Articles about "Time Inc."


Former Time Inc. CTO joins magazine startup

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • Frédéric Michel will be a consultant for Sky Italia. He is Telefónica’s Europe director of public affairs and communication. (The Guardian)
  • Bob Mason is now vice president of hosting at NewsCycle Solutions. Previously, he was chief technology officer at Digital First Media. (Poynter)
  • Gregg Doyel is now a sports columnist at The Indianapolis Star. Previously, he was a columnist at CBSSports.com. (The Indianapolis Star)
  • Mike Stamm is now a senior design technologist at The Washington Post. Previously, he led design technology at The Wall Street Journal. Jessie Tseng is an interaction designer at The Washington Post. Previously, she was a user experience designer at Adaptly. (The Washington Post)
  • Sheena Lyonnais will be a freelance writer. Previously, she was managing editor of Yonge Street Media. (Yonge Street Media)
  • Susi Park is general manager of advertising for GQ. Previously, she was assistant general manager of advertising at Wired. (Email)
  • Abe Cytryn is now chief technology officer for Magzter. Previously, he was chief technology officer at Time Inc. (Email)

Job of the day: The Washington Post is looking for a religion writer. Get your résumés in! (The Washington Post)

Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org Read more

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Jill Abramson

Jill Abramson would like a magazine job

mediawiremorningGood morning. We’re almost there. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Area man to appear on television: Chuck Todd will interview President Obama for his first episode of “Meet the Press” on Sunday. (Politico)
  2. HuffPost won’t talk about Jimmy Soni: HuffPost parent AOL was investigating allegations of sexual harrassment by its former managing editor, J.K. Trotter reports. (Gawker) | “Rumors have been swirling inside the company for the past couple of months about Soni’s alleged inappropriate behavior with female Huffington Post fellows.” (Capital)
  3. ONA bends to pressure on its Ferguson panel: “We did not intend to overlook great work at the local level,” Trevor Knoblich writes. “We began today looking for a local person to add to our session.” (ONA) | Earlier: “Why are no local outlets represented in ONA’s Ferguson keynote?” (Poynter) | Related: Kristen Hare is still curating her Twitter list of people reporting from Ferguson.
  4. L.A. Times reporter shared drafts of stories with CIA: Ken Dilanian tells Ken Silverstein he “shouldn’t have” sent stories to CIA spokespeople before he ran them, and he “wouldn’t do it now.” He’s now an AP reporter. AP spokesperson Paul Colford told Silverstein AP is “satisfied that any pre-publication exchanges that Ken had with the CIA before joining AP were in pursuit of accuracy in his reporting on intelligence matters,” and that “we do not coordinate with government agencies on the phrasing of material.” (The Intercept) | Remember quote approval? Jeremy W. Peters reported in 2012 about the practice. (NYT) Many news orgs distanced themselves from it. (Poynter) | Former Washington Post reporter Daniel de Vise got in hot water later that month when Texas Observer revealed he had shared drafts with sources. (Texas Observer) | Then Post Executive Editor Marcus Brauchli clamped down on the practice. (Poynter) | In August of that year, NYT reporter Mark Mazzetti sent an advance copy of a Maureen Dowd column to a CIA spokesperson. (Politico)
  5. Stock of Politico article on Glenn Greenwald drops: An intensely weird Politico Magazine piece that claims “Greenwald Inc. has already peaked,” offering evidence like this: “‘I think there’s a bit of Snowden fatigue out there right now,’ said former NSA director Michael Hayden.” (Politico) | The story “is terrible, in precisely seven ways.” (WP) | “So Glenn Greenwald, having been up—on the strength of Edward Snowden’s decision to trust him with a collection of leaked classified documentation of the NSA’s immense and all but unchecked mass surveillance program—is due to be down. Because the NSA has stopped spying on everyone, hasn’t it?” (Gawker) | Dylan Byers: “I’m of the opinion, and was of the opinion, that [Greenwald] peaked more than a year ago.” (Politico)
  6. Time Inc. chief hints at a plan: CEO Joe Ripp “said he is taking cues from National Geographic’s transformation from a sleepy not-for-profit print publication into a ‘multimedia powerhouse’ in cable television and online.” (Re/code) | Related: At the same conference, Jill Abramson said, “I would like to be working at the highest quality kind of magazine.” (Re/code) | “As she took the stage, seated across from her interviewer, Re/code cofounder Kara Swisher, some in the audience could see she was wearing a piece of statement jewelry: a necklace shaped to spell the word ‘pushy.’” (Capital)
  7. Why Mike came back to Bloomberg: “The goal of increasing the company’s visibility is not about satisfying the former mayor’s ego, Mr. Doctoroff and others say, but rather increasing the demand for terminals,” Jonathan Mahler writes. “The logic is that the more visible Bloomberg becomes, the more likely newsmakers will be to give its reporters news that moves markets.” (NYT) | “Mr. Bloomberg is returning to a more competitive marketplace than the one he left in 2002 and to increasingly strained relations with the financial institutions that make up the company’s core customer base.” (WSJ)
  8. Adieu, Twitpic: “Unfortunately we do not have the resources to fend off a large company like Twitter to maintain our mark which we believe whole heartedly is rightfully ours.” (Twitpic Blog)
  9. Front page of the day, selected by Kristen Hare: The New York Daily News remembers Joan Rivers. (Courtesy Newseum)

