Articles about "The Washington Post"


Regional-paper readers really like getting Washington Post content with their subscriptions

This spring, the Washington Post launched a program that let subscribers to partner newspapers access its paywalled content. 165 have signed up so far.

New research the Post’s research and analytics team conducted (you can read it below) suggests the partnerships have benefited both parties: Almost two thirds of subscribers of partner newspapers “report that they are much more or more likely to continue their print subscription for the next six months because free access to The Washington Post website and apps is a benefit of their subscription,” one slide says.

About 1,300 subscribers to the partner papers who had activated their free subscriptions completed the survey this past summer. The Post invited these readers at random, across all the partner papers.

“We had a belief it would do this but you never know till you get the research back,” Post President and General Manager Stephen Hills said in a phone call.

People who work at some of the Post’s partner papers back up the findings: “Out of the gate, the Washington Post program has been an unqualified success, with really remarkable uptake from subscribers on very little promotion,” Steve Yaeger, the (Minneapolis) Star Tribune’s vice president for marketing and PR, told Poynter.

Tom Zeller, The (Toledo, Ohio) Blade’s audience development manager, said his paper had a “pretty aggressive home delivery price increase this year,” Zeller said, “and we looked at this as something to add value.”

Since the program kicked off, he said, “our price-related stops have been a little bit lower.” The Blade has seen a lot of conversions, and it has also used the program to promote its own digital efforts, he said.

The survey asked respondents what topics they found interesting: 71 percent said national news (excluding politics), 67 percent said international news and 64 percent said national politics. All are subject areas in which many regional newspapers have made cutbacks in recent years. “That’s why the pitch that I made when presenting this to people in the business was that they are providing local content that consumers can’t get elsewhere,” Hills said. “Our national reporting is a natural complement to what their papers are doing.”

“I feel for a regional paper, The Blade has pretty strong national and international coverage,” Zeller said. “It’s not like we have a hole there,” he said, but the program “augmented it by adding very high quality journalism.”

The relationship is unlubricated by cash: “No money changes hands,” Hills said. “What we’re doing it for is to get the promotion and increase the national exposure of The Washington Post.”

It also helps the Post in its ambitions to be a more national outlet. “I think at the macro level it helps as we become more known for this, and as we expand our national footprint,” Hills said. And the program “has opened the possibility of talking about lots of different ways we could partner” with other outlets, he said.

Washington Post Digital Partner Program research

Related: The Newsonomics of the Washington Post and New York Times Network Wars (Newsonomics) Read more

Tools:
0 Comments
bitcoinfeatured

Dorian Nakamoto looks to sue Newsweek over Bitcoin story

mediawiremorningHey, hi. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Lawsuit over Newsweek’s Bitcoin story? The man who Newsweek’s Leah McGrath Goodman identified as the founder of Bitcoin is raising money on a website to sue the magazine, claiming he was “targeted and victimized by a reckless news organization.” Dorian Nakamoto has been unemployed for 10 years, the site says. “Donations, obviously, can be made by bitcoin.” (TechCrunch) | Previously: In March, Nakamoto told the AP he hadn’t heard of Bitcoin until his son told him about it after talking to Newsweek: “I got nothing to do with it.” (Poynter)
  2. Snyderman sorry for violating Ebola quarantine: The 21-day quarantine for NBC News crew members who traveled to Liberia is now mandatory after Dr. Nancy Snyderman violated the voluntary quarantine. “As a health professional I know that we have no symptoms and pose no risk to the public, but I am deeply sorry for the concerns this episode caused.” (THR) | The freelance cameraman who contracted Ebola and is recovering, Ashoka Mukpo, tweeted his “endless gratitude for the good vibes.” (NBC News) | Ebola-related: The New York Post fronts the Dallas nurse who contracted Ebola — and her dog. (New York Post) | Bentley “is being held in isolation and watched closely, but it is unlikely that he will have to be euthanized, Dallas city officials said.” (Mashable)
     


     

