Articles about "Time Inc."


American Freed Syria

American journalist released in Syria; British officials ID man believed to be Foley’s killer

Happy Monday. Andrew Beaujon is taking a much-deserved vacation. Here are some media stories.

  1. American journalist freed in Syria: On Sunday, UN peacekeepers received Peter Theo Curtis, who was kidnapped in 2012, and turned him over to the U.S. “According to German newspaper die Welt am Sonntag, ‘something was given in return for his release’.” Curtis was “reportedly held by the al-Nusra Front or by splinter groups allied with the al-Qaeda-affiliated group.” (Al Jazeera) | Previously: The U.S. declined to pay ransom for James Foley, who was killed by Islamic State militants last week. (Poynter)
  2. UK intel ID’s person believed to be Foley’s killer: And “sources have said that rampant media speculation about the identity of the killer may be off base.” (NBC News) | Medill professor Ellen Shearer on Foley’s return to the front lines: “Passion prevailed.
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Another executive leaves Condé Nast

The Wrap | Condé Nast

Condé Nast announced the departure of another member of its executive team Thursday, the third in the last two months.

Lou Cona, chief revenue officer of Condé Nast and president of Condé Nast Media Group, will be leaving the company, according to a press release. No reason was provided for his departure.… Read more

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Police Shooting Missouri

Where to buy gas masks for your reporting staff in Ferguson

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Who got arrested in Ferguson last night? Getty Images photographer Scott Olson. (Poynter) | Intercept reporter Ryan Devereaux (The Intercept) | Devereaux “was shot with rubber bullets/beanbags by police last night, spent night in jail. Is due to be released w/o charge soon.” (@the_intercept) | German reporters Ansgar Graw and Frank Hermann. (The Local) | “On Monday, The Washington Post, following the lead of other news organizations, began outfitting its employees with gas masks, purchased at a chain hardware store.” (WP) | Amazon has a pretty good selection of gas masks, some of which are eligible for Prime.
  2. St. Louis Post-Dispatch front page: “Streets Flare Up,” with stunning photo by David Carson (via Newseum) | Carson talked with Kristen Hare last week about covering the unrest in Ferguson.
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Tennessean-AP

Tennessean will use data, not ‘the journalist’s gut,’ to make decisions

Good morning. Here are 10 (ha ha, OK, you got me, it’s more than 10) media stories.

  1. 21st Century Fox won’t pursue Time Warner: Rupert Murdoch sent a honcho-to-honcho email to Jeffrey L. Bewkes Tuesday afternoon, notifying the Time Warner chief he was withdrawing his previous offer. (NYT) | “Arguably, shareholders had scuttled” the deal already, Brian Stelter writes: “21st Century Fox shares had dropped nearly 10% since the initial bid for Time Warner earlier this summer.” (CNN) | “Long media nerd earnings day. Was going to be fun. But now… [sad trombone]” (@pkafka) | “One large Fox investor said the market is worried about Murdoch’s discipline when it comes to deal-making,” Cristina Alesci reported Tuesday morning. (CNN) | Time Warner revenue was up 3 percent in the second quarter of 2014 over the same period the year before.
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Screen Shot 2014-07-21 at 12.06.04 PM

Time.com’s bounce rate down 15 percentage points since adopting continuous scroll

Three major news website redesigns this year look very different but have an important feature in common: articles that seamlessly transition to new content, without requiring readers to click or tap headlines and then wait for new pages to load.

This “continuous scroll” strategy for news sites’ article pages is gaining momentum. It’s been adopted by Time.com, NBCNews.com and LATimes.com, reflecting the fact that direct homepage traffic is waning (see the New York Times innovation report), and traffic from social media (particularly Facebook) just keeps growing.

So as readers increasingly enter sites from “side doors” or article pages, media organizations are trying to figure out how to get them to stick around. Pew recently found that visitors from Facebook are far less engaged than direct visitors.… Read more

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negative

Time clarifies: Ruined images in D-Day video were photo illustration

After two stories questioning the authenticity of what looked like ruined images in a video for Time, “Robert Capa’s Iconic D-Day Photo of a Soldier in the Surf,” Time has added photo illustration credits, Daniel Kile, vice president of communications for Time Inc., told Poynter in an email.