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  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin. Robert Lopez will be communications director for California State University, Los Angeles. Previously, he was an investigative reporter for the Los Angeles Times. (LA Observed) | Robin Sproul will be vice president of public affairs for ABC News. Previously, she was Washington bureau chief there. Jonathan Greenberger will be ABC’s Washington bureau chief. He is executive producer of “This Week.” (ABC News) | Rebecca Nelson will be a staff correspondent at the National Journal. Previously, she was an assistant editor at The Washingtonian. (Fishbowl DC) | Dennis Rodkin will run a nursery in California. Previously, he was a reporter at Crain’s Chicago Business. (Crain’s) | Michael Wright will be CEO of DreamWorks Studios. Previously, he was head of programming for TBS, TNT and Turner Classic Movies. (New York Times) | Job of the day: The Associated Press is looking for an administrative correspondent in Austin, Texas. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would like me to send you this roundup each morning? Please email me: abeaujon@poynter.org. Read more

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Timeline: Who’s in and who’s out at Condé Nast

Condé Nast made another high-profile promotion today, appointing Gina Sanders president of Condé Nast Global Development. Hers is the the latest in a series of promotions, hires and departures that has transformed the company’s executive team in recent months. Here’s a quick recap of the shakeup: Read more

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American Freed Syria

American journalist released in Syria; British officials ID man believed to be Foley’s killer

mediawiremorningHappy Monday. Andrew Beaujon is taking a much-deserved vacation. Here are some media stories.