  3. Christie and Clinton overkill? Since Jan. 1, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie was been the most-mentioned potential Republican presidential contender, according to a LexisNexis search of 15 top newspapers, with Mitt Romney, Ted Cruz and Rand Paul not far behind. Hillary Clinton, of course, is the most-referenced Democrat — and it’s not close at all. “Overall, more stories have talked about potential GOP candidates (202) than Democratic ones (115).” (Pew Research Center)
  4. Kushner no longer OC Register’s publisher: New publisher and CEO Richard Mirman takes over for the beleaguered Aaron Kushner, who remains CEO of Freedom Communications, which owns the newspaper. Mirman is an investor in the Register. (Orange County Register) | Previously: The Los Angeles Register closed last month after just five months of operation (Poynter), and the Register reportedly owes the Los Angeles Times $3.5 million in distribution fees. (OC Weekly)
  5. Rift between Guardian and NYT? When The Guardian’s hard drives were being smashed by British authorities in 2013, the newspaper arranged for The New York Times to share and protect some of its Snowden documents. But now, Lloyd Grove reports, some Times editors are frustrated with The Guardian’s “total control over the Snowden cache, including how and when it can be used to develop, pursue and publish investigations.” Counters Times executive editor Dean Baquet: “I don’t feel held captive by The Guardian, because I wouldn’t have access to these particular documents without The Guardian.” (The Daily Beast)
  6. White House’s Secret Service spin: “White House reporters are often too swamped to fully check out every assertion made by the White House’s press operation, and in this case officials seized on a phrase that is in the report. The report is rather complicated and someone reading quickly might not catch the nuance that this was not actually a finding, but merely a claim made by, among others, by the very person whose credibility is questioned throughout the report.” (Washington Post)
  7. BBC looks at “hybrid” broadcast-Internet radio on phones: “Nearly two thirds of the mobile phone owners surveyed found the idea of hybrid radio appealing and said it could be a deciding factor when faced with a choice between phones with similar specs.” (BBC)
  8. Not front page of the day: A story on A1 of some editions of The New York Times today is missing a byline and lede.
     


     

  9. Front page of the day, curated by Kristen Hare: Times-Journal of Fort Payne, Alabama, with a very not-lifesize picture of Ebola (Courtesy the Newseum).
     
    AL_TJ
     
  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Betsy Woodruff will be a politics writer for Slate. She’s currently a politics writer at the Washington Examiner. ‏(@woodruffbets) | Carlos Lozada will be a nonfiction book critic at The Washington Post. Previously, he edited Outlook there. (Washington Post) | Josef Federman is now Jerusalem bureau chief for The Associated Press. Previously, he was a news editor at the AP. (AP) | Chris Carter is now digital services sales director for The Alliance for Audited Media. Previously, he was director of business development for DG Interactive. (AAM) | Job of the day: The Associated Press is looking for a photo editor. Get your résumés in! (AP) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would you like this roundup sent to you each morning? Please email abeaujon@poynter.org. Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

David Plotz now CEO of Atlas Obscura

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • Jonah Freedman is now editor-in-chief of StubHub. Previously, he was managing editor of MLSsoccer.com. (Pando Daily)
  • David Plotz is now CEO of Atlas Obscura. Previously, he was editor of Slate (Washington Post)
  • Brie Dyas is now senior work life editor at The Huffington Post. Previously, she was executive home editor there. (The Huffington Post)
  • Jordan Chariton will be New York media editor at The Wrap. He’s editor of TVNewser. Mark Joyella will be a co-editor for TV Spy and TVNewser. Previously, he was a TV editor at Mediaite. Brian Flood is now co-editor of TVNewser. Previously, he had written for Sports Illustrated and RotoExperts. (TV Newser)

Job of the day: WBEZ is looking for a midday anchor. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs)

Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

Former Time Inc. CTO joins magazine startup

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • Frédéric Michel will be a consultant for Sky Italia. He is Telefónica’s Europe director of public affairs and communication. (The Guardian)
  • Bob Mason is now vice president of hosting at NewsCycle Solutions. Previously, he was chief technology officer at Digital First Media. (Poynter)
  • Gregg Doyel is now a sports columnist at The Indianapolis Star. Previously, he was a columnist at CBSSports.com. (The Indianapolis Star)
  • Mike Stamm is now a senior design technologist at The Washington Post. Previously, he led design technology at The Wall Street Journal. Jessie Tseng is an interaction designer at The Washington Post. Previously, she was a user experience designer at Adaptly. (The Washington Post)
  • Sheena Lyonnais will be a freelance writer. Previously, she was managing editor of Yonge Street Media. (Yonge Street Media)
  • Susi Park is general manager of advertising for GQ. Previously, she was assistant general manager of advertising at Wired. (Email)
  • Abe Cytryn is now chief technology officer for Magzter. Previously, he was chief technology officer at Time Inc. (Email)

