so conflicted about the events that took place on that reporting trip that I seldom mentioned my small, early role in what became a major scandal.”

Roig-Franzia says the Post’s first reaction was “Meh.” After he met with Macarena Hernandez, who wrote the Express-News story, he decided to try again:

I made another call, and this time my editor, Daniel LeDuc — who also felt strongly that The Post should write about the plagiarism — took printouts of the two stories directly to Leonard Downie Jr., the paper’s executive editor.

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Robin Givhan is not returning to The Washington Post she left

The Washington Post is a different news organization than the one she left in 2011 for The Daily Beast, Robin Givhan said in a phone call with Poynter. The Post announced Tuesday that Givhan was rejoining it as its fashion critic. “It’s not as if there was something pushing me out the door,” she said of her former and now future employer. “It was more that something else was enticing and luring me.”

Givhan’s Daily Beast gig didn’t last very long — she was laid off at the end of 2012 as the Newsweek/Daily Beast marriage foundered — but she said the opportunity to work for a digital-first outlet gave her “a really good understanding of how to engage with readers in a more intimate way.” She also appreciated the ability to work quickly: “That almost instant but really satisfying gratification of seeing something get out there fast and not only reflect the conversation that’s going on, but also help direct and further the conversation, I think that’s one of the great things about being able to do stuff on the Web.”

Robin Givhan, right, with Sally Quinn in 2007.
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Don’t post your passwords in Washington Post comments section

The Washington Post

I couldn’t give a flying fig about the Heartbleed thingamajig,” a commenter posted on a Brian Fung story in The Washington Post. He posted his passwords and welcomed others to:

read all the eMail I have. Sneak into my WaPo, NYT or CNN accounts and go crazy making comments in my name. Break-into my Facebook or Twitter profiles and change my hometown to Gas City Indiana, swap-out my avatar with a picture of your nads, make friends with people I don’t know.

Guess what happened next.

“It’s possible that this is a hoax,” Fung allows. (Fung couldn’t get in touch with the person, and he tells Poynter in an email that the Post removed his comment.) “But the lesson is no less valid: Share your credentials online, and you won’t have to worry about getting hacked — you’ll have done all the hard work for the criminals.”… Read more

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Eli Saslow thanks his sources for their ‘huge act of courage’

The Washington Post

Speaking to The Washington Post newsroom after he won a Pulitzer Prize for explanatory reporting Monday, reporter Eli Saslow said that a friend had told him, “Oh Pulitzer Prize winner, now I know the first three words of your obituary.”

Saslow saluted colleagues, editors and the Post itself. Referring to former owner Don Graham, Saslow said he’s excited about its new ownership but is “so, so grateful that if I was ever going to get lucky enough to win one of these things that some of the stories were published when it was Don’s paper.” Saslow also talked about the people “I owe the most to”: His sources.

They’re the ones who take the huge risk. It’s a huge act of courage to have somebody call, who you don’t know, from out of town, and say that they want to come be with you constantly in sort of, you know, every corner of your life in this moment where things are usually not going well and there’s a lot at stake.

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Gellman: Baron’s editing ‘made me feel like it was still The Washington Post I’d grown up with’

Bart Gellman is by no means done with reporting on the NSA. His stories for The Washington Post won a Public Service Pulitzer today, a prize he and collaborators, including Ashkan Soltani and Laura Poitras, shared with The Guardian for their reporting on Edward Snowden’s revelations. “Look, there are more great stories to do, and I have a book to write, so I will be on this subject for time to come,” Gellman said by phone.

Gellman speaks to The Washington Post newsroom after the Pulitzer announcement Monday. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Gellman speaks to The Washington Post newsroom after the Pulitzer announcement Monday.

Asked whether he’d changed his methodology in the course of reporting these stories, Gellman said “I’ve had to become much more careful to protect my reporting materials and my confidential sources.” Whereas he used to worry about keeping stuff only from the U.S.… Read more

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Washington Post shuts down ServiceAlley

ServiceAlley, a Washington Post site that provided directories and reviews of tradespeople and home services, will shut down April 18, and its apps will go dark this weekend. An email went out to ServiceAlley customers advising them to print out deals they’d purchased through the site:

These vouchers are agreements with the merchant, so the merchant is obligated to honor the voucher until the expiration date on the voucher. After that point, the merchant is obligated to honor the purchase value of the voucher for up to 5 years from the purchase date.

The Post launched ServiceAlley in 2011, calling it “something Washingtonians need.”

“Service Alley was a great product, but ultimately we decided to focus on initiatives with the potential for greater scale,” Post spokesperson Kris Coratti tells Poynter in an email.… Read more

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Washington Post’s possible new HQ has a Dan Brown connection

The Washington Post signed a letter of intent to move to new headquarters, Jonathan O’Connell reported on Twitter Tuesday:

 

The building is on D.C.’s Franklin Square, which figures prominently in Dan Brown’s 2009 novel “The Lost Symbol.” (The Almas Shriners are based there, too.) I purchased a copy of the book to see if any startling connections exist between the Post’s potential new home and the shadowy world symbologist Robert Langdon and CIA Office of Security Director Inoue Sato investigate in the novel.

Chapter 90:

Langdon shook his head. He knew Franklin Square was one of the older sections of Washington, but he wasn’t familiar with the address.

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