  1. American journalist freed in Syria: On Sunday, UN peacekeepers received Peter Theo Curtis, who was kidnapped in 2012, and turned him over to the U.S. “According to German newspaper die Welt am Sonntag, ‘something was given in return for his release’.” Curtis was “reportedly held by the al-Nusra Front or by splinter groups allied with the al-Qaeda-affiliated group.” (Al Jazeera) | Previously: The U.S. declined to pay ransom for James Foley, who was killed by Islamic State militants last week. (Poynter)
  2. UK intel ID’s person believed to be Foley’s killer: And “sources have said that rampant media speculation about the identity of the killer may be off base.” (NBC News) | Medill professor Ellen Shearer on Foley’s return to the front lines: “Passion prevailed. Jim wasn’t a desk guy.” (Washington Post)
  3. Carr makes peace with Vice: In 2011, when David Carr was “bumping bellies with [Vice CEO Shane] Smith over whose coverage was worthier, I failed to recognize that in a world that is hostile to journalism in all its forms, where dangerous conflicts seem to jump off every other day, you can’t be uppity about where your news comes from.” (New York Times) | Previously: Vice CEO: Woodward and Bernstein used to be punks, too. (Poynter) | Here’s the Carr-Smith showdown from “Page One.” (YouTube)
  4. “The reality is, magazines as a print business will ultimately die,” says Time Inc. CEO Joe Ripp in Gabriel Sherman’s profile of the recently spun-off company. “If we don’t transform this company, someone else will come in and do it.” (New York magazine)
  5. The homepageless Quartz gets a homepage: Visitors to qz.com will now see an “efficient briefing on global business news, called the Brief.” But it’s not “a sea of headlines,” Zach Seward writes in his introduction to the redesigned site. (Quartz) | Previously: The homepage is dead, and the social web has won—even at the New York Times. (Quartz) | Previously: 3 takeaways from the ‘death of the homepage’ and The New York Times innovation report. (Poynter)
  6. Has NYT subscriber growth stalled? Four years ago, a consulting firm estimated for The New York Times that it could reach 800,000 to 900,000 digital-only subscribers. “The problem is, the Times already hit the low end of that projection in June with 831,000 paying online readers,” Edmund Lee reports. (Re/code)
  7. Is it time to ditch native news apps? App use is growing more quickly than mobile Web use, but John McDermott argues news sites can best take advantage of that by having mobile-friendly sites that can be linked to in the apps people are actually using, like Facebook. (Digiday) | Previously: App use dominates mobile browser use, but what does that mean for news content? (Poynter)
  8. ‘We need more of a coffeehouse conversation’: That’s how NBC News president Deborah Turness explains her vision for “Meet the Press” to Bill Carter. Turness tried to make things work with host David Gregory, but “we weren’t able to build a new vision together in the end.” (New York Times) | Previously: Gregory’s replacement is Chuck Todd. (CNN)
  9. Paul Krugman saw Arcade Fire at Barclays Center: “I have to admit that the sound in a big arena is a bit murky — the bass was too loud — so it helped if you already knew and loved all the songs, which I did.” (New York Times)
  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Ed Reams will be news director for WKOW in Madison, Wisconsin. Previously, he was assistant news director at WISN in Milwaukee. (Wheeler Report) | Clayton Clark will be a communication specialist for St. Agnes Hospital. Previously, he was a reporter for KMPH in Fresno. (Fresno Bee) | Bob Kravitz starts today as a columnist and sports reporter at WTHR in Indianapolis. Previously, he was a sports columnist at The Indianapolis Star. (Bob Kravitz) | Job of the day: Poynter’s News University is looking for an interactive learning fellow. Get your résumés in! (Poynter) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org.

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would like this roundup each morning? This week, please email me: skirkland@poynter.org. You can reach your regular roundup guy at: abeaujon@poynter.org


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Another executive leaves Condé Nast

The Wrap | Condé Nast

Condé Nast announced the departure of another member of its executive team Thursday, the third in the last two months.

Lou Cona, chief revenue officer of Condé Nast and president of Condé Nast Media Group, will be leaving the company, according to a press release. No reason was provided for his departure. Read more