Job of the day: The Washington Post is looking for a religion writer. Get your résumés in! (The Washington Post)

Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

Men’s Health demonstrates how not to talk about sports with anyone

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. CNN will cut 300 jobs: About 130 people have taken buyouts, and 170 more will be laid off, Brian Stelter reports. Parent Turner Broadcasting plans to lay off 1,475 people. (CNN) | “Turner said it was adding 150 employees in growth areas.” (NYT)
  2. How not to talk about sports with anyone: Men’s Health tweeted an image of a woman holding a foam finger under the legend “How to Talk about Sports with Women.” The link led to a slight Teresa Sabga story called “The Secret to Talking Sports with Any Woman.” The mag apologized on Twitter: “It missed the mark and the negative feedback is justified. We’ve deleted it.” (@MensHealthMag) | A brief selection of reactions: “is this a joke?” (@AishaS) | “hi @MensHealthMag, you don’t know me, but i run @ESPNMag’s annual analytics issue. also, i have a vagina!” (@megreenwell) | “The article (article?) itself is 100 words of non-advice.” (The Daily Dot)
  3. College rescinds George Will’s speaking engagement: Scripps College uninvited Will from speaking at the all-women school. Will wrote a stupid column about sexual assault earlier this year. “They didn’t say that the column was the reason, but it was the reason,” Will told Brad Richardson. He was due to speak at the Elizabeth Hubert Malott Public Affairs Program, which aims to “bring speakers to campus whose political views differ from the majority of students.” (The Claremont Independent) | The St. Louis Post-Dispatch dumped Will’s column last June. “The column was offensive and inaccurate; we apologize for publishing it,” Tony Messenger wrote. (St. Louis Post-Dispatch) | An all-male cast of editors handled the column. (WP)
  4. L.A. Times says Aaron Kushner owes it millions: It stopped delivering the Orange County Register (and the now-shuttered Los Angeles Register) in L.A., telling Gustavo Arellano the Register “has, for more than a year and a half, been consistently late in paying money it owes The Times for services rendered.” (OC Weekly) | “The shame about the U.S. economy in the 2000s is that it’s been marked by a dearth of Aaron Kushners.” (Forbes)
  5. Scammers target Denver Post subscribers: “The notices offer one-year renewals to The Denver Post for the low, low price of only $489.95, which equates to 410 percent more than the actual current amount for The Post’s All Access Plus digital replica subscription and about 71 percent more than a new seven-day print subscription.” (The Denver Post) | Subscribers of several McClatchy papers, including The Sacramento Bee and the Charlotte Observer, have also been hit. (Sac Bee) | OOF: “Criminals should get -30- to life.” (@jfdulac)
  6. Amazon will help spread Washington Post content: A Kindle app, free for those who buy a certain model and paid for those who buy others, “will offer a curated selection of news and photographs from the daily newspaper in a magazine-style, tablet-friendly format.” (Bloomberg Businessweek) | “[I]f it increases the Post‘s reach (either for readers or advertisers, or both) and it doesn’t cost Amazon or Bezos too much, then it is a slam-dunk.” (Gigaom) | “Honest question: How many of you are listening to U2’s new album because Apple forced it into your iTunes library?” (@dylanbyers) | (Honest answer: I gave it many chances but still can’t recall most of the songs.) | Marginally related: Margaret Sullivan looked at whether NYT has covered Amazon v. Hachette fairly. (NYT) | FLASHBACK: Times reporter David Streitfeld on Amazon: “They don’t care if they’re liked, or even if they’re understood. That makes them challenging to write about.” (Poynter)
  7. Lessons from The New Yorker’s Web redesign: “Right on down to the font choice and page breaks, every decision we made, we first asked ourselves, ‘How will this affect whether or not people will read a story from beginning to the end?’” NewYorker.com Editor Nicholas Thompson tells John Brownlee. (Fast Company)
  8. A meh-moir: An oral history of the NYT’s Meh List. “[N]o one lived it like Mark Leibovich, who developed a sixth sense for meh.” By Samantha Henig, with additional reporting and user experience by Jon Kelly. (Poynter)
  9. Front page of the day, curated by Kristen Hare: The Asheville (North Carolina) Citizen-Times greets autumn, beautifully. (Courtesy the Newseum.)