“TIME’s video and story have been updated to include a photo illustration credit. The film now includes a prominent label on the negatives and on the end credits (see attached for screen grabs). Our story has been updated to include an editor’s note about the change.”

A.D. Coleman wrote about the images on June 26 on his blog Photocritic International, with a guest post by Rob McElroy, entitled “The ‘Magnificent Nine’ Faked by TIME.”

As a professional photographer for the past 34 years, with a wealth of experience developing film, I could not explain why the “ruined” negatives shown in the video looked the way they did.

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‘Retro’ email newsletters are ‘taking off’; Facebook blasted for News Feed study

Here’s our roundup of the top digital and social media stories you should know about (and from Andrew Beaujon, 10 media stories to start your day):

— “Newsletters are clicking because readers have grown tired of the endless stream of information on the Internet,” David Carr of The New York Times writes, “and having something finite and recognizable show up in your inbox can impose order on all that chaos.”

— “With great data comes great responsibility,” Max Nisen explains at Quartz. Facebook is in hot water over a study that “skewed the positive or negative emotional content that appeared in the news feeds of nearly 700,000 users over the course of a week.”

— The Associated Press is embracing software-generated business stories, enabling it to produce 4,400 robo-stories rather than 300 human-written ones, Andrew Beaujon reports at Poynter.… Read more

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Time Inc. launches digital sports network; Yahoo hires editor for breaking news desk

Here’s our roundup of the top digital and social media stories you should know about (and from Andrew Beaujon, 10 media stories to start your day):

— Time Inc.’s new digital sports network, 120 Sports, launches tonight. The network, backed by professional sports leagues (but not the NFL), is geared for mobile and social media users, Emily Steel reports in The New York Times: “240 clips, each two minutes long, across eight hours of daily programming.”

— In the UK, more people now use the Internet for news (41 percent) than newspapers (40 percent). But TV (75 percent) is still the dominant provider of news, according to Ofcom’s annual News Consumption study, reports BBC News.

— Yahoo has hired Lauren Johnston, previously digital editorial director for the Daily News, “as a managing editor to build out a breaking news desk,” Capital New York’s Joe Pompeo writes.… Read more

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Upworthy releases ‘attention minutes’ code; Sports Illustrated to relaunch website

Here’s our roundup of the top digital and social media stories you should know about (and from Andrew Beaujon, 10 media stories to start your day):

Upworthy has released sample code for its “attention minutes” system of measuring engagement. “We actually use attention minutes as a core company goal,” Ed Urgola, Upworthy’s head of marketing, tells Fiona Lowenstein at CJR.

This week, Sports Illustrated becomes the latest Time Inc. magazine to undergo a website refreshing to be more mobile- and video-friendly, Emma Bazilian writes in Adweek. Poynter covered the redesigns of Time and Fortune and Money earlier this year.

Online news and politics videos are watched to the end 43 percent of the time, according to a Coull analysis of 12 million video plays.… Read more

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Photographer Kamaran Najm Ibrahim killed in Iraq

Time

Kamaran Najm Ibrahim, a 27-year-old photographer, was killed near Kirkuk on Thursday, Olivier Laurent reports for Time. Ibrahim was covering fighting between jihadists and security forces.

In 2012, Ibrahim was a co-founder of MetroGraphy, an agency of Iraq-based photographers and photojournalists.

“As an Iraqi photographer based in Kurdistan, I cannot deny that we have [to shoot images of war]. We have to cover breaking news,” Ibrahim explained at a TEDxErbil event in January 2014. “But, as a photographer I know that there are some kinds of other photos that we need to capture, there are some kinds of moments that we need to capture for the history of this country. I wondered where was the beauty?”

In April, Committee to Protect Journalists reported that 164 journalists have been killed in Iraq since 1992.… Read more

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