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Police Shooting Missouri

Where to buy gas masks for your reporting staff in Ferguson

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Who got arrested in Ferguson last night? Getty Images photographer Scott Olson. (Poynter) | Intercept reporter Ryan Devereaux (The Intercept) | Devereaux “was shot with rubber bullets/beanbags by police last night, spent night in jail. Is due to be released w/o charge soon.” (@the_intercept) | German reporters Ansgar Graw and Frank Hermann. (The Local) | “On Monday, The Washington Post, following the lead of other news organizations, began outfitting its employees with gas masks, purchased at a chain hardware store.” (WP) | Amazon has a pretty good selection of gas masks, some of which are eligible for Prime.
  2. St. Louis Post-Dispatch front page: “Streets Flare Up,” with stunning photo by David Carson (via Newseum) | Carson talked with Kristen Hare last week about covering the unrest in Ferguson. (Poynter) | Hare’s Twitter list of journalists covering Ferguson. (The list keeps changing! Let her know if someone’s missing/no longer there: khare@poynter.org.) | Interesting take: “I believe that publishing unedited images of Ferguson’s demonstrators engaged in possibly criminal behavior — including breaking curfew — is a breach of journalistic ethics.” (Al Jazeera America)
  3. R.I.P. Don Pardo: The NBC announcer and longtime voice of “Saturday Night Live” was 96. (LAT) | When Pardo joined NBC as a radio announcer in 1944, he “also played the role of engineer, getting the radio programs going and cuing up the right bits at the right time. If you could not do those chores, he said, you would not last as a radio announcer.” (NYT)
  4. Some NFL announcers won’t say Redskins’ name: Phil Simms (CBS) and Tony Dungy (NBC) say they won’t use it. “CBS is allowing its announcers to decide on their own whether to call the team the Redskins. So is Fox, which handles the NFC and will televise most of Washington’s games.” (AP) | My list of outlets and journalists who won’t use the term. (Poynter)
  5. Time Inc. rates employees based on how friendly their content is to advertisers: “Writers who may have high assessments for their writing ability, which is their job, were in fact terminated based on the fact the company believed their stories did not ‘produce content that is beneficial to advertiser relationships,’” Guild rep Anthony Napoli tells Hamilton Nolan. (Gawker) | “In a statement, Sports Illustrated said the guild’s interpretation was ‘misleading and takes one category out of context.’” (NYT)
  6. Newsweek builds up Web staff: Its print strategy in place, the magazine is staffing up on digital, Joe Pompeo reports: “The idea is to supplement magazine content, which is only available online to paying subscribers, while building up traffic that can service banner ads and sponsorships.” (Capital)
  7. Medill changes JR program: “The two new choices allow students to choose their own site, which Medill has to approve beforehand, or students can use an existing internship or fellowship to complete their JR requirement, even if it is done over the summer.” (The Daily Northwestern) | Last option is “biggest change,” a tipster tells Jim Romenesko: “Most seniors have completed 2+ internships excluding JR, so we’ve long griped about paying full tuition to add one more internship to our resumes.” (Romenesko) | Taylor Miller Thomas, who did a JR at Poynter, wrote about the strain of journalism internships last year. (Poynter)
  8. Your newsroom needs an audience development person: When Slate hired Katherine Goldstein, “we all had a lot to learn about traffic online, and she taught us about SEO, social,” Editor Julia Turner tells Lucia Moses. “What’s changed is, everyone in house is on board and understands that their primary job is to write great stories, but finding an audience is their job as well.” (Digiday)
  9. How depressing is the U.K. journalism market? “Frankly, moving abroad was the best thing we could have done, given the bloodbath of the UK media market, falling sales and job losses in recent times,” former Birmingham Mail journo Andy Probert tells Nick Hudson. Probert now works in Turkey. (HoldTheFrontPage.co.uk)
  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Ann Keil will be a reporter for WOFL in Orlando. Previously, she was a reporter at WXIN in Indianapolis. Brooks Tomlin will be the station’s weekend, evening and morning meteorologist. Previously, he worked at the Commercial Weather Services of the Australian Bureau of Meteorology in Perth, Australia. (TV Spy) | Elizabeth Saab and Nick Spinetto will be reporters for KTBC in Austin, Texas. Saab was previously a multimedia journalist for Foxnews.com and Spinetto was a reporter at WMUR in Manchester, New Hampshire. (Austin360.com) | Evan White will be a reporter at WFSB. Previously, he was a reporter and fill-in anchor at WHAM in Rochester, New York. (The Laurel) | Anne McNamara is the host of The Now in Denver. Previously, she was an anchor at WAVY in Norfolk, Virginia. (TV Spy) | Job(s) of the day: The Daily Dot is hiring a morning and an evening editor. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org.

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would like me to send you this roundup each morning? Please email me: abeaujon@poynter.org.

Correction: This post originally spelled Phil Simms’ first name with an extra “l.” Read more

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Tennessean-AP

Tennessean will use data, not ‘the journalist’s gut,’ to make decisions

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 (ha ha, OK, you got me, it’s more than 10) media stories.