    asheville-10072014 

  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: David Gillen is now executive editor of news enterprise at Bloomberg News. Previously, he was deputy business editor of enterprise at The New York Times. (Politico) | Loren Mayor is now chief operating officer for NPR. Previously, she was senior vice president of strategy there. (Poynter) | Mike Grunwald will be a senior staff writer at Politico magazine. He is a senior national correspondent for Time magazine. (Playbook) | Weston Phippen is now a reporter for the National Journal. Previously, he was a staff writer at the Tampa Bay Times. Lauren Fox will be a Congress reporter at the National Journal. Previously, she was a political reporter at U.S. News and World Report. (Email) | Mark Brackenbury has been named executive editor for the Connecticut Group at Digital First Media. He is managing editor for the New Haven Register. (New Haven Register) | Colleen Noonan has been named vice president of marketing and creative service for the New York Daily News. Previously, she was a digital media and marketing consultant at Pitney Bowes. Melanie Schnuriger is now vice president of product development for the New York Daily News. Previously, she was general manager of fashion and beauty for Hearst Digital Media. Kristen Lee is director of digital development for the New York Daily News. Previously, she was digital integration editor there. Brad Gerick is now director of social media for the New York Daily News. He has been social media manager and regional editor for Patch.com. Zach Haberman is now deputy managing editor for digital at the New York Daily News. Previously, he was digital news editor there. Cristina Everett is now deputy managing editor for digital entertainment at the New York Daily News. Previously, she was senior digital entertainment editor there. Andy Clayton is now deputy managing editor for digital sports at the New York Daily News. Previously, he was senior online sports editor there. Christine Roberts is mobile and emerging products editor at the New York Daily News. Previously, she was an associate homepage editor there. (Email) | Job of the day: BuzzFeed is looking for a National LGBT Reporter. Get your résumés in! (BuzzFeed) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org
    Suggestions? Criticisms? Would like me to send you this roundup each morning? Please email me: abeaujon@poynter.org.
Read more
Tools:
0 Comments

Career Beat: Politico gets new executive editor

Good morning! Here are some job updates from the journalism community:

  • Dave Cohn will take a job at a broadcast network. Previously, he was chief content officer for Circa. (Poynter)
  • Chris Mooney will start an environmental blog at The Washington Post. Previously, he was a correspondent for Mother Jones. (Washington Post)
  • Dodai Stewart will be director of culture coverage at Fusion. Previously, she was deputy editor at Jezebel. (Jezebel)
  • Taffy Brodesser-Akner is now a correspondent for GQ. She has written for The New York Times Magazine, New York magazine and Playboy. (Email)
  • Jonathan Shorman will be a statehouse reporter at the Topeka (Kansas) Capital-Journal. Previously, he was a reporter for the Springfield (Missouri) News-Leader. (News-Leader)
  • David la Spina is now a photo editor for The New York Times Magazine. He has taught photography at Simon’s Rock College. Taffy Brodesser-Akner is a contributor at The New York Times Magazine. She has written for The New York Times Magazine, New York magazine and Playboy. Gideon Lewis-Kraus is a contributor at The New York Times Magazine. He has written for Harper’s, Wired and GQ. (New York Times Magazine)
  • Peter Canellos is now executive editor at Politico. Previously, he had been editorial page editor at The Boston Globe. (Politico)
  • Renee Rupcich is design director for Nylon and NylonGuys. Previously, she was senior art director of the Condé Nast Media Group. (Email)

Vice Media is looking for a news video editor. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs)

Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org Read more

Tools:
0 Comments
Jason Rezaian, Yeganeh Salehi

Iran frees one journalist

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Iran frees one journalist: Yeganeh Salehi is out of jail, but her husband, Washington Post Tehran bureau chief Jason Rezaian, remains in custody. They were arrested July 22. (WP)
  2. NBC News freelancer arrives in U.S. for Ebola treatment: Ashoka Mukpo is on his way to Omaha. (NBC News)
  3. Another view of The Washington Post under Jeff Bezos: “Only a nitwit would root against the health of the daily newspaper in the nation’s capital,” writes David Carr, who says that Executive Editor Marty Baron‘s paper “is in the middle of a great run, turning out the kind of reporting that journalists — and readers — live for.” (NYT) | The Post set a traffic record in September. (Capital) | Last week Politico wrote that the Post’s new regime had produced “no major digital innovation, no radical new product launch, no change to delivery or presentation, and no promise of any specific plans for the future.” (Politico)
  4. Turkish police fire tear gas at BBC crew: “It had been fired from no more than 10 feet away and could easily have killed anyone it hit.” (BBC News)
  5. Welcome, Bloomberg Politics: The new publication launched Sunday. Its TV show, “With All Due Respect,” bows tonight. | “On the landing page featured pieces are distinctly numbered from one to seven” — hey, wait a minute! (Politico)
  6. FCC slows review of Comcast-Time Warner merger: The agency “cites recent filings submitted by Comcast stating that its acquisition of NBCUniversal has not led to higher prices for NBC national networks and local TV stations, an outcome that runs counter to the FCC’s own analysis.” (Forbes) | “Comcast says that this pause is not necessarily a sign of trouble and that it tends to occur in large transactions.” (The Verge)
  7. British police used anti-terror laws to get newspaper’s call records: The Crown Prosecution Service asked Mail on Sunday for records about its sources for a story about Chris Huhne, a cabinet minister who tried to get out of a speeding ticket. When it refused, police used the country’s Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act and “trawled through thousands of confidential numbers called by journalists from a landline at the busy newsdesk going back an entire year, covering hundreds of stories unrelated to the Huhne case. (Mail on Sunday)
  8. Gary Hart revisited, revisited: Boston University j-school honcho and former Miami Herald Executive Editor Tom Fiedler pushes back against a Matt Bai story that showed the Herald’s hunt for evidence of Sen. Gary Hart‘s infidelity couldn’t have been inspired by his now-famous challenge to the press. A week before the Herald article, Fiedler writes, Hart told him, “I’ve been in public life for 15 years and I think that if there was anything about my background that anybody had any information on, they would bring it forward. But they haven’t.” He also writes: “To me, the question that Bai and others raise shouldn’t be why the news media reported on Hart’s activities, but why it failed to report on FDR, JFK and LBJ.” (Politico)
  9. Matthew Rosenberg can return to Afghanistan: New Afghan president Ashraf Ghani reversed the NYT reporter’s expulsion Sunday. (NYT)
  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Dave Cohn will take a job at a broadcast network. Previously, he was chief content officer for Circa. (Poynter) | Chris Mooney will start an environmental blog at The Washington Post. Previously, he was a correspondent for Mother Jones. (Washington Post) | Dodai Stewart will be director of culture coverage at Fusion. Previously, she was deputy editor at Jezebel. (Jezebel) | Taffy Brodesser-Akner is now a correspondent for GQ. She has written for The New York Times Magazine, New York magazine and Playboy. (Email) | Jonathan Shorman will be a statehouse reporter at the Topeka (Kansas) Capital-Journal. Previously, he was a reporter for the Springfield (Missouri) News-Leader. (News-Leader) | David la Spina is now a photo editor for The New York Times Magazine. He has taught photography at Simon’s Rock College. Taffy Brodesser-Akner is a contributor at The New York Times Magazine. She has written for The New York Times Magazine, New York magazine and Playboy. Gideon Lewis-Kraus is a contributor at The New York Times Magazine. He has written for Harper’s, Wired and GQ. (New York Times Magazine) | Peter Canellos is now executive editor at Politico. Previously, he had been editorial page editor at The Boston Globe. (Politico) | Renee Rupcich is design director for Nylon and NylonGuys. Previously, she was senior art director of the Condé Nast Media Group. (Email) | Vice Media is looking for a news video editor. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would like me to send you this roundup each morning? Please email me: abeaujon@poynter.org. Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