  1. 21st Century Fox won’t pursue Time Warner: Rupert Murdoch sent a honcho-to-honcho email to Jeffrey L. Bewkes Tuesday afternoon, notifying the Time Warner chief he was withdrawing his previous offer. (NYT) | “Arguably, shareholders had scuttled” the deal already, Brian Stelter writes: “21st Century Fox shares had dropped nearly 10% since the initial bid for Time Warner earlier this summer.” (CNN) | “Long media nerd earnings day. Was going to be fun. But now… [sad trombone]” (@pkafka) | “One large Fox investor said the market is worried about Murdoch’s discipline when it comes to deal-making,” Cristina Alesci reported Tuesday morning. (CNN) | Time Warner revenue was up 3 percent in the second quarter of 2014 over the same period the year before. HBO’s revenue was up 17 percent. (Variety) || Former corporate mate Time Inc. released earnings, too: Revenue was down 1.6 percent. (WWD) | An analyst tells Nicole Levy more layoffs are possible at Time Inc. (Capital)
  2. Tennessean’s “newsroom of the future” will have fewer employees: Everyone will have to reapply for new jobs at the Gannett-owned paper, Executive Editor Stefanie Murray writes. (The Tennessean) | Blake Farmer reports: “Currently, the headcount is at 89. There are 76 positions on the new org chart.” (Nashville Public Radio) | Read: Fewer editors. The reporting staff will grow from 37 to 43, Murray told Poynter in a phone call Tuesday evening. Management positions will fall from 17 to 10. The goal is “self-sufficient reporters producing publication-ready copy,” Murray said. New roles include audience analysts, engagement editors, storytelling coaches and content strategists, and coverage will be determined by listening to readers and gaining a deep understanding of audience analytics: “We’re going to use research as the guide to make decisions and not the journalist’s gut,” she said. The reapplication process should be complete by mid-September, Murray said. || Farmer reported The Tennessean is one of Gannett’s “beta” newsrooms, and indeed, Gannett’s Asheville (North Carolina) Citizen-Times is undergoing a “sweeping reconfiguration” as well. (Citizen-Times)
  3. The NSA stunk up The Intercept’s scoop: The spy agency gave documents to AP reporter Eileen Sullivan after The Intercept asked about them. “After seeing you had the docs, and the fact we had been working with Eileen, we did feel compelled to give her a heads up,” Ryan Grim reports an NSA official told Intercept EIC John Cook in a conference call. “We thought she would publish after you.” (HuffPost) | Sullivan is “no govt shill,” former AP reporter Matt Apuzzo tells Grim in a very interesting discussion. (@mattapuzzo) | The Intercept’s story. | AP’s story.
  4. A look at RT: Mashable interviews current and foreign journalists: Former RT reporter Sara Firth says, “The problem comes if you have information that isn’t in line with what RT is saying. That’s never going to get on air.” RT host Anissa Naouai tells Mashable: “I’m not necessarily sure that after RT I’d want to work for the media.” (Mashable) | Related: David Remnick on Vladimir Putin’s “New Anti-Americanism” (The New Yorker)
  5. Article from Washington Post’s new “Storyline” project takes grisly editor’s note: “Several passages have been removed from this story because the source of those passages, Mickyel Bradford, has admitted to fabricating them,” a note on Jeff Guo‘s story about “The black HIV epidemic” reads. (The Washington Post) | Because of the way the story framed Bradford’s false narrative, “readers might have supposed that Guo was right there, witnessing the interactions between the two men.” (The Washington Post) | Related: “For woman in New York Times hoarding article, a long wait for an editor’s note” (The Washington Post)
  6. BuzzFeed has a new president: Greg Coleman has worked at The Huffington Post and at the advertising agency Criteo. The latter résumé item “is increasingly valuable as publications work to counter the downward march of rates for traditional online advertising,” Ravi Somaiya writes. (NYT)
  7. Dan Snyder’s small media empire: Dave McKenna details the Redskins owner’s never-ending search for friendly coverage. “Lots of the worst things about modern sports marketing—team-produced programming and team-owned news operations—were Snyder innovations.” (Deadspin)
  8. HuffPost moving into Middle East: Plans to “launch an Arabic-language edition aimed at the growing number of young people in the Middle East with mobile devices.” The staff will be based in London. (The Guardian)
  9. Bill Keller says NYT Co. shouldn’t test employees for marijuana use: Current policy “proves that reports of the death of irony are much exaggerated,” he says in a Reddit AMA. (Poynter) | Related: Snoop Dogg asked Times Editorial Page Editor Andy Rosenthal “whats wrong wit a lil wake n bake??” during another AMA Tuesday. (Mediaite) | Rosenthal invited him to visit the Times building, Paul Smalera reports, explaining that “wake and bake” is “a slang term for the act of smoking marijuana upon rising in the morning.” (NYT) | “‘With Juice, Gin’” (@mattfleg)
  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Mirta Ojito will be director of news standards for Telemundo. Formerly, Ojito was an assistant professor at the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. (Telemundo) | Mike Nizza will be executive editor of the as-yet unlaunched Bloomberg Politics website. Formerly, Nizza was digital editor at Esquire. (Fishbowl DC) | Lauren Kern will be executive editor of New York Magazine. Previously, she was deputy editor at The New York Times Magazine. (Capital New York) | Job of the day: The (Tupelo) Northeast Mississippi Daily Journal is looking for a law enforcement reporter. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org.

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would like me to send you this roundup each morning? Please email me: abeaujon@poynter.org. Read more

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Screen Shot 2014-07-21 at 12.06.04 PM

Time.com’s bounce rate down 15 percentage points since adopting continuous scroll

Three major news website redesigns this year look very different but have an important feature in common: articles that seamlessly transition to new content, without requiring readers to click or tap headlines and then wait for new pages to load.

This “continuous scroll” strategy for news sites’ article pages is gaining momentum. It’s been adopted by Time.com, NBCNews.com and LATimes.com, reflecting the fact that direct homepage traffic is waning (see the New York Times innovation report), and traffic from social media (particularly Facebook) just keeps growing.

So as readers increasingly enter sites from “side doors” or article pages, media organizations are trying to figure out how to get them to stick around. Pew recently found that visitors from Facebook are far less engaged than direct visitors. Here’s how sites that relaunched in the first half of 2014 are addressing that problem by making use of the continuous scroll (aka infinite scroll) feature in their article pages:

Time.com

Since its March redesign, Time.com’s bounce rate — the percentage of visitors who leave the site after viewing only one page — has declined by 15 percentage points, according to managing editor Edward Felsenthal. The percentage of desktop visitors going to another piece of content jumped 21 percentage points between February and May.

Felsenthal attributed that to the continuous scroll, which provides a clickless path for readers to reach another story. He said the left rail, which serves as a “traveling homepage” of links to the top stories of the moment, also helped.

The fact that Time.com queues up top stories, not related stories, is crucial to the site’s strategy for serving social visitors, Felsenthal said: “In many ways the major objective of our redesign was to showcase for those users the full Time offering.”

That seems to acknowledge that much of what attracts social media readers to the site initially might not be the content deemed most editorially important. So now, readers going to the site for a story that may not be what you’d expect from Time.com…

… will scroll into Time’s more substantive top stories once they get to the bottom of the article. (For what it’s worth, Felsenthal told Digiday, “We don’t want to do really clickbait-y Facebook posts, because it’s just not what the brand’s about. But we do want to tease.”)

World news typically doesn’t receive as much social engagement as softer content does, but Time’s redesign means more visitors will at least be exposed to hard news. Post-redesign, Felsenthal said, “The mix of our top 10 articles is more reflective of where we want to be.”

NBC News

The redesigned NBC News takes a different approach from Time. Article pages transition into related stories, not top stories. And some stories are compiled into “storylines,” so if you’re interested in “hot cars and kids,” you can read a stack of more than 30 stories.

Mobile page views in June were up 30 percent over the previous 12-month average, according to an NBC News spokesperson. On average, NBC News readers on desktop and mobile are seeing nearly 20 percent more pages per visit than before the site’s February redesign.

Los Angeles Times

The LA Times redesign is less seamless than the other two in terms of transitioning quickly to the next piece of content. There’s a choose-your-own-adventure quality to the layout; non-blog stories transition into a section page instead of another article page based on which section you choose:

latscroll

That gives readers more control over where the site takes them next, but requiring readers to choose what they see next adds some friction that the other sites lack.

A spokesperson for the LA Times said it was too early to share specifics about how the newspaper’s new site is performing. She summed up the goals of the May redesign:

• Eradicating print-centric and antiquated web concepts, such as “the fold,” “the jump,” “endless clicking” and “the dead end” with endless scrolling and multi-directional navigation
• Seamlessly pathing readers from one piece of content to the next, with section fronts and article pages anchored by a row of thumbnails that automatically transport readers to related coverage or other sections

Quartz, Fortune, and Cosmopolitan

The homepage-less Quartz is a clear influence here, particularly for Time. Whatever page you arrive on via social media occupies the top spot in the story stack, with top news — not related stories — below. Editorial news judgment plays a big role in the reader’s experience.