Career Beat: Ali Watkins joins HuffPost Politics

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • Marjorie Powell is now vice president of human resources at NPR. Previously, she was chief human resources officer at the University of Maryland at Baltimore. (NPR)
  • Tim O’Shaughnessy is now president of Graham Holdings Company. Previously, he was CEO of LivingSocial. (GraHoCo)
  • Victor Caivano is now news director for The Associated Press’ “Southern Cone” countries — Argentina, Chile, Paraguay and Uruguay. Previously, he was a photojournalist there. (AP)
  • Ali Watkins will be a reporter at HuffPost Politics. Previously, she worked for McClatchy DC. (Email)
  • Zach Goldfarb will be policy editor at The Washington Post. Previously, he was a White House and economics correspondent there. (Washington Post)

Job of the day The Washington Post is hiring a video producer. Get your résumés in! (Wash Post PR)

Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org. Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

Career Beat: Tom Knudson joins Center for Investigative Reporting

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • Tom Knudson is now a senior reporter at The Center for Investigative Reporting. Previously he was a staff writer at The Sacramento Bee. (Center for Investigative Reporting)
  • Mark Smith will be mobile web editor for The Washington Post. Previously, he was senior manager of social media marketing at USA Today. (Washington Post)
  • Brian Gross will be deputy design director at The Washington Post. Currently, he’s lead senior designer there. Emmet Smith will be lead senior designer at The Washington Post. Previously, he was a senior designer there. (Washington Post)
  • Julia Cheiffetz is now executive editor at Dey Street Books. Previously, she was editorial director at Amazon. (@rachelsklar)
  • Stephen Collinson is now a senior enterprise reporter for CNN’s digital politics. Previously, he was a White House correspondent for Agence France-Presse. (Politico)
  • Matt Vella is now assistant managing editor at Time magazine. Previously, he was a senior editor at Fortune. Sam Jacobs is an assistant managing editor for Time magazine. Previously, he was a senior editor at Time. Kelly Conniff is now senior editor for special projects at Time magazine. Previously, she was a social media editor at Time. Mia Tramz is now multimedia editor at Time magazine. Previously, she was associate photo editor at Time Magazine. (Fishbowl NY)

Job of the day: The Idaho Statesman is looking for a breaking news reporter. Get your résumés in!

Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

Correction: A previous version of this story incorrectly said Tom Knudson was a Knight Fellow at Stanford University. In fact, he was the recipient of the Knight-Risser Prize for Western Environmental Reporting, which is sponsored by Knight. Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

Washington Post editor meets with Iranian president

Washington Post Executive Editor Martin Baron attended a meeting Tuesday morning with Iranian President Hassan Rouhani in New York, he confirms to Poynter in an email. They discussed Post reporter Jason Rezaian’s detention, Baron said, a conversation he later recounted in a Washington Post article.

“It was an on the record meeting with a couple dozen editors and reporters from most major news outlets,” New York Times Executive Editor Dean Baquet, who also attended, told Poynter. Wall Street Journal Editor-in-Chief Gerard Baker writes that Rouhani “declined to offer any new details on the arrest and incarceration of two journalists working for foreign newspapers who have been detained by Iranian authorities for the last two months.”

Rouhani “said the fate of Jason Rezaiain of the Washington Post and his wife, Yeganeh Salehi of Au-Dhabi-based newspaper, The National, lay in the hands of the Iranian judiciary, and suggested he was powerless to intervene,” Baker writes.

“I am not the judge of an individual who is being questioned by the judiciary at this point,” Baron reports Rouhani said. “The final judgment has not been rendered at this point.”

Iran has been holding Rezaian since July.

Rouhani will address the United Nations Wednesday.

John Daniszewski, the Associated Press’ senior managing editor for international news, attended as well, as did NBC News’ chief foreign affairs correspondent, Andrea Mitchell and Reuters Editor-in-Chief Stephen Adler. Read more

Tools:
0 Comments