Quartz senior editor Zach Seward said it’s nice to see others emulate one of his site’s signature features: “It must mean we’re onto something.” He also said he doesn’t like the term “infinite scroll”:

The intent is to help users who get to the end of a story but want to keep reading. Some sites have dead ends, others create paralysis of choice. We choose to quietly suggest just one more story, which users can easily scroll into or just ignore. It’s all about that one moment rather some kind of infinite experience.

Seward recently told Digiday’s Ricardo Bilton that Quartz estimates “readers view about 50 percent more stories per visit than they would without the option to scroll.” And, Seward said, “When people choose to read another story on Quartz, about 80 percent do so by scrolling, as opposed to clicking on a headline.”

Time Inc.’s Money and Fortune have also adopted the Quartz-inspired Time.com template for their redesigns. And at the “sexy new Cosmopolitan.com”, a long stack of related stories is presented to readers at the bottom of article pages.

The article page is the new homepage, so what goes on underneath articles seems to be the paramount concern when redesigning a media site in 2014. Some, like Time and Quartz, choose to “quietly suggest” a particular story. Others, like the LA Times and Cosmo, are using the space below stories to offer lots of choices for readers. But all of them have redesigned with an eye toward that second click or page view.


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Time clarifies: Ruined images in D-Day video were photo illustration

After two stories questioning the authenticity of what looked like ruined images in a video for Time, “Robert Capa’s Iconic D-Day Photo of a Soldier in the Surf,” Time has added photo illustration credits, Daniel Kile, vice president of communications for Time Inc., told Poynter in an email.

“TIME’s video and story have been updated to include a photo illustration credit. The film now includes a prominent label on the negatives and on the end credits (see attached for screen grabs). Our story has been updated to include an editor’s note about the change.”

Screen Shot 2014-06-30 at 12.43.51 PM[5][2]

A.D. Coleman wrote about the images on June 26 on his blog Photocritic International, with a guest post by Rob McElroy, entitled “The ‘Magnificent Nine’ Faked by TIME.”

As a professional photographer for the past 34 years, with a wealth of experience developing film, I could not explain why the “ruined” negatives shown in the video looked the way they did. Then, after carefully scrutinizing all the negatives shown in the video, I figured it out.

I had just discovered a journalistic no-no, a breach of trust, a total fraud. TIME had faked nine photographs in their documentary video and never explained to the viewer what they had done.

Coleman wrote about the images again on June 29, calling for an ethics investigation by the National Press Photographers Association.

“I’m glad Time has owned up to the fact that the negatives were indeed fabricated by them,” McElroy told Poynter in a phone interview. “As a former journalist, when I’m misled by something, I’m extremely disappointed.”

Poynter’s Kelly McBride said it sounds like Time did the right thing in adding the photo illustration credits, but they weren’t transparent about them before “and that’s unfortunate. It sounds like they’re trying to make the situation right.”

Even if Time didn’t specify that the images were real, McBride said, if the audience looking at the package might assume they’re real, then transparency is required.

“They’re certainly taking this very seriously, and I appreciate that,” Coleman told Poynter in a phone interview. (He’s also written extensively about Capa and questions about the photographer’s work.)

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‘Retro’ email newsletters are ‘taking off’; Facebook blasted for News Feed study

Here’s our roundup of the top digital and social media stories you should know about (and from Andrew Beaujon, 10 media stories to start your day):

— “Newsletters are clicking because readers have grown tired of the endless stream of information on the Internet,” David Carr of The New York Times writes, “and having something finite and recognizable show up in your inbox can impose order on all that chaos.”

— “With great data comes great responsibility,” Max Nisen explains at Quartz. Facebook is in hot water over a study that “skewed the positive or negative emotional content that appeared in the news feeds of nearly 700,000 users over the course of a week.”

— The Associated Press is embracing software-generated business stories, enabling it to produce 4,400 robo-stories rather than 300 human-written ones, Andrew Beaujon reports at Poynter. But AP Managing Editor Lou Ferrara says the move doesn’t mean job cuts.

— Here’s an idea for how to save Time Inc., from M. Scott Havens, senior vice president of digital: create the next Facebook or LinkedIn. Ben Cardew writes up an interview with Havens at The Guardian.

— Streaming video services are looking to take advantage after rival Aereo lost its case before the Supreme Court last week, Emily Steel writes in The New York Times.


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